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  1. #16
    Now that I've read my post again it sounds kind of bad. I do not think I am now a Marine nor will I be when I ship to San Diego. I realize that becoming a Marine is a 13 week process filled with pain. I just enlisted and I am slightly still nervous about my choice. I will go through with it and I know it will the best thing for me. I just know that some people can't hack it and I don't want to be one of those people. My statements were more an effort to calm myself down and think positively that 'Yes! Even though it will be hell you will make it.' I have confidence in myself but I know boot camp will probably be the toughest thing I'll ever do. I do apologize if my post seemed to be detracting from all of you and your successful graduation from boot camp. I would end this with "Semper Fi!" but I'd get blasted for not having earned that phrase so I'll just think it instead.


  2. #17
    Registered User Free Member JChristin's Avatar
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    You are on the right track Oxaric. Becoming a Marine is one of the toughest things I have ever done. There were a few times I wanted to toss in the towel and leave boot. I came from a modeling background. Joined the Marine Corps after a failed romance. I mean, where does one go after a failed romance? The foreign leagion, right?

    Once I arrived at Parris Island, once I noted the changes in my peers, once I started to really feel the changes in myself, of becoming part of something far greater than self, learning to push myself beyond my limits - I mean really pushing myself beyond, I feel head over in love with the Marine Corps. The person who walked in a scared young girl and marched out a fully grown woman.

    You will do just fine. Keep your eyes on the prize, keep your mind set on graduation, and work your a$$ off to earn our title, and you will do just fine. It will turn into an experience you will talk about the rest of your life.


    semper fi,
    jchristin


  3. #18
    Originally posted by JChristin
    [B]

    But then again, I'm just one of those old western stubborn mules,


    Sorry to hear that! We take pride in mules here in Missouri.

    They're no good for breeding of course but they sure can work.




  4. #19
    Oxaric,

    The Marine Corps you will meet will probally be much different then you preceived it would be.

    There will be little time to think of "becoming a Marine" or "earning the title."

    You will find your head spinning and your body moving with the commands of your Drill Instructors.

    They expect you to do it NOW, do it Right and then do it Again!

    Keep your mouth shut, your eyes and ears open, sound off when asked a question, give every demand your very best shot and who knows, you might make it.

    I think YOU know.

    The best to you!


  5. #20
    firstsgtmike
    Guest Free Member
    Oxaric,

    Ok. Let's talk.

    I was a Recruiter, not a Drill Instructor, but I'll tell you what I know, and hopefully someone else will add more specifics.

    Swimming. There is not that much time to teach swimming in boot camp. Essentially you are tested and are tagged as either a qualified or non-qualified swimmer. No problem there. EXCEPT if you demonstrate a hysterical fear of water. If they can't calm you down, you have more of a mental problem than they want to deal with.

    Rifle Range. I would say that less than 2 % fail to qualify and usually it's because of nervousness they did something stupid on qualification day when they were adusting their sights. Not a reason to be dropped.

    You are given an initial physical fitness test, with bare minimum requirements. If you cannot meet the minimum, you may be sent to a Special Training Platoon.

    STP has four sections; Grossly overweight, underweight or understrength recruits are sent there because they need more individual attention than a regular boot platoon can offer. Once they have reaced an acceptable level, they are assigned to a regular boot platoon.

    The fourth section of STP is the motivation platoon. This section is for extremists; extreme "mama's boys" who lay down, kick their heels in the ground and cry for mama to save them; or extreme wise-asses or pig-heads, or those who tried to "escape".

    Notice I said "extreme". The Drill Instructor can handle about 98% of the recruits assigned to him, but there remains about 2% that he doesn't have time to play with at the expense of the rest of the platoon.

    In my years on Recruiting Duty, I only had 3 that did not graduate and become Marines.

    Most Recruiters have training programs, get togethers, and pt programs for their poolees. Check it out.

    Also, spend much time in the two poolee forums here. Read EVERY post and follow the threads. You'll meet Poolees, soon to be's, and wannabees. They all have or had the same fears, problems, and questions that you have. You're not unique, not yet, not until you earn the title Marine.

    Here's something to try. Visualize 99 guys that you know or have seen at school, interschool functions, uptown, downtown or where ever. Grade each one and give them a number grade from 1 to 100. Then give your self a grade. Where do you stack up. Top 20%, bottom 20%? Top 30%, bottom 30%? Be honest with yourself.

    Then, getting your inspiration from the poolee forums, start working out, mentally and physically. Every two weeks, grade yourself again.

    Do that, and I promise you; When you come back from MCRD and check your grade one more time, you'll be in the top 5%.

    Now, what are you sitting on your butt waiting for? You're at your computer, start reading some of the other poolee posts.


  6. #21
    Registered User Free Member JChristin's Avatar
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    Originally posted by greensideout







    They're no good for breeding of course but they sure can work.

    That's a basic difference between a mid-west mule and a west-coast mule, especially an Oregon mule. Oregon mules are strong, can carry a pack through any climate, have a tough hide and can endure any weather, will climb any mountain - complaining all the way - but loving it all the same. An Oregon mule can swim through any current of water, no matter how heavy the pack or demanding its master. Oregon mules have character, grace and beauty.

    So tell me Greensideout, when is "turnip" day in Missouri?


    semper fi,
    jchristin


  7. #22
    Thank you for all the posts! I am feeling better about my decision now and I am no longer nervous about it. I know I can make it. In 10 months I should be a Marine. If only it was sooner.


  8. #23
    Stick around, read. listen and learn, you'll be ahead of everyone in recruit training when ya get there.

    Most of what yer ever gonna need to know is here. It's just a matter of readin'. I know, it sounds like work, but you'll get use to it!

    Ya do some readin' and hae any questions, let us know. Some of the other POOL-ees who've been around here for awhile can help some, too. They've supported one another pretty well, I think.


  9. #24
    Ok, I got a question.... I'm 17, in pretty good shape and I want go in the Marines. Should I do the Delayed Enlistment or wait?


  10. #25
    Depends on yer situation. Ya discuss it with yer family, talk to a recruiter, and see what is best for you right now.

    We've got a load of information on the site for ya. You can learn a lot here. Take a look at the POOL-ee Hall and Marine Mentor forums first. Might be some stuff that'll lead ya to re-think yer strategy. Lots of options available. That's why it's best to talk to yer local recruiter if ya can. They'll be current and be able to visit with ya face to face.

    I'll see if I can get one of our active duty recruiters to answer yer question a bit better maybe.


  11. #26
    firstsgtmike
    Guest Free Member
    Patrick,

    I would suggest the Delayed Enlistment Program. Recruiting stations have special programs set up for poolees and you will meet others who have made the same committment that you did.

    I can see no benefit in waiting, EXCEPT, if you use your time wisely and get with the right materials you may increase your test scores.

    Talk to your local Recruiter.


  12. #27
    Ya, I'm really eager to go. I want to go so bad I can taste it.


  13. #28
    Registered User Free Member JChristin's Avatar
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    Patrick,

    If you can taste it, then the food is found at your nearest Recruiting Station. First time I walked inside one of those, I felt as if my head was spining. It was. But wait till boot! If you have the warrior instinct, want to do something postive with your life, and think...I mean...think you got the guts, get to it. Decisions are easy to make, its the follow thorough that proves worth.

    Now go, get down to the Recruiting Station and tell all of us what the experience was like.


    semper fi,
    jchristin
    000,000,001


  14. #29
    Marine Free Member Sixguns's Avatar
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    Arrow Whatever......

    "I never laid down during that time of challenge. Being new around here then, I thought you all were like that!" -- JChristin


    Being new around here we weren't sure if you were brain dead or just annoyingly aggrevating. Either way, I think you'll be found guilty!!!


  15. #30
    Patrick8605,

    I was 17 when I joined the Corps. Just a farm kid looking for a chance to do something exciting, to see some other countries and drive a tank.

    Well, I didn't get to drive a tank. Because of my test scores my recruiter pushed me into aviation. I just thought, he knows best and I'll go with that.

    Well, I have to say that my time in the Corps was one of the best times in my life! Sitting in the door of a helo or back seat in an observation fixed wing with the finest aviators in the world is a feeling that can only be had by doing it! Oooo-Rawww

    Take the advice here that you have been reading. Learn all that the Marines do and then pick from that what you want to do. Talk to your recruiter about how you can get there---to what you want to do.

    You will have to study, bend books, read this site and accept advise to reach your goal.

    I was 17 when I joined, worked for me.

    Make sure that it works for you!

    Best to you!


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