Medical Discharge/Retirement Information?
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  1. #1

    Medical Discharge/Retirement Information?

    Hello all. I have visited this forum many times and I appreciate the great information and support (maybe I should say MOTO) I find here.

    My son graduated from Boot June 20, 2008, MCRD, Kilo Co. He injured his hip during Crucible and after a bone scan to rule out a fracture, they diagnosed him with tendonitis. After his 10-day leave he returned to MCRD, BMP for Physical Therapy.

    The pain got worse, so they did an MRI a few weeks ago and discovered he had a tear in his hip cartilage. At first the doc said he could perform arthroscopic surgery, which has a shorter recovery time. Then last week the doctor decided to do more tests because he suspected a bone spur in the hip. If so, that means they will have to open my son up, and the recovery time would be 6 months to a year. However, the recovery should be complete.

    My son loves being a Marine and hoped to make a career of it. He is terrified they will discharge him.

    He has not, of course, completed MCT or MOS. His job path is data communications.

    Does anyone have any experience with this sort of situation? Is it likely they will discharge him for this?

    Also, I have found many links to the Marine Corps Separation and Retirement Manual, but none of the links work anymore. If anyone has a working link, I would appreciate it if you could share it with me. Thanks again.


  2. #2

    Medical Problems

    My prayers to your son for his perfect and normal health.

    If you use "Google" on your computer - try looking up
    Hip Surgery - bone spurs, torn cartilage, surgical options and inform yourself. Better yet, the doctors should give your son a written report of his problem and proposed
    surgical fix (if necessary).

    I had surgery several times by Navy/Army orthopedic surgeons, and they were wonderful and highly skilled and trained. The whole medical team is I am sure.

    If your son is injured so severely from his initial injury and his surgery, he will be taken care of very well by the Navy Medical System and Retirement System. The VA is wonderful also. My disability check arrives on time perfectly each month (it has been twenty five years since my discharge) and the care I get for everything I need from the VA doen't cost a penny.

    My best thoughts to you and your son, Tom Murray


  3. #3

    Thank you!

    Your words of encouragement and the information is much appreciated, Tom.


  4. #4
    If your son is stationed in the San Diego area they have a great Naval Hospital there. They have great surgeons there and if they can't figure it out they will get a civilian doc who working along with the military docs will find the problem and remedy it.


  5. #5
    If your son has to have surgery...I would venture to say although no expert that the problem would lie not with the removal but the after effects of what happens next....if they can give him rehab and the sawbones believe that he is fit for duty he may go back to his unit and graduate and go on to school and the fleet. If not able to have a successful rehabilitation then I concur with SSGT TMM54 assessment.Good luck!
    Military Medical Standards for Enlistment & Commission

    LOWER EXTREMITIES




    The disqualifying medical conditions are listed below. The International Classification of Disease (ICD) codes are listed in parentheses following each standard.
    The causes for rejection for appointment, enlistment, and induction (without an approved waiver) are an authenticated history of:


    a. Limitation of motion. An individual will be considered unacceptable if the joint ranges of motion are less that the measurements listed below. Methods of measurement appear in TC 8-640.


    • (1) Hip (due to disease (726.5), injury (905.2)):

      • (a) Flexion to 90 degrees.
        (b) No demonstrable flexion contracture.
        (c) Extension to 10 degrees (beyond 0 degrees).
        (d) Abduction to 45 degrees. (e) Rotation of 60 degrees (internal and external combined).
      (2) Knee (due to disease (726.6), injury (905.4)):

      • (a) Full extension compared with contralateral. (b) Flexion to 90 degrees.
      (3) Ankle (due to disease (726.7), injury (905.4)):

      • (a) Dorsiflexion to 10 degrees. (b) Planter flexion to 30 degrees.
      (4) Subtalar (due to disease (726.7) or injury (905.4)): eversion and inversion (total to 5 degrees).
    b. Foot and ankle.

    • (1) Absences of one or more small toes (895) if function of the foot is poor or running or jumping is prevented; absence of a foot (896) or any portion thereof except for toes.
      (2) Absence of great toe(s) (895); loss of dorsal/plantar flexion if function of the foot is impaired (905.4).
      (3) Deformities of the toes, either acquired (735) or congenital (755.66), including polydactyly (755.02), that prevent wearing military footwear or impair walking, marching, running, or jumping. This includes hallux valgus (735).
      (4) Clubfoot or Pes Cavus (754.5), if stiffness or deformity prevents foot function or wearing military footwear.
      (5) Symptomatic pes planus, acquired (734) or congenital (754.6) or pronounced cases, with absence of subtalar motion.
      (6) Ingrown toenails (703), if severe.
      (7) Planter fascitis (728.7), persistent. (8) Neuroma (355.6), confirmed condition and refractory to medical treatment or will impair function of the foot.
    c. Leg, knee, thigh, and hip.

    • (1) Loose or foreign bodies within the knee joint (717.6).
      (2) Physical findings of an unstable or internally deranged joint (717.9). History of uncorrected anterior (717.83) or posterior (717.84) cruciate ligament injury.
      (3) Surgical correction of any knee ligaments if symptomatic or unstable (P81).
      (4) History of congenital dislocation of the hip (754.3), osteochondritis of the hip (Legg-Perthes disease) (732.1), or slipped femoral epiphysis of the hip (732.2).
      (5) Hip dislocation (835) within 2 years before examination. (6) Osteochondritis of the tibial tuberosity (Osgood-Schlatter disease) (732.4), if symptomatic.
    d. General.

    • (1) Deformities (905.4), disease or chronic pain (719.4) of one or both lower extremities that have interfered with function to such a degree as to prevent the individual from following a physically active vocation in civilian life or that would interfere with walking, running, or weight bearing, or the satisfactory completion of prescribed training or military duty. (2) Shortening of a lower extremity (736.81) resulting in a noticeable limp or scoliosis.
    Derived from Department of Defense (DOD) Directive 6130.3, Physical Standards for Appointment, Enlistment, and Induction, and DOD Instruction 6130.4, Criteria and Procedure Requirements for Physical Standards for Appointment, Enlistment, or Induction in the Armed Forces


  6. #6
    Proud Mom:
    Suggest to your son to see a chiropractor. Most large naval hospitals and VA hospitals have a chiropractor on the staff.

    I suggest this because of my own personal experiences, and also because I am in the second year of my doctoral degree education as a chiropractor.

    I went to one because I was near death, and the heart surgeries (12) and the medicine (handfuls) had not worked, and I could not walk or use my right arm. Had not worked for over a year.

    My own "Proud Mom" took me to her chiropractor, and in three months, I could walk and breathe again, and I asked him for a job.
    The good Doc helped me go back to school, get a degree, and go to chiropractic college. I am going to help veterans and Marines that are sick like I was.

    In any event, your son is in great hands. His NCO's and especially the Staff NCO's will make sure of it. My guys were really the only people that I had that were valuable, and the SNCO's over me when I was a PFC and LCPL and Cpl watched over me like a hawk guarding their treasures. That is the Marine Corps way, Proud Mom.

    Best thoughts, Tom


  7. #7

    I could use some help

    Hello I am PFC Richardson, and I could use a bit of assistance. I joind the Marine Corps in September of 2008. During field week of the second stage of Recruit Training I tripped and fell with a full fighting load on. The result was an injured PCL of my right knee. I held off medical attention and bared through the pain untill i got to the fleet in March of 2009. But I am now getting the run around by the medical system. The problem is I love the Corps but I deem myself unfit for duty. I am an Infantry Assaultman and rely on my legs for everything under the sun. I've been through physical therapy and I am finally schedualed for an evaluation by an Orthopedic Surgon but even if I get set up for surgery I wont be recovered in time for the deployment in May, I haven't had one single day of fleet training, and on top of that even whenever I get better I'm not even sure if I'll have the confidence to trust that knee for years to come. All I really to do is go home and resume the life I once had. A good paying job(that still today wants me back), my family, and friends. If there's any advice anyone could give me it would be very much appreciated.

    thank you for your time
    PFC Richardson


  8. #8
    Marine Free Member FistFu68's Avatar
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    I Fought against My Medical Discharge after being Seriously Wounded.Joined for three years and actually did a full five,after being laid up I fought 2 keep my Jump status up The Major running tha Show was not 2 Happy,but Major General C.D.Mize or Mise Sorry General,it's been a very long time said If I could pass the PFT I was good 2 Go.Then they put Velcro on My Chevrons (lol) But while in Uniform I always gave a 110%,I cried the Day I was discharged on Dec.7-1972.


  9. #9
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    pfc knees

    My son is a PFC who just got done at SOI 22 January and was moved to the fleet , on his first run he was sick and was falling out of the run and stepped into a pot hole ankle deep and mess up his knee's , first the corp's men blew him off and after a phone call he was seen by the senoir corp men , my question is would the Marines fix his knee if he really messed it up , he does have a long history of martial arts and holds two black belts .and is also an Eagle Scout also he had told me the corps man said he might have torn cartlage in his knee and sent him for x-rays ,and if it was torn it's an easy fix he's infantry so he will always be on his feet , my question is can they or will they fix him up and could he stay in the infantry ,this has been his life long dream to be a Marine .thanks for any advice


  10. #10

    Knee damage

    Quote Originally Posted by pfcdad View Post
    My son is a PFC who just got done at SOI 22 January and was moved to the fleet , on his first run he was sick and was falling out of the run and stepped into a pot hole ankle deep and mess up his knee's , first the corp's men blew him off and after a phone call he was seen by the senoir corp men , my question is would the Marines fix his knee if he really messed it up , he does have a long history of martial arts and holds two black belts .and is also an Eagle Scout also he had told me the corps man said he might have torn cartlage in his knee and sent him for x-rays ,and if it was torn it's an easy fix he's infantry so he will always be on his feet , my question is can they or will they fix him up and could he stay in the infantry ,this has been his life long dream to be a Marine .thanks for any advice
    If he has torn cartilage, it is any easy fix if you consider surgery easy. I had both my knees operated on (arthroscopic) while in the Corps. Navy orthopedic surgeons do consider this operation very routine. They are, and should be, really good at it as they do so many of them. This is probably the most common injury in the Marine Corps. It hurts like hell for a couple of days after surgery, but the recovery time is short. He should be back full up in about 6 weeks. Tell him to take it very easy after the surgery. If he's doing something that makes it feel anywhere near painful (like running or humping), he must stop it immediately, otherwise things get very difficult as far as the health of his knee. Cartilage tears are rarely career ending, so I'd say he'll be able to stay in the infantry and will be fine if he gives it plenty of time to heal.


  11. #11
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    He' going to the BAS tommorw with the x-rays so we should know some thing soon


  12. #12
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    The doctor said there was nothing wrong with my sons knee , although the PFC did not let the doctor know he had stepped in a pot hole while on a run , My son did tell me that his sargents know he hurt his knee and are watching over him along with his team leader , I hope if the Sargents see him strugling with knee pain they will make him go see the doctor and hopfully he will come clean this time , I'm guessing the Sargents are sort of like his new father and will stongly suggest he get help if needed, he does need some gidence some times and is a little bull headed like his father LOL

    Last edited by pfcdad; 02-02-10 at 07:22 PM. Reason: misspelling

  13. #13
    Our daughter graduated 24 July 2009 and during CMT jumped out of the 7Ton and landed on a rock with her knee. She asked for an MRI beginning in October and FINALLY 22 January she got one......she is STILL waiting to have someone at naval tell her the results..she keeps getting turned away and told to come back....She's scheduled to come home tomorrow for 10 day leave. I had her get the film and report of the MRI.....we have an orthopedist that I'd like to take her to.......my concern....how does that work with the military?? Are we allowed to take her to a civilian doctor??? Will she get into any trouble by seeing this doctor? She's been passed up twice already for MOS and it looks like the third time is looming....she's wanted the Corps since 8th grade......She's scared they'll medsep her....any help, please????


  14. #14
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    Tell your daughter to keep after whom ever she is trying to see , don't let them just push her off , and the last thing the commander ever wants to here is one of his/her Marines is not getting the care they need , have her tell her Sargent about it after going up the chain of command first , it mite not be the best way to handle it but mum can call the BAS your self , although the Marine really will not like it , she should get the phone number and call or go there , you have to make it known that or she has to make it know there is a problem , My son was finally seen by the doctor the x-ray showed nothing although I'm sure there is some minor problem , he puts heat on his knees all the time and uses the sonar at the gum almost ever night and has been doing leg exercises to build up the muscles around the knees and resting when he can


  15. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by pfcdad View Post
    Tell your daughter to keep after whom ever she is trying to see , don't let them just push her off , and the last thing the commander ever wants to here is one of his/her Marines is not getting the care they need , have her tell her Sargent about it after going up the chain of command first , it mite not be the best way to handle it but mum can call the BAS your self , although the Marine really will not like it , she should get the phone number and call or go there , you have to make it known that or she has to make it know there is a problem , My son was finally seen by the doctor the x-ray showed nothing although I'm sure there is some minor problem , he puts heat on his knees all the time and uses the sonar at the gum almost ever night and has been doing leg exercises to build up the muscles around the knees and resting when he can

    I hate to tell you this, but heat is the worst thing you can do for a knee injury. Ice it, ice it, ice it. Heat might feel good, but icing reduces the swelling thereby reducing the pain. Especially after a work out.


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