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  1. #286

    Busses ?

    As I recall, in Nov. 48, we went from the station to the base, in the back of stake-rack trucks, like a load of cattle. FUN,FUN.FUN !! S/F!!! Ken


  2. #287

    Stake Rack Trucks?

    Quote Originally Posted by kenrobg30 View Post
    As I recall, in Nov. 48, we went from the station to the base, in the back of stake-rack trucks, like a load of cattle. FUN,FUN.FUN !! S/F!!! Ken

    Now that's Ol Corps



  3. #288
    I remember stepping on the yellow footprints on 5 Dec '88


  4. #289

    Wooden Barracks !

    Quote Originally Posted by William Hardy View Post
    Believe it or not...It was 43 years ago minus 5 days that I stepped off the bus at PI and on to the yellow footprints. I got there May 15th...actually May 14, but by the time they did their thing and we got inside to begin the paperwork, etc...it was after midnight. And yes, I remember it being hot and humid from day one...not a cool day. I left July 17th if I remember correctly.

    I was in 1st BN last barracks to the far right if you were standing by the Iwo monument. The old white WWII barracks...talk about hot.
    Bill, I've just got to ask. Was that Barracks right on the edge of the swamp? I was in Able Co. That was where we were. We called the swanp 'The Crab Pasture'. Sand fleas, and crabs. I'm getting nostalgic. S/F!!! Ken


  5. #290
    Yes. That was 1st BN. There was a whole row of white WWII barracks on the opposite side of the parade deck from the Iwo monument and the main street. The mess hall was about in the middle. Down on my end it was very close to the swamp. After chow the DI would march us around behind the barracks and and said, "You maggots had your chow. Now the bugs get theirs!" We stood there letting the mosquitoes bite us. Yeah, those were the days. Can't believed I survived. When I was stationed at MCAS Beaufort, I use to drive by all the time when I went to the commissary. One by one the old barracks were coming down until my old barracks became the last one standing. I left Beaufort in 1972 and there were some of those old buildings left, but not many. Back when we were there, 3rd BN was the only one that had the red brick barracks. I couldn't believe how good we had it when we went to the rifle range. The air was actually cool when we went inside. You could lay on the floor and soak up that cold from the concrete. Then we had to return to the wooden buildings with hot linoleum tiles on the floor. Those were the days.

    P.S......try google map and hit satellite!


  6. #291

    Correction

    Quote Originally Posted by riceke View Post
    SSgt Ferrari Head DI, Cpl. Corbit DI
    SDI: SSGT Ferrari, ADI: Sgt Jarrell, ADI: Cpl-SGT Hoffman, Cpl Corbit
    1964 K Company Plt 262 Grad Sept 1964


  7. #292

    Unhappy Parris Island question?

    Since I`m about ready to put my foot where the sun don`t shine in a few knuckleheads at work.....can anybody tell me if and why are new recruits going 3 days without sleep at PI...a mother at work says her son just wrote home and said he went 3 days without sleep and I toold her it`s simply not so...everyone else (none of which have ever been within 500 miles of PI say I`m wrong and that I was in 40 years ago and things have changed,,,I say it doesn`t happen and a former drill instructor friend of me says it doesn`t happen but I got out in 1972 and he about 1978...I know you can`t cuss or put your hand on a recruit but are we depriving them of sleep too?...simply does not make sense...I know we were kept up the first day or so in early 1969 in receiving but that was it...then we got down to training and were deprived of a lot of things but sleep was not one of them...I even put on 30 lbs of muscle at PI...So can a newbie tell what is going on now in receiving?


  8. #293
    Quote Originally Posted by MarineHoo View Post
    Since I`m about ready to put my foot where the sun don`t shine in a few knuckleheads at work.....can anybody tell me if and why are new recruits going 3 days without sleep at PI...a mother at work says her son just wrote home and said he went 3 days without sleep and I toold her it`s simply not so...everyone else (none of which have ever been within 500 miles of PI say I`m wrong and that I was in 40 years ago and things have changed,,,I say it doesn`t happen and a former drill instructor friend of me says it doesn`t happen but I got out in 1972 and he about 1978...I know you can`t cuss or put your hand on a recruit but are we depriving them of sleep too?...simply does not make sense...I know we were kept up the first day or so in early 1969 in receiving but that was it...then we got down to training and were deprived of a lot of things but sleep was not one of them...I even put on 30 lbs of muscle at PI...So can a newbie tell what is going on now in receiving?
    Sounds like an over exaggeration from a boot who needs mamma's attention. During my time in the Corps, there were times when sleep, especially good restful sleep, was not common place during training. Back in my day we did the Elliott's Beach thing...long force march, setting up camp, playing the usually games. I doubt that I got more than a couple of hours all night and not all at one time, and as I recall, the whole thing covered a 2 day period.

    When at Pendleton for pre-deployment training for Nam, the same thing. We got up early one morning, stayed out until about 0300. Some guys hit the shower and some of us laid down in our dirty utilities. About an an hour or so later the platoon sergeant came in yelling for us to get up and get our chow we were moving out. We then did some training all day ending up with the POW thing that night. After dark we were to escape and make our way down the valley to a large fire burning at the ending point. While we waited for darkness and after we ate the rice goulash, most everyone sat around and took a nap until the word was given to escape. The sooner we got back, the sooner the exercise was going to be over. My group made it in about 4 hours..we got lucky and got there about 0100. We laid back and took a nap while we waited for the other to arrive. About 0300 the last guys came in and we were trucked back to the barracks. Needless to say some of the guys had very little sleep in 3 days. No one cared because as soon as we got our equipment cleaned and weapons secured, we were on weekend liberty. Three days not much sleep...all in preparation for Nam. We were not kept up the entire time and oddly, no one yelled at you if you drifted off during class...just a gentle nudge.

    We had little sleep, but not deprived of sleep....all a part of the training.


  9. #294
    Quote Originally Posted by William Hardy View Post
    Yes. That was 1st BN. There was a whole row of white WWII barracks on the opposite side of the parade deck from the Iwo monument and the main street. The mess hall was about in the middle. Down on my end it was very close to the swamp. After chow the DI would march us around behind the barracks and and said, "You maggots had your chow. Now the bugs get theirs!" We stood there letting the mosquitoes bite us. Yeah, those were the days. Can't believed I survived. When I was stationed at MCAS Beaufort, I use to drive by all the time when I went to the commissary. One by one the old barracks were coming down until my old barracks became the last one standing. I left Beaufort in 1972 and there were some of those old buildings left, but not many. Back when we were there, 3rd BN was the only one that had the red brick barracks. I couldn't believe how good we had it when we went to the rifle range. The air was actually cool when we went inside. You could lay on the floor and soak up that cold from the concrete. Then we had to return to the wooden buildings with hot linoleum tiles on the floor. Those were the days.

    P.S......try google map and hit satellite!
    Gunny, when and who were you with at MCAS?
    I was in heavy equipment MABS 32, MAG 32.
    I was there from 1970 -Feb 72.
    I was the Marine that unloaded the first squadron of Harriers for VMA-513. They came in 3 pcs and I would off load them from the Air Force C-141's.


  10. #295
    They have started a program a few years ago called the Crucible. They go for 56 hours with little or no sleep to accomplished a number of obstacles just before graduating Bootcamp.


  11. #296
    Quote Originally Posted by ChuckH View Post
    Gunny, when and who were you with at MCAS?
    I was in heavy equipment MABS 32, MAG 32.
    I was there from 1970 -Feb 72.
    I was the Marine that unloaded the first squadron of Harriers for VMA-513. They came in 3 pcs and I would off load them from the Air Force C-141's.
    Seems we were stationed together and didn't know each other. In 70 & 71 I was with Station Comm Center in the HQ building. I was a brand new SGT just back from Nam. Late in 71 I was transferred to MABS-32 as the Message Center Chief in the HQ building. I worked for Gunner Chase who was the CommO. I was with MABS-32 until early December 1972. I remember the Harriers well. We would stop on the way back from the range and watch them move from one side of the hanger to the other just for practice.

    Semper Fi


  12. #297
    Quote Originally Posted by ronr418 View Post
    They have started a program a few years ago called the Crucible. They go for 56 hours with little or no sleep to accomplished a number of obstacles just before graduating Bootcamp.
    Yes, I recall that, but I didn't know how long the even lasted. 56 hours is a long time, but I am sure they get a wink here and there. Still, 56 hours is a far cry from 72 hours.


  13. #298
    Quote Originally Posted by William Hardy View Post
    Seems we were stationed together and didn't know each other. In 70 & 71 I was with Station Comm Center in the HQ building. I was a brand new SGT just back from Nam. Late in 71 I was transferred to MABS-32 as the Message Center Chief in the HQ building. I worked for Gunner Chase who was the CommO. I was with MABS-32 until early December 1972. I remember the Harriers well. We would stop on the way back from the range and watch them move from one side of the hanger to the other just for practice.

    Semper Fi
    Gunny,
    Talk about a small world... I also played football for MAG 32 for 2 years.. Do you remember that team? We went undefeated for 2 years.
    I was on vacation in Myrtle Beach this last April and rode my harley down to the air station. I had lunch at the Officers club and toured the base... You wouldn't reconize it now... almost eveything has changed... except Base HQ, movie theater, what used to be dispersing, and base supply...
    I was over in J barracks. ALL of those barracks are torn down now and new 4 story "apartments" are there.. even on the land across from what was the enlisted club.
    I too was a fairly new Sgt (6 months) and also had just come back from Nam...


  14. #299
    1stBn, Bravo Co, Plt 1073


  15. #300
    2nd Bn FOX CO. plt.2085
    SDI SSGT.Price
    DI SSGT. Young
    DI SSGT. Deabrouge
    GRAD. Oct.4,2002


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