Squared away uniform tricks... - Page 2
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  1. #16
    Well back in the early '60 we would take our Tropical Shirts and soap the inside on the creases and then iron them on the outside. Made the crease as share as a razor. And talking about A razor .we would take our wool trousers on the ironing board and shave them down so they would be thinner , then turn them inside out and soap the creases and iron them the same way.

    That's how it was done in the OLD CORP.....Semper Fi...Marines


  2. #17
    Kotex in your arm pits to absorb sweat!


  3. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by Diamonds
    Well back in the early '60 we would take our Tropical Shirts and soap the inside on the creases and then iron them on the outside. Made the crease as share as a razor. And talking about A razor .we would take our wool trousers on the ironing board and shave them down so they would be thinner , then turn them inside out and soap the creases and iron them the same way.

    That's how it was done in the OLD CORP.....Semper Fi...Marines
    Just normal bar soap?


  4. #19
    Where do you attach the extra 2 shirt-stays? That HAS to be even more comfortable. I use the ones that go around my heal instead of locking onto the top of the sock.


  5. #20
    Another one I just remembered was using a paperclip on the end of the web belt to help it stay in place. That, and having the first belt loop adjusted to be in the correct place.

    Have the bootcamp issue shirts gotten any better? I was going through my stuff the other day and pulled out one of my creigtons and a boot issue shirt. Man, I can't believe I ever wore one of those paper shirts!


  6. #21
    Whenever you have to place ribbons and badges on your uniform, take a clear piece of ½ inch tape and tape it exactly following the seam line of the pocket. You will then place the ribbons on first on the line of the tape which will be ½ inch. Pull the tape off and then add your badges and you will be perfect.


  7. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by GolfingJarhead
    Another one I just remembered was using a paperclip on the end of the web belt to help it stay in place. That, and having the first belt loop adjusted to be in the correct place.

    Have the bootcamp issue shirts gotten any better? I was going through my stuff the other day and pulled out one of my creigtons and a boot issue shirt. Man, I can't believe I ever wore one of those paper shirts!
    The new ones have fishing line in the shirt to make the creases stay longer ("permanent" creases), but the problem with that is you can't iron it last minute if needed because it will melt the fishing line.


  8. #23
    Marine Free Member Matt Brzycki's Avatar
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    When I was on the drill field in San Diego from 1978-79, some of the DIs used to spray their covers with Scotch Guard. The idea was that in the event of rain, the water would never soak through. Rather, it'd just bead up and run off. Never tried it as I was afraid the Scotch Guard would leave some kinda stain. Some DIs also used to turn their shirts inside out and spray them with Scotch Guard. Here, the idea was that sweat would never show around the pits. One DI used to tell a story where he'd get all Scotch Guarded up (cover, shirt, trousers) then go in the shower and yell at the recruits. He said he stood there under a shower head while it was running and never got wet. This would leave the recruits with dropped jaws.

    Garters were pretty much standard issue. We'd wrap them around our legs so you couldn't see the straps when your legs bent. Was really uncomfortable at first but you got used to it.

    Another thing we used to do is wear our T-shirts backwards (without the tag, of course). The reason was that - at least back then - the front collar of the T used to sag a little. Looked very sloppy. You wear it backwards and the collar was nice and high and never sagged.

    We also used to get our shirts tailored at the waist (and for our short-sleeved shirts, the arms) to make them form-fitting. Sometimes the shirts were so form-fitting that you barely had to blouse them in the back. Dunno if they still do that anymore.

    Matt Brzycki
    Sergeant (1975-79)


  9. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by kbs95125
    The new ones have fishing line in the shirt to make the creases stay longer ("permanent" creases), but the problem with that is you can't iron it last minute if needed because it will melt the fishing line.
    i iron mine and they look crisp


  10. #25
    i'd put starch on my pants and shirts right on the creases and iron them so they'd be sharp, but i messed up plenty of dress uniforms before i got that right.


  11. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by Whitey
    i iron mine and they look crisp
    I never tried to iron mine, but I remember a kid in boot camp had his line melt from the iron. I just bought nicers shirts after boot because the dry cleaner I go to only charges me $30 to clean and press all of my uniforms so I can afford to have them done anytime I need.


  12. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by Matt Brzycki
    When I was on the drill field in San Diego from 1978-79, some of the DIs used to spray their covers with Scotch Guard. The idea was that in the event of rain, the water would never soak through. Rather, it'd just bead up and run off
    Scotch Guard, Camp Dry, Camp Kote and other silicon based products are designed as a topical to prevent stains and leaks. If you wanna turn both rain and sweat, spray both sides of the fabric, complete saturation is an expensive waste unless its Thompson's Water Seal It's what cowboys been using on hats, leather, cotton canvas...for decades. A quality felt hat saturated with TWS until it can hold no more product will take about 4 or 6 days to dry and another few days for the chemical smell to dissipate then your set. The wax is impregnated and will turn rain and sweat day and night for months or years? When its cold the hat will stiffen hard, in the heat the wax tends to soften
    and the hat gets kinda floppy, probably not ideal for a DI. It does all the above with leather boots and tightly woven cotton.

    --->Dave


  13. #28
    Them garters took some getting used to, they make you feel like something bad was going to happen.....a little thing my DI taught was have a tackle box full of extra's...ribbons,chevrons,belt buckles stuff like that....never wore the belt I wore with cammies with charlies and stuff...I wound up having a whole seperate set of clothing just for inspections...


  14. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by Matt Brzycki View Post
    When I was on the drill field in San Diego from 1978-79, some of the DIs used to spray their covers with Scotch Guard. The idea was that in the event of rain, the water would never soak through. Rather, it'd just bead up and run off. Never tried it as I was afraid the Scotch Guard would leave some kinda stain. Some DIs also used to turn their shirts inside out and spray them with Scotch Guard. Here, the idea was that sweat would never show around the pits. One DI used to tell a story where he'd get all Scotch Guarded up (cover, shirt, trousers) then go in the shower and yell at the recruits. He said he stood there under a shower head while it was running and never got wet. This would leave the recruits with dropped jaws.

    Garters were pretty much standard issue. We'd wrap them around our legs so you couldn't see the straps when your legs bent. Was really uncomfortable at first but you got used to it.

    Another thing we used to do is wear our T-shirts backwards (without the tag, of course). The reason was that - at least back then - the front collar of the T used to sag a little. Looked very sloppy. You wear it backwards and the collar was nice and high and never sagged.

    We also used to get our shirts tailored at the waist (and for our short-sleeved shirts, the arms) to make them form-fitting. Sometimes the shirts were so form-fitting that you barely had to blouse them in the back. Dunno if they still do that anymore.

    Matt Brzycki
    Sergeant (1975-79)

    I used to do all of those things. I especially liked standing in the showers as a 3rd. HAT and stressing out my pigs! They worked great

    DI/SDI Sgt. Printz MCRD PI 1st. Rec. Trn. Bn. A Co./C Co. 1988-1990


  15. #30
    Squad Leader Free Member Big Jim's Avatar
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    I Stood Many A Cg's Inspection With Junk On The Bunks With 782 Gear And Weapon...all I've Heard The Tricks Being Mentioned Here But What I Haven't Heard Is About The Boot Heels. I Remember A Sgt. Major Who Inspected Me Along With A Lt.col....he Put My Spit-shined-by Hand Boots On A Small Table And Rolled A Pencil Underneather The Heel Because The Heel Was Wore Down Some. The Sgt. Major Looked At Me And Showed Me The Boot Heels And Said, "these Boots Are Unserviceable, Cpl.!! You Need New Boots!!" And Of Course everyone was Gigged For Irish Pennants!! Not One Marine Got Through That Inspection Gig-free!!!

    The Point Is...keep You Boot Heels Fresh And New...especially If Your Standing A Cg Inpsection!! I Learned After That One To Buy All New And Wear The Stuff Just A Bit And Leave It All Alone And Keep It Just For Inspection!!! You Don't Want To Display Brand New Equipment.


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