FMF Corpsman Question
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  1. #1

    FMF Corpsman Question

    What's up guys, I'm currently in DEP in the Navy as a Corpsman and plan on going FMF, but I have a couple questions about it, as I've read several different things about the life of a Corpsman.

    1. Are Corpsmen on the front lines, kicking in doors, etc. with their platoon? When I was looking into the Navy I was told I'd basically be a Marine shooting people in the face but I'd also be medically trained.

    2. Do corpsmen only carry pistols? Obviously when I was told I'd be doing the same **** as a Marine I assumed I'd be issued an M4 and all that jazz

    3. What's a day in the life like for a Corspman?

    Basically, if I'm not going to be out there, carrying an M4 with the Marines, and doing all the things they do, I'm going to get out of the Navy and enlist in the Marines.

    My recruiters and everyone I talked to ensured me that I'd be carrying an M4 and I'd be out there with them. I have fairly high PT numbers (70 push ups and sit ups, 12 pull ups, 9:30 mile and a half, and a 10:15 500 yd. swim) and was looking at going spec war after a couple tours, so can someone shed some light on Force Recon and MARSOC for me?

    Also, what're my chances of landing an infantry or Force Recon job out of MEPS if I enlisted?

    Thanks guys, I appreciate and answers you can give me.

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  2. #2
    Squad Leader Platinum Member Zulu 36's Avatar
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    FMF Corpsmen have the number one job of medical care for their Marines. Assuming you are assigned to an infantry unit, shooting people is not your job except to protect the wounded. Corpsmen are NOT Marines who just happen to have medical training. You are a Navy Corpsman who happens to have a little combat training.

    Not all FMF corpsmen go to infantry units. Since Navy corpsmen provide medical services to the entire Marine Corps, you could be running sick call in the BAS of a motor transport battalion or an aviation unit. You go where the Navy and the Marine Corps needs you to be.

    Forget Force Recon straight out of Corps School and Field Med school. Ain't happening. Maybe a regular infantry unit.

    As far as weapons, you'll carry what you are assigned and be happy.

    Regarding a day in the life, it depends on where you are assigned.

    Respecting quitting the Navy and joining the Marine Corps, everyone and their brother and sister wants to be infantry. Very hard to get into during these days of cutbacks.

    I'm sure one of our Corpsmen members will be along to fill in the details for you.


  3. #3
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    First off how about Marines and not guys !!! There are Male and Female Marines on this forum.

    Second, watch your cursing on an open forum. You are not hanging on the block here.

    Every question you asked here you should have asked your NAVY recruiter.

    Square away your profile also tough guy !!!


  4. #4
    Well my recruiters led me to believe that I'd be doing what the Marine Corps does, but I'd be medically trained. I've asked them a million questions about it, and every time they just told me what I wanted to hear, so I think its best I come to here for questions about it now. Also, guys is just a general term. I didn't literally mean guys, just people that happen to read the forums.

    I'm no tough guy. Just trying to get answers before I get officially sucked into to something that's not what I wanted


  5. #5
    Thanks for the reply! So basically what you're saying is it could be what I was told, but a bunch of variables have to fall in place first?

    Corpsman is currently at 108% manning, and I managed to get that job, but I'm not sure if I should test my luck again. Are my chances higher if I do well on the ASVAB? Or is it all down to luck?


  6. #6
    I'm guessing none of your recruiters were Corpsman since most of what you referenced from "other people" is pure fiction.Post #2 has the basic information,but there are no guarantees.Even if you are at the top of your "A" class you can be assigned wherever the Navy needs you.


  7. #7
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    OK, here you go.


    Fleet Marine Force (FMF) is an earned qualification. Only those sailors who are attached to forward-deployable Marine units are eligible to earn the FMF pin. The rigorous process takes months and consists of study, written testing and oral boards.


    Corpsmen who are attached to ships rather than to forward-deployed Marine units may earn Enlisted Surface Warfare Specialist and Enlisted Aviation Warfare Specialist quals. Both require the same program of study, testing, and oral boards. You'll hear the final oral board called the 'murder board,' by the way....


    The Fleet Marine Force pin is more than just a piece of metal worn on a sailor’s uniform. It represents a rite of passage endured and a sacrifice made by the individual wearing it, and it signifies that the individual is an “FMF sailor.”

    It represents the devotion a sailor has to the Marine Corps and to learning every aspect of his or her job. To earn the pin, a sailor is required to learn Marine Corps history, how a Marine unit operates and what it takes to be a Marine mentally and physically.

    The pin shows the level of dedication a sailor has to the Navy and Marine Corps. Upon completion of the 13 - 16 month process, a ceremony is conducted giving the sailor the right to wear the pin.

    Not all sailors can earn the pin. Only sailors attached to forward-deployable Marine units are eligible to earn the FMF pin.

    Sailors must belong to an operational combat element of a Marine Expeditionary Force to start earning their pins. From the first day of arrival to their Marine Corps units, sailors can begin completing the requirements of earning the pin.

    “It is a privilege to have earned the right to be considered part of the Corps. Marines don’t hand out the eagle, globe and anchor to just anyone. You really have to earn it.”

    There are more than 30 warfare designator pins, but when sailors see other sailors wearing the FMF pin, a higher respect is given to those sailors, knowing that they have proven they can keep up with the Marines.

    Sailors are issued a book by their command that has all the knowledge required for their platform.

    Once the sailor has the Personal Qualification Standards book, he or she must present him or herself to a Marine non-commissioned officer or higher, who is familiar with FMF qualifications, and have him or her teach a section of Corps knowledge. Once the instructing Marine feels the sailor has sufficiently learned the topic, he or she administers a practical application and verbal test to ensure knowledge was retained and a signature of approval is given.

    After the eight- to 11-month process, a written test is administered. A board is then convened of senior enlisted Marines and sailors.

    The board consists of two separate sections. First, Marine Corps knowledge questions are administered, and if the individual qualifies, the board will decide if the sailor is ready to move onto the next section. The second section consists of detailed knowledge about the platform they’re assigned to. For example, the wing platform is Air Combat Element and consists of any detail about Marine Corps Aviation, from the name of an aircraft to the breakdown of each MAW squadron.

    In order to earn and keep the FMF pin, sailors must perform and be held accountable to complete all standard Marine Corps training, such as qualifying on the rifle range and completing a Marine Corps physical fitness test and combat fitness test every year.

    When Marines see the FMF pin, they know the sailor has sacrificed a lot of time and effort towards earning it.


  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by DanM View Post
    I'm guessing none of your recruiters were Corpsman since most of what you referenced from "other people" is pure fiction.Post #2 has the basic information,but there are no guarantees.Even if you are at the top of your "A" class you can be assigned wherever the Navy needs you.
    That is correct, none of them were Corpsman. I actually just talked to the director of physical fitness for the NSW recruits in my recruiting district, and he told me that he has the phone number of the guy who does screening for SARC, and that I can call him up right out of A school and get him to come by. Do you know if that would actually happen?


  9. #9
    Corpsmen are a Marine's best friend.


  10. #10
    You sound like you don't give a sh*t about being a Corpsman and doing the things that Corpsmen do. This is indicative from your mentioning of "carrying M4's, kicking in doors and shooting people in the face" several times in your original post. I wouldn't want you as my Corpsman. If you want to be Rambo so bad, enlist in the Marines and go infantry. Your recruiter "assured you" that you'd be issued an M4 though...that's your concern LMAO. You sound like you're choosing the Navy because you want to avoid the hardship of Marine bootcamp and SOI while still getting to wear our cammies and possibly "carry an M4." And this isn't a knock against Corpsmen, they're a Marines best friend BECAUSE they're there when you get hit and need medical attention....you don't seem to care much about that. You want to be Billy Badass. Go to a Marine recruiter and choose infantry then. No balls.


  11. #11
    LCPL1341, I couldn't have said it better. I too wouldn't have wanted him to be my teams Corpsman with the attitude he has


  12. #12
    Administrator Platinum Member madsox's Avatar
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    And one more wannabe either 1: is done (mic drop) or 2: will show he doesn't know when to just shuddup.

    Thanks, LCpl1341 and Doc Dan!


  13. #13
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    I posted everything he asked for and you would think a simple thank you was in order......

    You can tell by my post #3 that I thought he was a Jackwagon then now after these post I'm leaning more towards Troll.

    The tone/attitude of the OP's Rambo posts better change or this thread goes away and so does the OP !!!


  14. #14
    Sounds like a Marine wannabe to me. If you want to do Marine things (and not Navy corpsman things), then just join the Marine Corps! Simple.


  15. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by LCPL1341 View Post
    You sound like you don't give a sh*t about being a Corpsman and doing the things that Corpsmen do. This is indicative from your mentioning of "carrying M4's, kicking in doors and shooting people in the face" several times in your original post. I wouldn't want you as my Corpsman. If you want to be Rambo so bad, enlist in the Marines and go infantry. Your recruiter "assured you" that you'd be issued an M4 though...that's your concern LMAO. You sound like you're choosing the Navy because you want to avoid the hardship of Marine bootcamp and SOI while still getting to wear our cammies and possibly "carry an M4." And this isn't a knock against Corpsmen, they're a Marines best friend BECAUSE they're there when you get hit and need medical attention....you don't seem to care much about that. You want to be Billy Badass. Go to a Marine recruiter and choose infantry then. No balls.
    I do give a **** about being a corpsman. I actually turned down an EOD contract that I'd worked for for 2 months. I turned it down because I wanted to directly effect peoples' lives while still being the billy badass that I could've been while being an EOD Technician. I hope you see where I'm coming from on this one. I guess I should've wrote the post under a clearer head, considering I was a little rattled after finding out I had been misled about the job decision. I'm still going to go through with my Corpsman contract and attempt to get into the SARC program. I meant no offense. Thank you for your time.


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