Radio Operator MOS/Communications - Page 3
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  1. #31
    Marine Free Member d3vi1d06 4 life's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by commdog7 View Post
    Two and a half years? You've barely been in for two years... unless you got dropped a few times in boot camp.

    I doubt you have set up all the HF, VHF, and UHF radios we use as well as all the accessories for the vehicle mounts and the ground radios. I doubt you even know how to load crypto. Radio operators is a changing field, there are always new and different versions of radios coming out that we need to know. Next time comm goes down, I'll make sure to call you, I'd like to see you identify and fix the problem when time is a factor and Marine's lives are at stake.

    But if you really want our mos, you can have it. Hope you enjoy digging trenches for the comm wire and inventoring massive amounts of gear every week- on top of whatever it is you do in your mos. Oh, and you can follow the grunts into combat while humping 30-50 lbs of radio gear in addition to your combat load. My advice: stay in your air conditioned work site and play on your computers. It is good that you want to cross-train, but know what your talking about before you go embarrass yourself.

    Here's a question for you, since you know our mos so well.... how do you modify an OE (you know what that is right?) for HF and UHF capabilities? You said you learned our mos in a week, so you should know this.



    time in service is calculated by the date you step on the yellow footprints. that date for me was 01Aug2007. so i was exaggerating a little when i said 2 1/2 years. its more like 2 1/4 years. not less than 2 years. math for marines mci?

    you are looking past my point and getting all defensive. these new radios that are replacing the prc-117's prc-etc's..... are all programmable by, gasp, pause for effect, computers!!!!!! oh no!!! looks like 21's need to get up to speed on the geek side of the 06 field. as far as the crypto? its easy theres a device that you plug into the radio, you press 2 buttons and voila!!! mind you, this is the new tech. the way of the future.

    OE? yeah i dont know what that is. im a computer guy. i know that when your outlook is not working and you need it fixed cause you cant send an email, you come see me. as far as HF (high freq) UHF (ultra high freq) programming is classified, so im not answering that one.


  2. #32
    Quote Originally Posted by d3vi1d06 4 life View Post
    its almost two and a half years in. and surprise!!!! i do the radio guys job!!!!!! another surprise. IM IN IRAQ NOW!!!! its not that difficult. the only thing i cant do is repair the radios. thats a whole other field. and a year long school but as far as operating the radio. easy day. i learned your whole mos in one week. easy day.

    ooorah!!!
    That is interesting that you say you learned the entire MOS of field radio operator in one week. Perhaps you should tell the CMC that the school length of two months is not necessary because you learned it in one week.

    And explain to us what you do when you do the radio guys job? Turing on a radio and talking over the net does not make you a radio operator. Having radio watch does not make you a radio operator either.

    And is there some good reason you had to mention you WERE IN IRAQ NOW?


  3. #33
    Quote Originally Posted by d3vi1d06 4 life View Post
    time in service is calculated by the date you step on the yellow footprints. that date for me was 01Aug2007. so i was exaggerating a little when i said 2 1/2 years. its more like 2 1/4 years. not less than 2 years. math for marines mci?

    you are looking past my point and getting all defensive. these new radios that are replacing the prc-117's prc-etc's..... are all programmable by, gasp, pause for effect, computers!!!!!! oh no!!! looks like 21's need to get up to speed on the geek side of the 06 field. as far as the crypto? its easy theres a device that you plug into the radio, you press 2 buttons and voila!!! mind you, this is the new tech. the way of the future.

    OE? yeah i dont know what that is. im a computer guy. i know that when your outlook is not working and you need it fixed cause you cant send an email, you come see me. as far as HF (high freq) UHF (ultra high freq) programming is classified, so im not answering that one.
    You're a douche-bag POG disrespecting an NCO. Go fvck yourself. POG-ass nerd bit**


  4. #34
    I didn't mean to de-track the original post, I just felt I had to inform this arrogant bastard of his foolishness.


  5. #35
    Quote Originally Posted by d3vi1d06 4 life View Post
    time in service is calculated by the date you step on the yellow footprints. that date for me was 01Aug2007. so i was exaggerating a little when i said 2 1/2 years. its more like 2 1/4 years. not less than 2 years. math for marines mci?

    you are looking past my point and getting all defensive. these new radios that are replacing the prc-117's prc-etc's..... are all programmable by, gasp, pause for effect, computers!!!!!! oh no!!! looks like 21's need to get up to speed on the geek side of the 06 field. as far as the crypto? its easy theres a device that you plug into the radio, you press 2 buttons and voila!!! mind you, this is the new tech. the way of the future.

    OE? yeah i dont know what that is. im a computer guy. i know that when your outlook is not working and you need it fixed cause you cant send an email, you come see me. as far as HF (high freq) UHF (ultra high freq) programming is classified, so im not answering that one.
    Based on your statements, you are saying that you can replace me; that you know everything about radios as I do based on a one week learning experience. I say you are full of sh!t. You can't do half the stuff I can with radios. You don't know what an OE is? Wow, every radio operator knows what that is, we set them up all the time. You learn how to talk on one radio and you think you know the whole mos... you crack me up.

    When I was in Iraq, I was teaching 5939's how to do their job, and their school is about 9 months long. Does that mean I know more than a 5939? No. There are plenty of 5939's that know more than I do about their radio equipment. Like I said, good on you for taking your time to learn some things about another mos, but don't think for one second that you know more than most radio operators. Radios continue to play a major role in today's military, they are no where near being replaced by computers. Grunts take radio operators into battle, not computer geeks- that won't change any time soon.

    I was in Iraq in '06, times have changed. How you enjoying Camp Cupcake?


  6. #36
    Quote Originally Posted by USCFIGHTONUSC View Post
    This post is for those who are looking at the MOS of 0621, Field Radio Operator. Many times I get asked what this MOS does out in the FMF. And many times people enlist into this MOS without knowing where you can end up. I will try to clear up some things about this MOS.

    A male radio operator can land you in any one of the following types of units/battalions.
    -Engineer
    -Artillery
    -Infantry
    -Tanks
    -AAV
    -Headquarters
    -Communications

    This means you will be a radio operator in these unit types. You will not be an infantryman or a tanker as an example, if assigned to those units. And in the larger communication units you will be with only fellow communicators.

    Many times people do not want to be in an infantry unit, so they pick this MOS without knowing you very well can end up there. Now you know. You have absolutely no say in what unit type you get placed into.

    As an example my brother and I were both radiomen but in different unit types. He was in an engineer battalion and I was in an infantry battalion. Our experiences were totally different. This is the danger in asking a radioman what his adventures were like because this does not mean you will do likewise.

    Obviously in an infantry battalion there is more opportunity to experience alot more of the USMC, but this is not for everyone. Certain radiomen will get assigned to go out with the battalion's companies and you will be responsible for the communications in that company. And you will very often do as they do, but with a radio on your back.

    The same info above applies to the MOS of Field Wireman. And there are several other MOS's that also are found in these units. I am not positive on which ones but they are techs who fix the radios and other gear.

    So when choosing the radio operator or wireman MOS's, make sure you are aware that you can end up in a variety of unit types.
    hey wait a second,I was a radio operator and we were 2531's.When did the designation change? was with arty and later in the wing.but that was in the late 80s.


  7. #37
    Quote Originally Posted by RYDERKUR View Post
    You're a douche-bag POG disrespecting an NCO. Go fvck yourself. POG-ass nerd bit**
    Guys,the enemy is out there remember? unless you guys are practicing stand-up on SNL. Semper Fi


  8. #38
    Quote Originally Posted by GuitarNineteen View Post
    hey wait a second,I was a radio operator and we were 2531's.When did the designation change? was with arty and later in the wing.but that was in the late 80s.
    Not sure how many years ago they changed it, but it is now 0621.


  9. #39
    The change from 2500 to 0600 MOS designator came in the 2000 to 2001 timeframe.


  10. #40

    Vollenteers

    I have a question. Aren't radiomen all volunteers? In Korea, H+S Companys Gunny came through the Battalion, looking for people, to become radiomen. At the time, I was an Ammo carrier, on a Light Johnson. I figured carrying a radio couldn't be any worse than humping those damned ammo cans, so I told my squad leader, that I wanted to take a shot at it. He told me to go ahead, but he also told me I would be safer where I was. He then explained to me, the reason they wanted volunteers, was because the linhe companies used up a lot of them. He told me about a thing called an 'Actuarial Chart'. That chart, lists all of the jobs, in an infantry division, and the life expectancy, on average, of each job, in a combat situation. That chart was invented by an insurance Co, and those dudes know about the Odds. I'll try to get this right for you. Rifleman-10min.,BARman-5min., Machinegunner, I think, was 6min. Company Officers-3min., Company Commander-1min., radioman-5sec. That was why we were all volunteers. Don't ever be afraid to say , your a radioman That's another title, you have to earn. S/F! Ken


  11. #41
    hells bells!!!!!! I was an 0351 and carried a radio,so whats the beef?


  12. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by kenrobg30 View Post
    I have a question. Aren't radiomen all volunteers? In Korea, H+S Companys Gunny came through the Battalion, looking for people, to become radiomen. At the time, I was an Ammo carrier, on a Light Johnson. I figured carrying a radio couldn't be any worse than humping those damned ammo cans, so I told my squad leader, that I wanted to take a shot at it. He told me to go ahead, but he also told me I would be safer where I was. He then explained to me, the reason they wanted volunteers, was because the linhe companies used up a lot of them. He told me about a thing called an 'Actuarial Chart'. That chart, lists all of the jobs, in an infantry division, and the life expectancy, on average, of each job, in a combat situation. That chart was invented by an insurance Co, and those dudes know about the Odds. I'll try to get this right for you. Rifleman-10min.,BARman-5min., Machinegunner, I think, was 6min. Company Officers-3min., Company Commander-1min., radioman-5sec. That was why we were all volunteers. Don't ever be afraid to say , your a radioman That's another title, you have to earn. S/F! Ken

    You Got That Right Ken !!!

    TSSC Crypto 2631 / 2531

    Semper Fi,
    Rocky


  13. #43

    Oh goody!

    Quote Originally Posted by d3vi1d06 4 life View Post
    radio operators are at the bottom part of the 06 field.

    im a 0651 tactical data operator, or information systems coordinator. at the top of the 06 field (the data dinks).

    in my experience, we dont need radio operators. back in april, i took a week long class on all the new radio gear. in this class were all the radio operators, and the computer guys like me. we were learning about the new radios and testing them out. the computer guys were picking up the knowledge and running with it. while the radio guys were dumbfounded. i personally had a radio up in running and talking to the instructor within 5 minutes. mind you it takes alot of programming to get these new radios up and running. meanwhile the radio guys were completely lost, and this was their job.

    my point: the age of the radio being operated by low asvab service members is over. its the age of the high asvab computer guys being the radio operators. because seriously, from what i saw, 0621's cant handle operating these new radios.

    mos 0621 (glorified grunt) is in the dawn of being phased out. the 0651's and 0656's are gonna be learning all of the mos's in the 06 field. the age of the geeks has arrived!!!! long live the geeks!!!!!

    ooorah!!!
    Nothing like a little arrogance to start the day. Wow1 these guys must be GOOD! Sempre Fidelis! Ken


  14. #44

    aadd on

    Quote Originally Posted by kenrobg30 View Post
    I have a question. Aren't radiomen all volunteers? In Korea, H+S Companys Gunny came through the Battalion, looking for people, to become radiomen. At the time, I was an Ammo carrier, on a Light Johnson. I figured carrying a radio couldn't be any worse than humping those damned ammo cans, so I told my squad leader, that I wanted to take a shot at it. He told me to go ahead, but he also told me I would be safer where I was. He then explained to me, the reason they wanted volunteers, was because the linhe companies used up a lot of them. He told me about a thing called an 'Actuarial Chart'. That chart, lists all of the jobs, in an infantry division, and the life expectancy, on average, of each job, in a combat situation. That chart was invented by an insurance Co, and those dudes know about the Odds. I'll try to get this right for you. Rifleman-10min.,BARman-5min., Machinegunner, I think, was 6min. Company Officers-3min., Company Commander-1min., radioman-5sec. That was why we were all volunteers. Don't ever be afraid to say , your a radioman That's another title, you have to earn. S/F! Ken
    There was one job that I forgot to mention. The FMF Corpsman-also, 5sec. Sorry Docs, slow memory when I get upset. S/F! Ken


  15. #45
    Sorry to tell you d3vi1d06, but there will always be a need for radio operators. Even if you think you learn the job as an 0651, you don't learn nearly enough. Even as a 2651 (Special Intel Communicator) we learn all the different communication systems, but there's no way we could phase out an MOS dedicated to one. We're just the "Jack of All Trades, Master of None". If we actually received training for radios and it's considered part of our MOS, and still think the 0621s are needed, then you as an 0651 should probably be thinking the same thing.

    All that aside, I hate radios. Haha. I signed on mainly for the data side, but I have played with radios a bit. (117s, 119s, and 150s). Have used an OE but I couldn't tell you whether it was for the 119 or the 150. Couldn't tell you which radio is UHF, HF, or VHF either. I'm pretty bad with all that stuff.


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