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  1. #1

    Squid trying to BS me!

    Okay leathernecks,
    Need some info. I have a brother in-law who I believe is a full of total BS. I doubt this guy was even in the service but he claims to have been in the Navy during desert storm and supposedly has kills in ground combat operations. Now I'm not even aware of any Navy combat during that time with the exception of the SEALS, which he was NOT part of. Can anyone point me in a direction (website, documentation etc) to prove this guy is full of it? Much appreciated!
    Allen


  2. #2
    Phantom Blooper
    Guest Free Member
    http://www.history.navy.mil/faqs/faq67-7.htm



    Seabee History: Operations Desert Shield/Desert Storm



    On 2 August 1990 the armed forces of Iraq began the invasion and subsequent conquest of the Emirate of Kuwait. Under United Nations' auspices, the United States and other member nations responded by deploying military forces to Saudi Arabia. The immediate goal was to forestall further Iraqi aggression; the long-range goal was to compel Iraq to withdraw from Kuwait. The initial allied military undertaking to protect Saudi Arabia was dubbed Operation "Desert Shield."


    Among the U.S. forces deployed to the region was the First Marine Expeditionary Force. Seabees were to provide construction support for this force. On 7 August the Seabees began preparations to deploy four battalions to the region: Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 4, 5, 7, and 40. On 13 August the first Seabees arrived in Saudi Arabia, an element of Amphibious Construction Battalion 1, comprising 210 personnel. These men immediately went to work unloading Marine Corps equipment and supplies from Maritime Pre-positioned Force ships.


    During the period 10-20 August, 100 Seabees of Amphibious Construction Battalion 2 departed Norfolk, Virginia, on amphibious ships bound for the Persian Gulf. While in the gulf these Seabees participated in numerous exercises with the Marines to prepare for an amphibious assault in the region.


    The second wave of Seabees to arrive were personnel from Construction Battalion Units 411 and 415; they erected and maintained Fleet Hospital Five, a 500- bed hospital facility at Al Jubail, Saudi Arabia. Both units had female Officers in Charge, marking a first for the Seabees.


    By 14 September the Air Detachments of the four deploying Seabee battalions had arrived. Each comprised 89 men and could operate for 30 days with out resupply. On 27 September NMCB 40's main body arrived in country from Camp Covington, Guam. By 18 October all the battalion main bodies had reached Southwest Asia. NMCB 5 arrived from its home port at the Naval Construction Battalion Center, Port Hueneme, California; and NMCB 4 redeployed from Camp Moscrip, Puerto Rico. NMCB 7 redeployed from Camp Shields on Okinawa, and, unlike the other three battalions, was sent to Bahrain. In December NMCB 24, a reserve unit called to active duty, relieved NMCB 4. That same month, NMCB 5 and 40 were joined by Details 15 and 16 of NMCB 1 which was deployed at Rota, Spain. The 3rd Naval Construction Regiment, a reserve regiment, was mobilized to provide command and control over the deployed battalions. By early February 1991, 2,800 Seabees and 1,375 pieces of equipments had been deployed to the region in support of Operation "Desert Shield."


    Upon their arrival in Saudi Arabia, the Seabees built critically needed facilities at the four airfields where the Marine Air Combat Element had deployed. This entailed construction of parking aprons, as well as base camps to house the Marines pouring into the area. Next, the Seabees built ammunition supply points for the large amounts of ordnance being transported to the region. Once these needs were met, the Seabees shifted emphasis to improving living conditions in the Marine camps.


    Base camps were built for the 3rd Marine Air Wing, Marine Air Groups 11, 13, 16 and 26, and the 1st and 2nd Marine Division. In Bahrain, NMCB 7 supported the Army and Air Force, as well as the Marines. The battalion built strongback tents, an aviation storage facility, a munitions transfer road, and a 60,000 square foot aircraft parking apron. In December, NMCB 74 relieved NMCB 7 in Bahrain, and the latter battalion moved 200 miles north to Ras Al Mishab in Saudi Arabia.


    Among major projects completed during Operation "Desert Shield" were a headquarters complex for the First Marine Expeditionary Force and a 15,000 man camp for the Second Marine Expeditionary Force. The latter project was the largest wartime multi-battalion Seabee project since the Vietnam War. NMCB 1, 4, 5 (project lead), 7, 24, 40 and 74 worked on the project. Construction began in late November. The camp comprised six modules, each capable of housing 2,500 men. Each module contained berthing, office space, showers, toilet facilities, a galley, roads, and parking areas. The completed camp complex was dubbed "Wally World."


    Completing these projects required the Seabees to work seven days a week, two twelve hour shifts a day. The only days off during the whole period of Seabee involvement in the Gulf were Thanksgiving and Christmas. The Gulf environment provided an added challenge for the Seabees. When the first wave of Seabees arrived in August, the heat was intense, often reaching 1200 F. By the time most of the Seabee units had arrived in December, the heat had mitigated, daytime temperatures in the 70's dropping to the 30's at night. The other major problem was sand: it got into everything and was particularly hard on equipment.


    Operation "Desert Storm," the expulsion of Iraqi forces from Kuwait began in early 1991. On 16 January 1991 the Allies initiated a massive air campaign against Iraq. Before it was over, Allied aircraft flew more than 40,000 sorties against Iraqi targets. At this time planning went forward for the 3rd Naval Construction Regiment to move into Kuwait in the wake of advancing Allied forces to open roads and airfields and provide immediate battle-damage repair.


    In January 1991 the Marines began to move north in preparation for the expected ground assault on the Iraqis. In support of this, the Seabees began to concentrate on building and maintaining roads to serve as the main supply routes throughout northern Saudi Arabia.


    After months of constructing millions of square feet of aircraft aprons, camps for tens of thousands of Marines, and hundreds of acres of ammunition and supply points, the Seabees prepared to support the ground assault into Kuwait. NMCB 5 moved half its strength to Al-Kabrit, 30 miles from the Kuwaiti border, and began construction of a Naval Construction Force Logistics Support Base from which the Seabees could provide the First Marine Expeditionary Force the construction support needed during the upcoming assault into Kuwait. The top construction priorities during this period were water, roads, and facilities for the Marine division assembly areas. Water was obtained by exploiting already-existing wells, and the Seabees built galley facilities for the 30,000 Marines of the 1st and 2nd Marine Divisions. A 40,000 man capacity enemy prisoner of war camp was also built.


    The most formidable task facing the Seabees was the road network required by General Schwarzkopf's "End Run" attack strategy. Spanning more than 30 miles of desert from Al-Mishab to Al-Kabrit, the "End Run" strategy ultimately required more than 200 miles of roads west and north of the Kuwaiti border. Because of the need to deceive the Iraqis, much of the construction necessary had to be done at the last minute. Working in the wettest weather seen in Saudi Arabia in years, Seabees completed the necessary construction in approximately two weeks. Thousands of trucks moved million of gallons of water and fuel, and tons of supplies, ammunition and spare parts on this road network to support the two Marine divisions making the assault. By the time the assault was launched, Seabees were maintaining approximately 200 miles of roads near the Kuwaiti border. One of these roads was an east-west corridor from Ras Al Mishab through Al Kabrit, continuing past Al Qaraah for a total distance of almost 100 miles. This six-lane road was traversed daily by more than 500 heavy haulers and thousands of tactical vehicles.


    NMCB 5 and 40 relocated to the north and west. From this area, roads to the border, another well, and a 1,500-foot Remote Piloted Vehicle runway were built. On the day before the ground assault, Seabees dug in the 1st Marine Division command element on the border as the division moved into its attack positions.


    On G Day, 25 February 1991, the Allies launched a massive ground assault against the Iraqis. The next day, an advance party from NMCB 5 and 24 entered Kuwait to prepare positions for the First Marine Expeditionary Force command element, and to repair airfields, maintain roads, and build more enemy prisoner of war camps. As the Seabees labored at these tasks, the smoke from hundred of burning oil wells turned day into dark. On 28 February, the Iraqi, devastated by the Allied attack, accepted a cease fire and the conflict ended. Construction ceased, and the Seabees returned to their units just south of the Kuwaiti border. Thus, ended the largest Seabee military action since the close of the Vietnam War.


    The Gulf War demonstrated the ability of the Naval Construction Force, both active and reserve, to meet the exigencies of a large-scale military operation. Not all of the action, however, was in the Persian Gulf. Approximately 60 percent of the Seabee reserve units called to active duty were sent to other parts of the world to replace active-duty units sent to the Gulf early in the conflict.



  3. #3
    Phantom Blooper
    Guest Free Member
    http://www.history.navy.mil/wars/dstorm/index.html
    Return to Naval Historical Center home page.





    DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY -- NAVAL HISTORICAL CENTER
    805 KIDDER BREESE SE -- WASHINGTON NAVY YARD
    WASHINGTON DC 20374-5060


    Ser OO/lU500179
    15 May 1991
    From: Chief of Naval Operations
    Subj: THE UNITED STATES NAVY IN "DESERT SHIELD" / "DESERT STORM"
    Encl: (l) Summary Report


    1. This summary of the role of the United States Navy in Operations DESERT SHIELD and DESERT STORM was compiled from the reports of operational commanders and supporting commands, and information gathered at headquarters. It provides a ready reference of Navy participation in DESERT SHIELD/STORM with the objective of making accurate, useful information available as quickly as possible.


    2. The significance of the Navy's role in Operations DESERT SHIELD and DESERT STORM is clear. Forward deployed naval forces provided protection for early introduction of land-based ground and air assets, and may well have deterred further aggression by Iraq. Maritime superiority and unchallenged control of the sea enabled the safe and timely delivery of equipment, supplies and spare parts necessary to support the allied campaign. Interdiction of Iraqi seaborne trade, an ongoing operation, cut enemy resupply, dampened their will to fight and significantly impacted Iraq's economic health. More than 90% of material to support the campaign was delivered by sealift, and the majority of medical assets in the early months were provided by Navy. The presence of Middle East Force ships deterred Iraqi mine laying in the southern Persian Gulf. Naval aviation complemented allied air operations, added flexibility to the air campaign and deterred reintroduction of Iraqi aircraft from Iran into the conflict. Tomahawk cruise missiles took out heavily defended targets in Iraq and significantly degraded enemy air defenses.


    3. The most significant contributor to our decisive victory was our motivated, dedicated, well-trained volunteers. Our people performed superbly, and validated the investments made in them over the past decades. Their courage, commitment and professionalism inspired unprecedented and well-deserved support from the American public and national leadership. Their compassion and generosity in the war's aftermath inspired the world. The men and women of the U.S. Armed Forces gave us victory, and America's sailors were a crucial part of that victory. This report documents the contributions of the men and women who wear the uniform of the United States Navy.
    TABLE OF CONTENTS

    EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
    The Role of the Navy
    Lessons Learned

    I. OVERVIEW
    A Short History of the United States Navy in the Persian Gulf
    The Role of the Navy in Joint Operations
    Flexible Response: The Navy-Marine Team in Action

    II. "THE GATHERING STORM"
    The Buildup of U.S. Navy Forces
    The Buildup of Airpower
    The Buildup of Ground Forces
    Navy Medical Buildup and Follow-Through
    Naval Reserve Support

    III. "A COMMON GOAL"
    Joint Operations During DESERT SHIELD/STORM
    The Maritime Interceptlon Campaign

    IV. "BULLETS, BANDAGES AND BEANS"
    Sealift Investments of the 1980s
    Sealift During DESERT SHIELD/STORM
    Maintaining Combat Readiness
    Navy Combat Logistics
    Navy SEABEES--"Can Do" in Action

    V. "THUNDER AND LIGHTNING"
    The Air War
    The War at Sea
    Amphibious Operations
    Support for the Troops: The Ground War
    The Weapons of War
    The Post-War Period

    VI. LESSONS LEARNED AND SUMMARY
    Areas Not Tested
    Old Lessons Revalidated
    The Lessons of DESERT SHIELD/STORM
    Summary

    VII. EPILOGUE





    APPENDICES
    APPENDIX A: CHRONOLOGY
    APPENDIX B: PARTICIPATING NAVAL UNITS
    APPENDIX C: ALLIED PARTICIPATION AND CONTRIBUTIONS
    APPENDIX D: AIRCRAFT SORTIE COUNT
    APPENDIX E: AIRCRAFT READINESS RATES
    APPENDIX F: AIRCRAFT AND PERSONNEL LOSSES
    APPENDIX G: NAVAL GUNFIRE SUPPORT
    APPENDIX H: SURFACE WARFARE
    APPENDIX I: UNMANNED AERIAL VEHICLES
    APPENDIX J: MARITIME INTERCEPTION OPERATIONS
    APPENDIX K: SEALIFT
    APPENDIX L: AIRLIFT.
    APPENDIX M: MISCELLANEOUS PERSONNEL DATA
    APPENDIX N: NAVAL RESERVE
    APPENDIX O: MEDICAL SUPPORT
    APPENDIX P: MEDIA POOLS





    Return to Naval Historical Center home page.

    24 April 2001




  4. #4
    Thanks Blooper. Doesn't mention any combat operations that I could find, in that Navy personell engaged in ground combat with the Iraqis resulting in casualties. Am I missing something? Were the Seebees the only units deployed in boots on the ground other than SEALS or Corpsman?
    Allen


  5. #5
    Hay Allen Banks,
    Which NAVY was your brother-in-law in??? The only Us Navy forces with Boots-on-the-ground within Saudi was the Seabee's. I'm a former Seabee who served with NMCB-24. I owe my life to the Marines who saved our convoy from small arms fire on the morning of Dec. 26, 1990 near the Kibrit AO. If any of you Marines from the 8th Engineers remembers this incident please contact me ASAP. I could use a buddy-statement letter from any of you who was there. Contact EO-3 George Kernaghan at: gekernaghan@yahoo.com , or go to my webpage at: www.desertveteransearch.com , for the details of the convoy on Dec.26,'90. Thanks for saving my A-s.
    Semper Fi
    EO-3 George Kernaghan, NMCB-24 http://www.desertveteransearch.com


  6. #6
    You have to love the Seabees, their priorities were always in line during beach-ops, chow hall up first then everything else fall in place. Being an HE operator the competition was always fun. Banks, it's good to see another Red Patcher.


  7. #7
    Marine Free Member DWG's Avatar
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    Besides, brothers-in-law are ALWAYS full of BS!

    And every one knows that the SeaBees are the only part of the Navy that ain't, you know, funny! (and corpsmen)


  8. #8
    The SeaBees rocked. I got to know a few on Diego Garcia back in 80....they were some good guys.

    Wow, I decided to google Diego Garcia for some pics...found something much worse. I had always heard the island never had indigenous people....thats not true, they lived there since the 1800's.

    Its horrible what the Brits and America did to the native people, (an dogs), on that island. Sometimes we do crap that makes me sick and embarrassed.

    The below is a very long clip, I watched it all but I know most will not.

    http://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=...&ct=image&cd=2

    Sorry, didn't mean to hijack....I got off on tangents as some may know, ha.


  9. #9
    You got that right,lmfao


  10. #10
    Marine Family Free Member
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    This wasn't Desert Storm but I believe that the USS Kearsarge was fired on while in port when 2/8 was on one of their deployments(I wish that I could remember off-hand the exact area.) Anyhow, there was a discussion wether this would mean engagement with hostile forces for combat ribbon considerations to those on board ship. I apologise for the faulty memory.


  11. #11
    Marine Free Member SgtHopperUSMC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phantom Blooper
    http://www.history.navy.mil/faqs/faq67-7.htm



    Seabee History: Operations Desert Shield/Desert Storm




    On 2 August 1990 the armed forces of Iraq began the invasion and subsequent conquest of the Emirate of Kuwait. Under United Nations' auspices, the United States and other member nations responded by deploying military forces to Saudi Arabia. The immediate goal was to forestall further Iraqi aggression; the long-range goal was to compel Iraq to withdraw from Kuwait. The initial allied military undertaking to protect Saudi Arabia was dubbed Operation "Desert Shield."



    Among the U.S. forces deployed to the region was the First Marine Expeditionary Force. Seabees were to provide construction support for this force. On 7 August the Seabees began preparations to deploy four battalions to the region: Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 4, 5, 7, and 40. On 13 August the first Seabees arrived in Saudi Arabia, an element of Amphibious Construction Battalion 1, comprising 210 personnel. These men immediately went to work unloading Marine Corps equipment and supplies from Maritime Pre-positioned Force ships.



    During the period 10-20 August, 100 Seabees of Amphibious Construction Battalion 2 departed Norfolk, Virginia, on amphibious ships bound for the Persian Gulf. While in the gulf these Seabees participated in numerous exercises with the Marines to prepare for an amphibious assault in the region.



    The second wave of Seabees to arrive were personnel from Construction Battalion Units 411 and 415; they erected and maintained Fleet Hospital Five, a 500- bed hospital facility at Al Jubail, Saudi Arabia. Both units had female Officers in Charge, marking a first for the Seabees.



    By 14 September the Air Detachments of the four deploying Seabee battalions had arrived. Each comprised 89 men and could operate for 30 days with out resupply. On 27 September NMCB 40's main body arrived in country from Camp Covington, Guam. By 18 October all the battalion main bodies had reached Southwest Asia. NMCB 5 arrived from its home port at the Naval Construction Battalion Center, Port Hueneme, California; and NMCB 4 redeployed from Camp Moscrip, Puerto Rico. NMCB 7 redeployed from Camp Shields on Okinawa, and, unlike the other three battalions, was sent to Bahrain. In December NMCB 24, a reserve unit called to active duty, relieved NMCB 4. That same month, NMCB 5 and 40 were joined by Details 15 and 16 of NMCB 1 which was deployed at Rota, Spain. The 3rd Naval Construction Regiment, a reserve regiment, was mobilized to provide command and control over the deployed battalions. By early February 1991, 2,800 Seabees and 1,375 pieces of equipments had been deployed to the region in support of Operation "Desert Shield."



    Upon their arrival in Saudi Arabia, the Seabees built critically needed facilities at the four airfields where the Marine Air Combat Element had deployed. This entailed construction of parking aprons, as well as base camps to house the Marines pouring into the area. Next, the Seabees built ammunition supply points for the large amounts of ordnance being transported to the region. Once these needs were met, the Seabees shifted emphasis to improving living conditions in the Marine camps.



    Base camps were built for the 3rd Marine Air Wing, Marine Air Groups 11, 13, 16 and 26, and the 1st and 2nd Marine Division. In Bahrain, NMCB 7 supported the Army and Air Force, as well as the Marines. The battalion built strongback tents, an aviation storage facility, a munitions transfer road, and a 60,000 square foot aircraft parking apron. In December, NMCB 74 relieved NMCB 7 in Bahrain, and the latter battalion moved 200 miles north to Ras Al Mishab in Saudi Arabia.



    Among major projects completed during Operation "Desert Shield" were a headquarters complex for the First Marine Expeditionary Force and a 15,000 man camp for the Second Marine Expeditionary Force. The latter project was the largest wartime multi-battalion Seabee project since the Vietnam War. NMCB 1, 4, 5 (project lead), 7, 24, 40 and 74 worked on the project. Construction began in late November. The camp comprised six modules, each capable of housing 2,500 men. Each module contained berthing, office space, showers, toilet facilities, a galley, roads, and parking areas. The completed camp complex was dubbed "Wally World."



    Completing these projects required the Seabees to work seven days a week, two twelve hour shifts a day. The only days off during the whole period of Seabee involvement in the Gulf were Thanksgiving and Christmas. The Gulf environment provided an added challenge for the Seabees. When the first wave of Seabees arrived in August, the heat was intense, often reaching 1200 F. By the time most of the Seabee units had arrived in December, the heat had mitigated, daytime temperatures in the 70's dropping to the 30's at night. The other major problem was sand: it got into everything and was particularly hard on equipment.



    Operation "Desert Storm," the expulsion of Iraqi forces from Kuwait began in early 1991. On 16 January 1991 the Allies initiated a massive air campaign against Iraq. Before it was over, Allied aircraft flew more than 40,000 sorties against Iraqi targets. At this time planning went forward for the 3rd Naval Construction Regiment to move into Kuwait in the wake of advancing Allied forces to open roads and airfields and provide immediate battle-damage repair.



    In January 1991 the Marines began to move north in preparation for the expected ground assault on the Iraqis. In support of this, the Seabees began to concentrate on building and maintaining roads to serve as the main supply routes throughout northern Saudi Arabia.



    After months of constructing millions of square feet of aircraft aprons, camps for tens of thousands of Marines, and hundreds of acres of ammunition and supply points, the Seabees prepared to support the ground assault into Kuwait. NMCB 5 moved half its strength to Al-Kabrit, 30 miles from the Kuwaiti border, and began construction of a Naval Construction Force Logistics Support Base from which the Seabees could provide the First Marine Expeditionary Force the construction support needed during the upcoming assault into Kuwait. The top construction priorities during this period were water, roads, and facilities for the Marine division assembly areas. Water was obtained by exploiting already-existing wells, and the Seabees built galley facilities for the 30,000 Marines of the 1st and 2nd Marine Divisions. A 40,000 man capacity enemy prisoner of war camp was also built.



    The most formidable task facing the Seabees was the road network required by General Schwarzkopf's "End Run" attack strategy. Spanning more than 30 miles of desert from Al-Mishab to Al-Kabrit, the "End Run" strategy ultimately required more than 200 miles of roads west and north of the Kuwaiti border. Because of the need to deceive the Iraqis, much of the construction necessary had to be done at the last minute. Working in the wettest weather seen in Saudi Arabia in years, Seabees completed the necessary construction in approximately two weeks. Thousands of trucks moved million of gallons of water and fuel, and tons of supplies, ammunition and spare parts on this road network to support the two Marine divisions making the assault. By the time the assault was launched, Seabees were maintaining approximately 200 miles of roads near the Kuwaiti border. One of these roads was an east-west corridor from Ras Al Mishab through Al Kabrit, continuing past Al Qaraah for a total distance of almost 100 miles. This six-lane road was traversed daily by more than 500 heavy haulers and thousands of tactical vehicles.



    NMCB 5 and 40 relocated to the north and west. From this area, roads to the border, another well, and a 1,500-foot Remote Piloted Vehicle runway were built. On the day before the ground assault, Seabees dug in the 1st Marine Division command element on the border as the division moved into its attack positions.



    On G Day, 25 February 1991, the Allies launched a massive ground assault against the Iraqis. The next day, an advance party from NMCB 5 and 24 entered Kuwait to prepare positions for the First Marine Expeditionary Force command element, and to repair airfields, maintain roads, and build more enemy prisoner of war camps. As the Seabees labored at these tasks, the smoke from hundred of burning oil wells turned day into dark. On 28 February, the Iraqi, devastated by the Allied attack, accepted a cease fire and the conflict ended. Construction ceased, and the Seabees returned to their units just south of the Kuwaiti border. Thus, ended the largest Seabee military action since the close of the Vietnam War.



    The Gulf War demonstrated the ability of the Naval Construction Force, both active and reserve, to meet the exigencies of a large-scale military operation. Not all of the action, however, was in the Persian Gulf. Approximately 60 percent of the Seabee reserve units called to active duty were sent to other parts of the world to replace active-duty units sent to the Gulf early in the conflict.
    Never saw a Seabee build a road for us. We did our own plus built the largest ASP in history twice. I did envy the chowhall they built well south of us. It had air conditioning.( 8th ESB C C0. 2nd FSSG ) Engineers Up!!



  12. #12

    New changes to Desert Veteran Search webpage

    Hello Marines.

    For those who may be interested ... I've had some recent changes made to my webpage (www.desertveteransearch.com) with the addition of four "Buddy Statement Letters". I have received a few other statement letters from both Marine and Navy personnel who were involved, and had boots-on-the-ground, however the four letters I've selected for the page are atop the chain of command.
    At the present time I am still searching for anyone who was near the Kibrit encampment and has first hand knowledge of the military convoy I was with being hit by small arms fire. I would especially like to hear from the Marines' Corpsman that treated my injuries in the field. I am also searching for any personnel who was part of the night convoy of Dec. 26, 1990.
    Again, I want to send my "Thanks" to all who saved my life, and took care of me. If anyone can be of assistance in helping to locate any of these Marines, etc., all my contact information can be found on the Desert Veteran Search website.

    Semper Fi

    EO-3 Kernaghan
    Seabee


  13. #13
    Marine Free Member SgtHopperUSMC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SgtHopperUSMC View Post
    Never saw a Seabee build a road for us. We did our own plus built the largest ASP in history twice. I did envy the chowhall they built well south of us. It had air conditioning.( 8th ESB C C0. 2nd FSSG ) Engineers Up!!
    They have a great history and did a great job. Thanks


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