How many Nam Vets die per day is what???
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  1. #1
    Squad Leader Free Member Wyoming's Avatar
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    How many Nam Vets die per day is what???

    Interesting Vietnam & other military statistical information

    In case you haven't been paying attention these past few decades after you returned from Vietnam , the clock has been ticking.

    The following are some statistics that are at once depressing yet in a larger sense should give you a huge sense of pride.

    "Of the 2,709,918 Americans who served in Vietnam , Less than 850,000 are estimated to be alive today, with the youngest American Vietnam veteran's age approximated to be 54 years old." How does it feel to be among the last third of all the Vietnam Veterans who served in Vietnam to be alive?

    I don't know about you guys, but it kind of gives me the chills.

    Considering the kind of information available about the death rate of WWII and Korean War Veterans, publicized information indicates that in the last 14 years Vietnam veterans are dying at the rate of 390 deaths each day.

    At this rate there will be only a few of us alive in 2015.

    These statistics were taken from a variety of sources to include: The VFW Magazine, the Public Information Office, and the HQ CP Forward
    Observer.

    Illegitimi Non Carborundum!!





  2. #2
    What the hell we cant live forever......


  3. #3
    Well hell,I'm not going to roll over and die tonight....So I'll stand up and go get a beer.......
    I raise my glass to Viet Vets....
    SEMPER FI MY BROTHERS......
    Ed........


  4. #4
    Come on you sons of *****es, do you want to live forever Dan Daly Belleau Wood June 1918


  5. #5

    Great Lakes National Cemetary

    Visited my Dad's (WW2 vet) gravesite there Memorial Day 2009; it is astounding how many Vietnam veterans are buried there now. A lot of them with birth years from 1946 to 1952.

    I had an NBC course instructor that said we could never be sure that beyond combat deaths, how many of us that would serve in country would die before our contemporaries that never served in country. Talk about a prophecy that is coming true. His contention was that whatever chemicals and unknown diseases would do it to us.


  6. #6
    You know Big Al I just posted a memorial for my Seabee friend Mac who just died from Pancreatic cancer. He and I were in nam 67-69 I have been so sad and reflective since Saturday when zI got the news about his death.

    We are on the downhill side of the mountain and I dread going through the continued loss of friends and Brothers again! Lost another one a couple of months back.

    This getting old stuff just brings back the old PTSD stuff again.


  7. #7

    How many nam vets....

    Well I guarantee you I won't die by the va time table. After 4 miss-diagnosis I finally wised up and started going to a civilian Dr. My family most all die of old age in their late 80's and 90's, except for the ones that have a certain gene. I do not have it. I do not go to the va, and will not depend on the medical treatment they give out. I will go to optical, audiology, and dental, as they certainly can not deny me that. That is as far as they will go with me. After bout 40 years I finally wised up. In a few years when you are about to croke, remember what I have told you. It will be to late then. Semper Fi, and Ready-App.


  8. #8
    Marine Free Member Riven37's Avatar
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    !

    The question is this...Who will be the last Vietnam Vet left alive when the rest of us are dead, and how old will he be. Most likely he will be a Marine.





  9. #9
    God Bless You Vietnam Veterans!

    Semper-Fi!




    From the Vietnam Veterans Association:




    In case you Vietnam Veterans haven't been paying attention these past few decades after you returned from Vietnam, the clock has been ticking.



    The following are some statistics that are at once depressing yet, in a larger sense, should give some a sense of pride.

    "Of the 2,709,918 Americans who served in Vietnam; less than 850,000 are
    estimated to be alive today, with the youngest American Vietnam veteran's
    age approximated to be 54 years old."

    So, if you're alive and reading this, how does it feel to be among the
    last 1/3rd of all the U.S. Vets who served in Vietnam? Don't know about
    you, but feels a little strange considering this is the kind of information we are used to reading about WWII and Korean War vets.

    So the last 14 years we have been dying at a faster rate then most. Too fast, only a few will survive by 2015...if any.

    Every day, 390 Veitnam Veterans die. So in 2190 days from today you will be lucky to be alive.

    These statistics were taken from a variety of sources to include: The VFW
    Magazine, the Public Information Office, and the HQ CP Forward Observer -
    1st Recon, April 12, 1997.

    STATISTICS FOR IN-COUNTRY VIETNAM VETERANS:

    A total of 9,087,000 military personnel served on active duty during the Vietnam Era (August 5, 1964 - May 7, 1975).

    A total of 8,744,000 GIs were on active duty during the war (Aug 5, 1964-March 28,1973).

    A total of 2,709,918 Americans served in Vietnam, this number represents 9.7% of their generation.

    A total of 3,403,100 (Including 514,330 offshore) personnel served in the broader Southeast Asia Theater (Vietnam, Laos, Cambodia, flight crews based in Thailand, and sailors in adjacent South China Sea waters).

    A total of 2,594,000 personnel served within the borders of South Vietnam (Jan. 1,1965 - March 28, 1973). Another 50,000 men served in Vietnam between 1960 and 1964.

    Of the 2.6 million, between 1M and 1.6 M (40-60%) either fought in
    combat, or provided close support or were at least fairly regularly exposed
    to enemy attack.

    7,484 women (6,250 or 83.5% were nurses) served in Vietnam.

    Peak troop strength in Vietnam: 543,482 (April 30, 1968).

    CASUALTIES:
    The first man to die in Vietnam was James Davis, in 1958. He was with the
    509th Radio Research Station. Davis Station in Saigon was named for him.

    Hostile deaths: 47,378
    Non-hostile deaths: 10,800

    Total: 58,202 (Includes men formerly classified as MIA and Mayaguez
    casualties). Men who have subsequntly died of wounds account for the
    changing total.

    8 nurses died -- 1 was KIA..

    61% of the men killed were 21 or younger..11,465 of those killed were younger than 20 years old.

    Of those 47,378 hostile deaths in Vietnam:

    29,869 were single

    17,509 were married.
    Average age: 23.1 years
    Enlisted Personnel: 30,274.
    Officers: 6,598 28.43
    Warrant Officers: ,2,724
    E1(Private): 12,520.34
    11B (Infantry, Rifleman) MOS: 18,465

    Five men killed in Vietnam were only 16 years old.

    The oldest man killed was 62 years old.

    Highest State death rate: West Virginia - 84.1% (national average 58.9%
    for every 100,000 males in 1970).

    Wounded: 303,704

    153,329 hospitalized

    150,375 injured requiring no hospital care.

    Severely disabled: 75,000,

    23,204: 100% disabled;

    5,283 lost or severely impared limbs;

    1,081 sustained multiple amputations.

    Amputation or crippling wounds to the lower extremities were 300% higher
    than in WWII and 70% higher than Korea. (Expanded use of land mines)

    Multiple amputations occurred at the rate of 18.4% compared to 5.7% in
    WWII.

    AT THE END OF THE WAR

    58,338 - Missing in Action

    POWs: 766 (114 died in captivity)


    As of January 15, 2004, there are 1,875 Americans still unaccounted for
    from the Vietnam War.

    DRAFTEES VS.. VOLUNTEERS:
    25% (648,500) of total force in country were draftees.

    66% of U.S. armed forces members were drafted during WWII
    Draftees accounted for 30% (17,725) of combat deaths in Vietnam.
    Reservists: 5,977
    National Guard: 6,140 served: 101 died.

    Total draftees (1965 - 1973): 1,728,344.
    Army Draft: 1,685,711

    Marine Corps Draft: 42,633
    Last man drafted: June 30, 1973.

    RACE AND ETHNIC BACKGROUND:

    88.4% of the men who actually served in Vietnam were Caucasian

    10.6% (275,000) were black

    1% belonged to other races.



    Killed in Action

    86% Caucations

    12% (7,241) were black;

    2% Hispanic
    1% belonged to other races.

    70% of enlisted men killed were of North-west European descent.
    14.6% (1,530) of non-combat death were among blacks.
    34% of blacks who enlisted, volunteered for the combat arms.

    Overall blacks suffered 12% of the deaths in Vietnam at a time when the
    percentage of blacks of military age was 13.5% of the total population..

    Religion of Dead: Protastant -- 64.4%; Catholic -- 28.9%; other/none --



    SOCIO-ECONOMIC STATUS:

    Vietnam veterans have a lower unemployment rate than the same non-vet age groups.

    Vietnam veterans' personal income exceeds that of our non-veteran age
    group by more than 18 percent.

    76% of the men sent to Vietnam were from the working class
    75% had family incomes above the poverty level

    50% were from middle income backgrounds.

    Some 23% of Vietnam vets had fathers with professional, managerial or
    technical occupations.



    EDUCATION
    79% of the men who served HAD a High School education or higher.

    63% of Korean War vets

    45% of WWII vets had completed High School

    DEATH BY REGION

    South -- 31%

    West --29.9%
    Midwest -- 28..4%

    Northeast -- 23.5%.

    DRUG USAGE & CRIME:
    There is no difference in drug usage between Vietnam Veterans and
    non-Vietnam Veterans of the same age group. (Source: Veterans
    Administration Study, 1995/National Association of Chiefs of Police)

    Vietnam Veterans are far less likely to be in prison - only one-half of one
    percent of Vietnam Veterans have been jailed for crimes.

    85% of Vietnam Veterans made successful transitions to civilian life.
    82% of veterans who saw heavy combat strongly believe the war was lost
    because of lack of political will.
    75% of the public agrees it was a failure of political will, not of arms.

    HONORABLE SERVICE:
    97% of Vietnam-era veterans were honorably discharged.
    91% of actual Vietnam War veterans

    90% of those who saw combat say they were proud serve their country.
    74% say they would serve again, even knowing the outcome.
    87% of the public now holds Vietnam veterans in high esteem..

    INTERESTING CENSUS STATISTICS



    THOSE TO CLAIM TO HAVE "Been There": (Census Figures)
    1,703,823 of those who served in Vietnam were still alive as of August,1995
    9,492,958 Falsely claim to to have served Vietnam (Census Stats., 2000)

    1995 Federal Census
    Vietnam Veteran population estimate is: 1,002,511. This is hard to
    believe, losing nearly 711,000 between '95 and '00.



    Vietnam Veterans are dying at a rate of 390 per day.



    During the most recent Federal Census (yr. 2000), the number of Americans falsely claiming to have served in-country is: 13,853,227. (This means that FOUR OUT OF FIVE WHO CLAIM TO BE Vietnan vets are not.)

    The Department of Defense Vietnam War Service Index officially provided by The War Library originally reported that 2,709,918 U.S. military personnel as having served in-country (Corrections and confirmations to this erred index resulted in the addition of 358 U.S. military personnel confirmed to have served in Vietnam but not originally listed by the Department of Defense. All names are currently on file and accessible day and night.)

    Isolated atrocities committed by American Soldiers produced torrents of
    outrage from anti-war critics and the news media while Communist
    atrocities were so common that they received hardly any media mention at all. The United States sought to minimize and prevent attacks on civilians while North Vietnam made attacks on civilians a centerpiece of its strategy.

    Americans who deliberately killed civilians received prison sentences
    while Communists who did so received commendations.

    From 1957 to 1973, the National Liberation Front assassinated 36,725
    Vietnamese and abducted another 58,499. The death squads focused on
    leaders at the villige level and on anyone who improved the lives of the peasants such as medical personnel, social workers, and school teachers.
    ( Nixon Presidential Papers)





  10. #10
    That is what I call haveing the numbers down.
    John J


  11. #11
    Marine Friend Free Member
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    Greetings Marines,

    ECFree has the right idea. Go out and hoist a few. Celebrate life for as long as you can. Everyone our age knows death is closer than when we were 20 (unless they were in combat in Vietnam). I prefer to view the stats article about How Many Die as a wake up call to make the most of what time remains. Not something else to make Vietnam Vets sad. Phantom's response very interesting (and detailed like his PTSD article which was very helpful to a friend who needed to read it). I wish the media would give the public some of this info. Sadly even now the uninformed public has difficulty accepting the positive statistics about the successes of the Vietnam Vets. The legacy of the 60's-70's continues. The media still insists on presenting only the negative side (drug addicts, homeless, vets never got it together after the war). Sometimes I think it is a not so subtle way to say it's ok what we didn't do for the returning vets. The public and the media that gave them misinformation can't afford to see how they abandoned these heroes or how great their sacifices for love of their country were. They tried to take their honor and pride by ignoring them when they should have thanked them. Couldn't man up.

    We can still thank these vets and I'm seeing some of that. Maybe the soldiers in our present war will fare better. I'm not a vet only a civilian, but I remember when the Vietnam War was over. Thank you Marines for all your sacrifices and courage to preserve freedom here and in other countries.

    Semper Fi!

    Carolyn

    Freedom is not free, but the Marine Corps will pay most of your share. -Ned Dolan




  12. #12
    Marine Free Member FistFu68's Avatar
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    Angry Only thing that Scares Me 'bout dying ain't gonna be able too Fuc anymore

    Every day since I left that fucing Hell Hole has been a given I was told once that I'd never see 19!!! Any of You Horny Widows out there own any Real Estate?If so Hit this Handsome Bastard up


  13. #13
    Marine Free Member sparkie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by patriotgrl View Post
    Greetings Marines,

    ECFree has the right idea. Go out and hoist a few. Celebrate life for as long as you can. Everyone our age knows death is closer than when we were 20 (unless they were in combat in Vietnam). I prefer to view the stats article about How Many Die as a wake up call to make the most of what time remains. Not something else to make Vietnam Vets sad. Phantom's response very interesting (and detailed like his PTSD article which was very helpful to a friend who needed to read it). I wish the media would give the public some of this info. Sadly even now the uninformed public has difficulty accepting the positive statistics about the successes of the Vietnam Vets. The legacy of the 60's-70's continues. The media still insists on presenting only the negative side (drug addicts, homeless, vets never got it together after the war). Sometimes I think it is a not so subtle way to say it's ok what we didn't do for the returning vets. The public and the media that gave them misinformation can't afford to see how they abandoned these heroes or how great their sacifices for love of their country were. They tried to take their honor and pride by ignoring them when they should have thanked them. Couldn't man up.

    We can still thank these vets and I'm seeing some of that. Maybe the soldiers in our present war will fare better. I'm not a vet only a civilian, but I remember when the Vietnam War was over. Thank you Marines for all your sacrifices and courage to preserve freedom here and in other countries.

    Semper Fi!

    Carolyn

    Freedom is not free, but the Marine Corps will pay most of your share. -Ned Dolan
    AND YOU ARE????


  14. #14
    Marine Free Member HST's Avatar
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    We should have a last mans club like the WWI guy do. Only for us Nam guys it will be a bottle of Nam 5 dollar MPC a fifth rott gut and a big fat joint


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