National Defense Service Medal - Page 3
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  1. #31
    Marine Free Member FistFu68's Avatar
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    EARNING THE EAGLE,GLOBE AND ANCHOR SPEAKS 4ITSELF.PLUS MEDALS DON'T FEED THE BULLDOG


  2. #32

  3. #33
    Yeah, now they give out ribbons for sea service, overseas service, next they'll be giving them out for boot camp like the Air Force does. I served 4 yrs and 3 mos during and after the Korean war with two years overseas and all I came back with was a good conduct medal and a National Defense. We had two big flaps during that period but no actual combat with my unit. C'est la Vie!


  4. #34
    Marine Free Member PaidinBlood's Avatar
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    Cool come on

    Quote Originally Posted by egbutler1 View Post
    I think i got a fare amount for what i did in the corps and one CerCom for actions in Combat, thats bout it so i'm not stacked but thats pretty standerd for an 0311 these days.

    1 CAR
    1 GWOTSM
    1 GC
    1 OIF
    2 SDSea
    1 NDSR

    Cpl Butler is 100% right-this is a pretty standard package, barring Purple Hearts (God willing) and NAM/NavyComs. Why is everyone so mad? Is it like generations past? Guess not. At least I can tell you each and every award I rate and when I rated it. And at least we don't have the Army's gay ass rainbow ribbon





  5. #35
    I only have the four myself. Good Conduct W/1 star, NDSM, Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal, and Sea Service Deployment Ribbon W/1 star. I was in the Air Wing and did two separate West Pacs'. I do remember on my second West Pac we rated a Marine Corps Expeditionary medal but they told us if we already have the Armed Forces Ex. we did not rate it. I thought that was a bit funny because it is two separate awards. Oh well I never really looked into it.


  6. #36
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    I did pretty good for my four yrs, I have 11


  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by oifvet23 View Post
    I did pretty good for my four yrs, I have 11

    NAM, NUC, MUC, GCON, NATD, AFEM, IFM, GWOTE, GWOTS, AFSM, SSD


  8. #38
    You guys see what I have, but that's for service in 3 different branches since 1982. (Minus the gay rainbow ribbon and army NCO school, and Air Force 'longevity' ribbon, which they use instead of service stripes) I can well understand the Pre-Vietnam Marines looking at all of us since then with a ton of ribbons and just shaking their heads. Guys who had serious combat time in WWII in muliple island campaigns came home with, usually 3 ribbons; Asiatic Pacific Campaign, American Campain (for stateside service) and the WWII victory medal. Now, some also got the PUC and NUC, but that was usually about it.

    The army didn't do much else, either, usually just the European Campaign, and the same last two.

    Korean war vets normally came back with at least 3 ribbons, National Defense, Korean War Service, and UN Service.

    Those who served 'between the wars' didn't get much in the way of ribbons and medals. Just the way it was.


  9. #39

    Irr Nsdm ???

    Would someone please correct me if I'm wrong. Marines in the IRR (Individual Ready Reserve) are eligible for the National Defense Service Medal ? For example, if you were discharged from active duty on August 1, 1990 but yet you IRR obligation wasn't fulfilled until August 1, 1994 you'd qualify for the NSDM ? From everything I've read it looks like you would be, as the IRR is included in the Selected Reserve Category.


    National Defense Service Medal

    Eligibility Dates

    Honorable Service -- Active and Selected Reserve Duty:

    June 27, 1950 through July 27, 1954
    January 1, 1961 through August 14, 1974
    August 2, 1990, through November 30, 1995
    September 11, 2001 -- no closing date at this time



    Definition of Selected Reserve

    Four major categories of resources are Ready Reserve, Standby Reserve, Retired Reserve and Retired Regular

    a. Ready Reserves: Consists of Selected Reserve and members of the Individual Ready Reserve (IRR).

    (1) Selected Reserves: Units and Individual Mobilization Augmentees (IMA's) of the Ready Reserve. Have priority for training and equipment. All Selected Reservists are in an active status.

    (a) Guard/Reserve Units. Units manned and equipped to serve and/or train either as operational or as augmentation units.

    (b) Individual Mobilization Augmentee (IMA): An Air Force Ready Reservist assigned to a specific position within the active force which the reservist would assume upon mobilization or call- up.

    (2) Individual Ready Reserve (IRR): Members of the Ready Reserve

    who are not assigned to the Selected Reserve and who are not on active duty. It is a manpower pool principally consisting of individuals who have had training and who have served previously in the active component

    or in the Selected Reserve and have some period of their military service obligation remaining. In addition there are some individuals in the IRR voluntarily, for hardship or in special non-pay programs that provide a variety of professional assignments and opportunities to earn retirement points and military benefits.


    (a) Trained individuals- Members of the IRR who are judged to be trained and available for mobilization. Includes those members leaving active duty or transferred from the Selected Reserve within 1 Year.

    (b) Untrained Individuals- Members of the IRR who are not locatable and any other member whose status is not known or whose mobilization probability is uncertain.

    (c) In Training- also includes personnel who are participating in officer training programs or in the Armed Forces Health Scholarship program.

    b. Standby Reserve: May only be ordered to active duty involuntarily in time of war or national emergency declared by Congress. It consists of personnel who maintain their military affiliation with being in the Ready Reserve, who have been designated key civilian employees or who have a temporary hardship or disability. These individuals are not required to perform training and are not part of units. They would generally be mobilized to fill manpower needs in specific skills.



  10. #40

    National Defense Service Medal Eligibility

    Howdy, Marine!

    My knowlege is a bit rusty and goes back to Parris Island in 1969. I was told that Marines who served on active duty for 180 days or more were eligible. 180 days was a magic number for a lot of things. Back in that period, Marine reservists went through the necessary Recruit Training, ITR, MOS schooling, etc. This would take longer than 180 days so these reservists were eligible for the National Defense Medal.

    I hope that helps.
    Semper-Fi


  11. #41
    When I went through boot camp it was 90 days for eligibility for the firewatch ribbon. I got out after 8 years 3 months and 21 days wearing the firewatch ribbon and the Good Conduct medal (2nd award) My NUC was awarded to a unit I was in after I left it but I happened to be there during the period of eligibility and only found out about the award when I requested my service records a few years ago....


  12. #42

    The Firewatch Medal

    @Camper51

    Well Marine, it appears there is life to this thread!

    I cannot say Aye or Nay to your 90 day rule, but SoapO now has two good tidbits to chew on!

    I did not call it a Firewatch Medal in this thread. That is what we called it, however, back in the '60s. I did not want to sound like I was belittling it!

    My father was awarded the American Defense Medal for his service in the US Coast Guard (North Africa, Sicilly, Normandy) during WWII and then the National Defense medal for his service in the US Navy during the Korean War.

    My uncle was awarded the American Defense Medal for his service in the US Army in WWII. (Guadalcanal, Phillipines).

    We may call this the "Firewatch Medal". Certainly it means less than an award for valor. Yet this award means something!

    During the 1960s, people could avoid this award.
    1. They could come up "Sick, Lame, or Lazy"!
    2. They could say they "wet the bed"!
    3. They could say they "Liked" people of the same sex (Worked for Van Johnson in WWII).
    4. They could go to another country for the duration.

    For the rest of us, we showed up when we were supposed to! I don't know about you but I "Beat the Draft" by enlisting.

    While the "National Defense Medal" may seem like a lowly award, most of our "Fellow Americans" do not qualify for it. Those of you who qualify for it are special!

    Never forget that!

    Gung-Ho!


  13. #43
    You need to fill out your profile.


  14. #44
    Quote Originally Posted by Native Warrior View Post
    It's not that I need another item on my salad bar, it just irks me that the MC is handing out ribbons now almost as easy as the other branches, when for so long it was tough to get anything other than GCM. I remember getting back from Lebanon and Grenada with 9 ribbons and having E-7 and up *****ing about it and asking for proof that I was entitled to them. Now seems like anyone with a year or more of service is wearing a full service salad buffet.

    Besides, as a Marine we don't need ribbons or medals to validate our worth and purpose to America, its people or to the world. We get that validation in our daily life both internal and externally.
    I will agree with you, it does seem as if the MC is just giving them away, I still think the army tops the cake for giving out ribbons/medals. an e-3 with 2 years in had around 8 for a single deployment that just doesn't seem right to me.


  15. #45
    Quote Originally Posted by SoapO View Post
    Would someone please correct me if I'm wrong. Marines in the IRR (Individual Ready Reserve) are eligible for the National Defense Service Medal ? For example, if you were discharged from active duty on August 1, 1990 but yet you IRR obligation wasn't fulfilled until August 1, 1994 you'd qualify for the NSDM ? From everything I've read it looks like you would be, as the IRR is included in the Selected Reserve Category.


    National Defense Service Medal

    Eligibility Dates

    Honorable Service -- Active and Selected Reserve Duty:

    June 27, 1950 through July 27, 1954
    January 1, 1961 through August 14, 1974
    August 2, 1990, through November 30, 1995
    September 11, 2001 -- no closing date at this time


    Definition of Selected Reserve

    Four major categories of resources are Ready Reserve, Standby Reserve, Retired Reserve and Retired Regular

    a. Ready Reserves: Consists of Selected Reserve and members of the Individual Ready Reserve (IRR).

    (1) Selected Reserves: Units and Individual Mobilization Augmentees (IMA's) of the Ready Reserve. Have priority for training and equipment. All Selected Reservists are in an active status.

    (a) Guard/Reserve Units. Units manned and equipped to serve and/or train either as operational or as augmentation units.

    (b) Individual Mobilization Augmentee (IMA): An Air Force Ready Reservist assigned to a specific position within the active force which the reservist would assume upon mobilization or call- up.

    (2) Individual Ready Reserve (IRR): Members of the Ready Reserve

    who are not assigned to the Selected Reserve and who are not on active duty. It is a manpower pool principally consisting of individuals who have had training and who have served previously in the active component

    or in the Selected Reserve and have some period of their military service obligation remaining. In addition there are some individuals in the IRR voluntarily, for hardship or in special non-pay programs that provide a variety of professional assignments and opportunities to earn retirement points and military benefits.

    (a) Trained individuals- Members of the IRR who are judged to be trained and available for mobilization. Includes those members leaving active duty or transferred from the Selected Reserve within 1 Year.

    (b) Untrained Individuals- Members of the IRR who are not locatable and any other member whose status is not known or whose mobilization probability is uncertain.

    (c) In Training- also includes personnel who are participating in officer training programs or in the Armed Forces Health Scholarship program.

    b. Standby Reserve: May only be ordered to active duty involuntarily in time of war or national emergency declared by Congress. It consists of personnel who maintain their military affiliation with being in the Ready Reserve, who have been designated key civilian employees or who have a temporary hardship or disability. These individuals are not required to perform training and are not part of units. They would generally be mobilized to fill manpower needs in specific skills.

    So, If I read this right, I would be eligible for this as well...
    Interesting.


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