Dallas recruiter mows down her competition
8th Marine Corps District
Story by: Sgt. Damian McGee

MARINE CORPS RECRUITING STATION DALLAS(Feb. 8, 2006) -- Coming out with her proverbial "guns blazing," Sgt. Jillian Linnet shot down all her competition in the recent Texas Shootout offensive. She not only bested her competition at Recruiting Station Dallas, but also walked away as the top recruiter in all of 8th Marine Corps District as well.

Linnet, who’s only been on production with Recruiting Substation Mesquite (Texas) for nine months, enlisted seven high school graduates between October 1 and December 31, 2005, four of whom went directly to boot camp the same month they enlisted.

As the District winner, Linnet was awarded the opportunity to attend an awards banquet hosted by Marine Corps Recruiting Command in Orlando, Fla. As part of the ceremony, Major Gen. Walter E. Gaskin, commanding general, Marine Corps Recruiting Command, honored 36 Marines for their accomplishments. As the top performer for 8th Marine Corps District, Linnet received a Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal.

Despite being on production less than a year, Linnet credits her success to quickly learning what it takes to be a successful recruiter.

“I don’t look at number of contracts to measure my success,” Linnet said. “Instead I look at a Marine’s ability to be a team player. A Marine can be on zero (contracts) and be successful as long as they know they must write six the next month.”

Linnet, who started her military career more than six years ago, never planned on being a recruiter. After being selected for the duty, she decided there was only one approach to her next three years in the Marine Corps.

“I have to be successful,” Linnet said. “I would have preferred being a drill instructor, but this is where the Marine Corps needed me. No matter where the Marine Corps sends me I’m going to do everything in my power to work hard and be successful.”

While some look at success as a way to make a name for them, or for accolades, the Corning, Calif. native credits her desire for success to everyone who answers to the Linnet name.

“Everywhere we go as Marines we wear our names displayed on our chests,” Linnet explained. “However, this is not only my name, but the name of my family. As long as I wear this uniform and my name is displayed for the world to see I never want to do anything to disappoint my family or our name.”

Linnet feels the next group of people, after her family, whom she owes something to would be those men and women she sends to boot camp to earn the title Marine.

“I make sure I’m completely honest with the people I enlist,” Linnet said. “The last thing any recruiter wants is to return to the fleet, see a Marine we enlisted, and have them tell us we lied to them. Instead, I want a junior Marine to be able to look me in the eye and say that because he took some time to speak with me he is where he is now. I want him to feel that I helped build the solid foundation he know stands on.”

Ellie