Okay....now I'm a little frustrated...
Create Post
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 18
  1. #1

    Okay....now I'm a little frustrated...

    Just spent the whole day TDE'd from school working with the NROTC liason officer guy? Rep? Whatever his title is. Pretty much they're willing to give me a free ride 4 year scholarship with NROTC (Marine Corps of course) which means in 4 years I'd have brass on my shoulder instead of chevrons (Not saying its better or worse, just saying in general)

    Now, its always been my dream, my ultimate life-long dream to be a commissioned officer. And this would make it alot easier than doing 4 years, then college, then get a commission and start off as a Mustang 2nd Lt at age 26.

    However, there's one thing stopping me. My commitment through DEP. When I told him about this he pretty much acted as if its no big deal, he said "We can work around that, don't worry about it." Now I'm certain that he can, that it would be real easy for him to get me out of DEP and into NROTC next year (I'm a senior)

    But that's not what worries me, I feel like I've got a commitment to my poolee friends. I mean, all 5 of us are shipping the same day as UH. My recruiter too, I mean, my future is more important than making sure she makes mission, but I still have that thing in the back of my mind you know? Its not so much the fact I'd feel like I lied to her, but that I'd be ditching her for something "better", or maybe that she'd think I think "I'm too good to go enlisted". Something like that.

    Me personally, if I went through with this I don't feel as if I'm renouncing my commitment to the Corps at all, because....well I'm still going to join it...so that's not an issue to me.

    But I'm friends with all these guys, we enlisted together, and while I know they'd understand and be happy for me, I mean, they all call me General because of my ASVAB score, class rank, and they say my name sounds like a General's name, I don't know how that would really make them feel knowing that they'd be finished with their first enlistment when I get my commission....they'd be heros and I'd be a college graduate.....

    I know some of you guys like to immediately go into insult-mode, that's not what I'm looking for. I'm most definitely joining the Corps either way, so I'm not getting out. This just has to do with being in DEP and getting accepted to an NROTC program with a 4 year scholarship. How would you feel about that?

    Let me ask you Marines....what would you do? If you were in DEP and someone pretty much just said "Sign here if you want to be an officer" but it meant getting out of DEP?


  2. #2

    Think

    YOU think it over and do whats best for you and where you want to be in the future.


  3. #3
    Marine Free Member Marine84's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Atlanta, GA
    Posts
    6,801
    Credits
    3,496
    Savings
    0
    Images
    3
    It's your life Hoss - do what you feel is right for you..................

    I wish I had known it was that freakin easy to become an officer.


  4. #4
    Id go officer dude.


  5. #5
    proachbass91
    Guest Free Member
    Its not just as easy as "sign here and be a officer" I spend the past three years in FAMU's NROTC unit as a Marine Option. After being in that enviornment I felt I would fit better on the enlisted side. Droped out and entered the DEP. NROTC is not easy, its not hard though either. Depending on what unit you go to you will be PT'ing alot. in addition to regular labs and drill days. At my unit I was there every morning at 0515-0730 Then went to my regular classes and was back at the unit in the afternoon either for mandatory study, more PT, tutoring younger MIDN, preparing for events whatever. And OCS and TBS is no cake walk either. What is your PFT at right now?


  6. #6
    Oh dude, I totally know its not a cake walk. I was just saying that's what he offered, a 4 year scholarship for "signing here". I should have written "Sign here and get a free ride for a chance to be an officer", instead. My mistake.

    And trust me, I'd handle OCS. Never Quit man, this is my life-long goal. Ever seen "Rudy"? That'd be me.

    Oh, and my PFT is...well whatever this is: 100+ situps, 14 pull ups, 3 miles in ~23:30.

    I still have 7 months before I even graduate high school though, and to put those numbers in perspective, in August, the first time doing the IST I did 37 situps, 6 pullups, and 1.5 miles in 15:40.


  7. #7
    What does TDE'd mean?
    Also, it doesnt matter if you never quit in OCS, its not like enlisted boot camp. If your struggling, theyll wash you out.
    What college is this for?


  8. #8
    You realize you can go enlisted then go officer after right? It's not one or the other -- a friend of mine went to MCRD and then went to an officership program as a Sgt. He always said, "I have to know what I'm leading before I lead it." He wanted to experience both.

    In the end it's what you want.

    S/F


  9. #9
    I hate to tell people to back out on something they have sworn to do. (That is what the oath is all about after all.) But, if your ultimate goal is to be an officer, then go for it. NROTC is a good deal, you're getting the scholly, and it is all laid out for you to do. You won't have the same experience as you would if you stuck to your initial plan, but that doesn't make the NROTC experience worth any less.


  10. #10
    Well, tell me this. If I do 0300 for 4 years, get out at say, Cpl or Sgt, and then go to college, OCS, etc. I'll be 26 when I get my commission. Isn't that too old to be a platoon leader?


  11. #11
    There are a countless number of ways to become an officer when you're enlisted, here are just a FEW of the many programs available:

    Marine Corps Enlisted Commissioning Education Program (MECEP): (Active Duty Only)

    This program provides an opportunity for outstanding enlisted men and women on active duty to achieve careers as Marine Corps officers. Marines successfully completing the program receive a baccalaureate degree (four year college/bachelor degree) in an approved area of study.

    Eligibility Requirements. Applicants must meet the physical standards for officer candidates as prescribed in the MANMED, except as modified by MCO 1560.15. Applicants may be either married or single and must be a U.S. citizen. They must be capable of obtaining a satisfactory national agency check and be eligible to receive a SECRET clearance. Applicants must have sufficient obligated service as specified in MCO 1560.15. The following additional eligibility requirements pertain:


    Grade: Cpl or above.
    Age: At least 20 but less than 26 years old by 1 July of the year applying. Waivers will be considered. (Intent is to commission the applicant by age 30.)
    Education: Ranked in the top 50% of their high school graduating class or passed the GED equivalency test with a minimum score of 75% on each test.
    SAT/ACT: Minimum SAT score of 1000 (Combined math & verbal). Waivers considered if applicant has an EL score of 115 or greater.

    Application. Applications will be solicited annually by MCBul 1560 Series. The format for the application will be in accordance with MCO 1560.15. Applications will be submitted to the Commanding General, Marine Corps Recruiting Command (MRON) no later than 31 January of the application year.

    Training. Marines selected for participation in the MECEP will be assigned to the MECEP Preparatory School in San Diego, CA, during early June for approximately ten weeks of instruction in mathematics, English, physics, chemistry or physical science, as appropriate to their areas of interest. (Refer to MCO 1560.15 for exceptions to the MECEP Prep school.) Participants will then be assigned to one of the participating institutions in their current grade with fully pay, allowances (excluding proficiency pay), promotional opportunities, and normal leave. Successful completion of Officer Candidates School is required prior to appointment to second lieutenant.

    ============

    Enlisted Commissioning Program (ECP): (Active Duty and Active Reserve Only)

    This program is intended to provide an opportunity to gain commissioned status as unrestricted Reserve officers. It allows qualified enlisted Marines in the Regular Marine Corps and in the Marine Corps Active Reserve (AR) Program to apply for assignment to Officer Candidates School (OCS) and subsequent appointment to unrestricted commissioned officer grade in the Marine Corps Reserve. Applicants must have satisfactorily earned a baccalaureate level degree from a regionally accredited college or university prior to applying for the program. This program is not intended to serve as a commissioning program for Marines who are better suited to serve as warrant officers. An aviator option is available to qualified applicants.

    ===========

    Meritorious Commissioning Program (MCP): (Active Duty and Active Reserve Only)

    The Meritorious Commissioning Program provides an opportunity to gain commissioned status as unrestricted Reserve officers. This program allows commanding officers the opportunity to nominate qualified enlisted Marines in the regular Marine Corps and the Active Reserve Program, who have demonstrated exceptional leadership potential, for assignment to OCS and subsequent commissioning in the Marine Corps Reserve. Applicants must have satisfactorily earned an associated level degree or completed 60 semester hours or more of unduplicated college work at a regionally accredited college or university. Enlisted Marines possessing a 4-year degree are not eligible for MCP. This program is not intended to serve as a commissioning program for Marines who are better suited to serve as warrant officers. An aviator option is available to qualified applicants.

    Eligibility, Application and Training for ECP and MCP

    Eligibility Requirements. Eligibility requirements are specified in MCO 1040.43. Applicants for either program must be a United States citizen and be of unquestionable moral integrity. They cannot have any record of conviction by a court-martial or a civilian court, other minor traffic violations. The following additional eligibility requirements pertain for both programs:

    Age: Ground candidates must be at least 21 years of age and less than 30 years of age on date of appointment to commissioned grade. Aviation candidates must be at least 21 years of age and less than 27 1/2 years of age on date of appointment to commissioned grade. No waivers will be considered for age requirements.
    Aptitude Test Scores: Must possess either a minimum combined Math and Verbal SAT score of 1000; or a minimum combined Math and English score of 45; or minimum EL score of 115 from the AFCT. Refer to MCO 1040.43 for additional requirements.

    Application. Applications will be submitted in accordance with MCO 1040.43 to formal selection boards convened by the CMC to select the best qualified for commissioning. The formal selection boards will convene three times per year. An annual selection board schedule will be released by ALMAR announcing the application deadlines, board convening dates, and training periods.

    Training. Personnel selected will be assigned to a 10-week officer candidate class at Quantico, Virginia. Candidates who successfully complete OCS and who are recommended by the CG, MCCDC, will be appointed to the grade of second lieutenant in the U.S. Marine Corps Reserve. All officers so appointed will be further assigned to The Basic School for commissioned officer training.

    Service Obligation. All applicants must agree that upon acceptance of a commission to serve at least 8 years in the Marine Corps Reserve from date of appointment to commissioned grade. A minimum of the first 3 1/2 years of that obligation must be served on extended active duty (EAD). Those Marines selected for the aviator option must consent to serve a minimum of 96 months on EAD if trained as a jet pilot and 72 months if trained as a helicopter or fixed wing transport pilot from the date of designation as a Naval Aviator.

    =============

    Enlisted to Warrant Officer Program (WO):

    The Warrant Officer Program is designed to provide to Marine Corps with technical specialists who perform duties that require extensive knowledge of a particular MOS and who can be assigned to successive tours of duty in their primary MOS. Applicants must be technically and professionally qualified to serve in one of the MOS's listed in the current Marine Corps Bulletin 1040 series soliciting applications for the year in which application is made. Qualified Active Duty, SMCR, and AR enlisted Marines are encourage to apply in accordance with MCO 1040.42. Marines selected for the program will be appointed to the grade of Warrant Officer (WO1) as indicated in the Marine Corps Bulletin soliciting applications.

    Eligibility Requirements. Eligibility requirements are specified in MCO 1040.42 and the Marine Corps Bulletin in the 1040 series published annually to solicit applications for the program. All applicants must meet the basic reenlistment prerequisites per MCO P1040.31 (active duty applicants) and MCO P1040R.35 (reserve applicants). The following are a few of the eligibility requirements:

    Grade: Sergeant or above.
    Service: Active Duty - At least 8 years and less than 16 years of active naval service as of date of appointment. SMCR/AR - At least 8 years and less than 20 years of naval service as of the date of appointment.
    Aptitude Test Scores: Either a minimum combined English and math score of 39 on the ACT; or a minimum combined math and verbal score of 900 on the SAT; or a minimum EL score of 110 from the ASVAB/AFCT.

    Application. Applications will be submitted to the Commanding General, Marine Corps Recruiting Command (MROE) in accordance with the guidelines set forth in applicable current Marine Corps bulletins wand references.

    Training. Attend the Warrant Officer Basic Course (WOBC) at Quantico, Virginia.

    ========

    Enlisted to Warrant Officer (Gunner) Program: (Active Duty Only)

    The Gunner program is designed to take qualified applicants from the ranks of the infantry senior staff NCO's and designated them "Marine Gunners". As Infantry Weapons officers, Marines selected will be a source of expertise on all aspects of infantry weapons. "Gunners" are expected to maintain a high degree of expertise by combining consecutive tours in the FMF with occasional training bullets. Due to continual FMF assignment, Marine Gunners should expect to spend a large amount of the time deployed. Selected applicants will be appointed to the grade of permanent CWO2 in MOS 0306.

    Eligibility Requirements. Applicants must meet the basic reenlistment prerequisites per MCO P1040.31. They must have a GT Score of 110 or higher. Refer to MCBul 1040, Enlisted to Warrant Officer (Marine Gunner) Program for additional eligibility requirements.

    Applications. Applications will be submitted to the Commanding General, Marine Corps Recruiting Command (MROE) per the instructions in MCBul 1040, Enlisted to Warrant Officer (Marine Gunner) Program.

    Training. Marines selected will attend the Warrant Officer Basic Course (WOBC) at Quantico, Virginia. Following completion of the WOBC, selectees will attend the Infantry Officer Course and Weapons Instructor course.

    =======

    Selected Marine Corps Reserve Direct Commissioning (SMCRDC) Program: (Reserve Only)

    This program provides an opportunity for enlisted and WO/CWOs of the SMCR and AR marines to gain commissioned status in the Reserve unrestricted officer structure. The SMCRDC is a highly selective program and is not intended to serve as a commissioning program for Marines who are better suited to serve as Staff Noncommissioned Officers or Warrant officers.

    Eligibility Requirements. Eligibility requirements are specified in MCO 1040R.10.

    Applications. Applications will be submitted to the Commandant of the Marine Corps (MROE) anytime per the instructions in MCO 1040R.10.

    Training. Marine selected will attend a 10 week Officer Candidates Course at OCS prior to appointment as a Second Lieutenant in the U.S. Marine Corps Reserve. Subsequent to commissioning, the new officer will be required to attend The Basic School with the exception of those WOs who have already attended either the WO Basic Course or the Reserve WO Basic Course.

    ==========

    So as you can see, with so many programs available for current enlisted Marines to become officers, there's absolutely no reason in the world why you should back out of the DEP to pursue NROTC. You're getting the GI Bill regardless, so your college is paid for no matter what whether you go enlisted or NROTC, and you don't have to wait to get out to go to college for free on the GI Bill because when you're on active duty you get to go to college for free with TA.

    In the past earning a college degree while on active duty in the Infantry was next to impossible, but in the year 2006 with the SOCMAR program which allows active duty personnel to take online college courses anywhere in the world and earn a degree from respected universities, it's very do-able.

    And before you even think of accepting a commission I highly advise you to do some research on how you're picked to receive your MOS when you're at TBS, you won't be very happy when you learn that it's not uncommon for someone to receive their 5th or 6th choice on their wishlist. They divide everything up into 1/3's, so the top 2ndLT's at TBS are spread evenly across all MOS' to maintain quality throughout the entire Corps, rather than all the **** hot officers going Infantry or Intel, the **** hot officers are also given Supply and other things which are less desireable so quality officers are dispersed evenly in all MOS'. When you go enlisted at least you can be guaranteed Infantry, but for officers all you're guaranteed is a job on the ground.

    But personally, i'd rather be a Gunny than an officer.


  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by Achped
    Well, tell me this. If I do 0300 for 4 years, get out at say, Cpl or Sgt, and then go to college, OCS, etc. I'll be 26 when I get my commission. Isn't that too old to be a platoon leader?
    No it's not, Many Marines have done it.


  13. #13
    Marine Friend Free Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Charlottesville
    Posts
    328
    Credits
    10,002
    Savings
    0
    Personally, I'd take the free college ride and become an Officer. If being an Officer of Marines is truly your dream, this NROTC scholarship is probably the fastest way to go about it. Going for the commission isn't in any way a betrayal from your friends - you'll all be Marines! The only difference is that they'll be Marines a little sooner, but the Marine Corps isn't going anywhere anytime soon.

    Trust your gut feelings - what is more important to you? Realising your lifelong dream to become an Officer, or enlisting with your buddies? I understand that this is a seriously tough decision, so take your time and be absolutley sure of your answer before you act on it.

    Good luck bro!


  14. #14
    Marine Friend Free Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Oklahoma City
    Posts
    196
    Credits
    10,003
    Savings
    0
    I would take the NROTC. Not because enlisted are a "lower" people in my mind, but because if your goal is to be an Officer, don't treat an enlistment like it's a "step you have to take" on the way to a commission. If you want to enlist, you should enlist. If you truly want to be an Officer, go straight to it. I always liked what one Officer told me: "Lieutenants get shot at and hump just as much as Enlisted guys."


  15. #15
    Marine Friend Free Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Charlottesville
    Posts
    328
    Credits
    10,002
    Savings
    0
    Hear Hear! Well said Barret.


Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not Create Posts
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts