Doing the right thing
Create Post
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 26
  1. #1

    Doing the right thing

    Hi, I'll be straightforward here. I did something that I'm not proud of, and regardless of what my recruiter tells me to do about it, I'm gonna tell the doctors at MEPS in order to avoid complications with my career later on.

    It goes like this. I was asked to leave my university for a violation of the student code of conduct. I became angry with two of my friends, and they felt threatened enough by me that I was brought to the ER of the local hospital. A psychologist evaluated me there and told me that I was OK and not a threat to anyone. On his request, I followed this up with another psychologist who told me I was depressed. For the record I didn't lay so much as a finger on anyone.

    I have to come clean about this with my recruiter, but I'm afraid that he'll tell me not to say anything. If that happens I'll be forced to tell the people at MEPS without his support. I'm guessing he'd be pretty angry if I did this, and he's the one in charge of putting together my waiver right? That can't be a good thing

    I DO NOT want to have to spend my time in the Corps. with this thing looming over my shoulder. I just want it over and done with... Thanks for your time


  2. #2
    If you want to be a Marine and your recruiter tells you it will disqualify you, than you are wasting his time by even going to MEPS.


  3. #3
    Yea, the thing is I won't be able to contact him for a while, and just sitting around thinking about this is driving me insane. Honestly, a breach of a university's code of conduct and a psychologist saying I'm depressed (which is completely untrue considering a bunch of qualified people said otherwise off the record) has to be eligible for a waiver. I hope so at least...


  4. #4
    BTW, some of these guys on this site are gonna hammer you on this, also for not having a profile filled out. Best you fill out a profile and take your lumps and listen to what they have to say.


  5. #5
    Profile done. I don't have an excuse for what happened, except that it was blown way out of proportion. All I want to know is that IF I can get a certified doc to say I'm not depressed and provide proof at MEPS, will I even need a waiver?

    And seeing as the other stuff was not serious enough for either the pressing of charges or arrests, am I really in as much trouble as I think I am?

    And thank you for the warning, and your help.


  6. #6
    Sounds like you're leaving something out of that story.


  7. #7
    Squad Leader Free Member Zulu 36's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Crescent City
    Posts
    5,491
    Credits
    14,540
    Savings
    0
    Images
    7
    Well, Mac, situations like yours have been blown out of proportion in many cases at our institutions of "higher learning." Go to http://www.thefire.org/index.php to read some of them. Who knows, FIRE might be able to help you.

    The latest is a guy who got put on "academic probation" for "hazing" at a community college. His crime? He e-mailed other students about his intention to drop a course and invited others to join him at a different school to take a similar (presumably better) course. There is a bit more to the story than that, but too long for here.

    Stop eating yourself up. Tell the recruiter. He won't kill you (probably), so what's the problem? You aren't the first kid ever to join the Corps after getting kicked out of college. We're kind of like the American version of the French Foreign Legion sometimes.

    If you can get a mental health professional to say you're OK, there should be no problem. If you weren't on meds, so much the better.

    Also, off-the-record diagnoses do not count. If they won't put it in writing, their opinion isn't worth the paper it's printed on.


  8. #8
    Squad Leader Free Member Zulu 36's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Crescent City
    Posts
    5,491
    Credits
    14,540
    Savings
    0
    Images
    7
    Quote Originally Posted by BR03Hopeful
    Sounds like you're leaving something out of that story.
    Thanks BR03. I should have added my concerns too.

    People don't get "taken" to an ER by a couple of friends freshly threatened. They usually get the police involved. Did the campus or local gendarmes take you on an involuntary evaluation commitment?

    If the shrink put you out of the door within a few hours, no big deal. If they held you for several days and held a judicial hearing, it might mean more trouble for you. Not necessarily insurmountable trouble, but more aggravation for you and the recruiter.

    Don't try to BS this forum. There are way too many people here who have been through the mill with depression, PTSD, and worse. Not to mention many cops who have done involuntary commitments, and people who have had their run-ins with the academic a**holes who boss universities. Gee, you got all of that in one package with me.


  9. #9
    Yea, my friends called the police, and I went with them willingly to the ER. The doc talked to me to find out what happened, and confirmed it with my buddies, and then he let me go.


  10. #10
    Squad Leader Free Member Zulu 36's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Crescent City
    Posts
    5,491
    Credits
    14,540
    Savings
    0
    Images
    7
    Quote Originally Posted by Mcgrunt777
    Yea, my friends called the police, and I went with them willingly to the ER. The doc talked to me to find out what happened, and confirmed it with my buddies, and then he let me go.
    Well, if that is the extent of it, there shouldn't be much problem. Tell the recruiter.

    BTW, are they still friends of yours? They did you no favors that night if your account is complete and accurate.


  11. #11
    Well, I still see them as friends, but I don't think they still see me that way. I'd talk to them but I'm afraid if I do they might get the wrong idea.


  12. #12
    Oookay.

    So...you got 'voluntarily' committed, from what it sounds like, for an evaluation. That evaluation basically turned up nothing. You were pizzed off for whatever reason, your friends got upset that you were perhaps going to do something stoopid, and called the police. If they were university cops, they likely t/p you as a precautionary move.

    The big kicker here will be, however, was, WERE you diagnosed as "Depressed", (number one), by competent medical authority, and, (number two...the biggie) WERE you prescribed medication for it?

    If the answer to the first is 'Yes' and it appears on a medical record someplace, you'll need to be re-checked and come up 'negative'.

    If the answer to the second is "Yes", then you won't be able to pass "GO" or do anything else until you are meds free for several years.

    Zulu, well said, good advice.


  13. #13
    I have a quesion here about the medical report...After your meps physical and stuff is that the last thing to be said about your medical history..?


  14. #14
    Usually, unless it becomes an issue. There are numerous people that were discharged months/years later because the fact that they lied to get into the Marine Corps becomes known.


  15. #15
    Yep. And they DO check. But, since it's not right away, or unless a problem is discovered, it takes time. Suffice to say that if you are diagnosed with a problem, or had something medical done, and that issue returns while in SOI or even the fleet....the docs will try and locate your old record if possible. When they do and they discover this previous problem, the wheels will start turning.

    And that is when you get nailed for 'false enlistment' and booted out.


Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not Create Posts
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts