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  1. #1

    Cool For The Return of America's Missing Servicemen World War II - Korea - Cold War - Viet

    National Alliance of Families
    For The Return of America's Missing Servicemen
    World War II - Korea - Cold War - Vietnam - Gulf War
    Dolores Alfond - 425-881-1499
    Lynn O'Shea --- 718-846-4350
    Web Site http://www.nationalalliance.org
    email -- lynn@nationalalliance.org

    October 19, 2002 Bts N Pieces

    Longer Than Some, Not As Long As Others - October 19, 2002 marks Capt.
    Speicher's 4,295th day in captivity.
    ###############

    Status Change for Capt. Speicher - the first POW of the 1991 Gulf War, once
    classified Killed in Action, Body Not Recovered, has once again been
    reclassified this time from Missing In Action to Missing/Captured.
    According to an Associated Press article, dated October 11th - "The U.S.
    Navy on Friday declared Gulf War pilot Michael Scott Speicher was captured
    by Iraq, saying there's no evidence the officer is dead. Two senators
    suggested there is new, classified evidence indicating Speicher is alive
    inside Iraq."

    "... Speicher originally was declared dead after his F/A-18 was shot down
    the opening night of the Gulf War in 1991. But the military changed his
    status to missing in action a decade later, given the absence of evidence he
    was killed in the crash. Iraq claims Speicher was killed, but has not
    turned over any remains."

    "Navy Secretary Gordon England on Friday changed Speicher's official status
    to missing/captured. "I have no evidence to conclude that Captain Speicher
    is dead," England wrote. "While the information available to me now does
    not prove definitively that Captain Speicher is alive and in Iraqi custody,
    I am personally convinced the Iraqis seized him sometime after his plane
    went down. Further, it is my firm belief that the government of Iraq knows
    what happened to Captain Speicher."

    "A spokeswoman for Joanne Harris, Speicher's wife, said the officer's family
    was pleased with the change. "We think it is about time. We asked for this
    change more than a year ago," said Cindy Laquidara, a Jacksonville attorney
    who speaks for Harris. "When you leave somebody behind, the passage of time
    does not make a difference," she said. "It should not be up to the
    serviceman to prove he is alive."

    "Sen. Pat Roberts, R-Kan., said in a statement Friday he believes Speicher
    is indeed alive. Roberts came to that conclusion last month after getting a
    series of classified briefings on the case, said spokeswoman Sarah Ross.
    "A lot of that is based on intelligence information and a general hunch,"
    Ross said."

    "Sen. Bill Nelson, D-Fla., said an Iraqi defector told officials that 11
    years ago he drove a wounded American pilot to a hospital. "He was a
    credible witness," said Nelson, who said the man had given information on
    other topics that was correct. He had also passed a polygraph exam, Nelson
    said."

    "Roberts, Nelson and other members of Congress had pressed the Pentagon to
    declare Speicher a prisoner of war. England wrote that the captured
    designation means that "if alive, he's a prisoner of war."

    "This change in status adds credibility and urgency to efforts to secure
    Capt. Scott Speicher's release," Roberts said. "It sends a symbolic message
    to the Iraqis, to other adversaries and most important to the men and women
    of the armed forces that we will accept nothing less than full disclosure of
    circumstances surrounding the missing and captured."

    "England deliberately waited to approve the change until after Congress had
    given Bush the authority he sought to take military action in Iraq,
    according to a defense official who spoke on condition of anonymity.
    Though not mentioning Speicher by name, Bush has referred in several recent
    speeches to a U.S. pilot still missing in Iraq....."
    ####################

    We Take Exception - Secretary England's statement "if alive, he's a prisoner
    of war," is not totally correct. If Speicher died in Iraqi custody, he is
    still a Prisoner of War, a POW who died in captivity. Dying in enemy hand
    does not and should not change a POWs status.
    ####################

    Optimism vs Pessimism - A Press Release issued by Senator Pat Roberts (R-KAN
    ), on October 11th stated "Roberts said he now believes Captain Speicher may
    be alive and held captive by Iraq." The Associated Press reported "Roberts
    came to that conclusion last month after getting a series of classified
    briefings on the case, said spokeswoman Sarah Ross. "A lot of that is
    based on intelligence information and a general hunch," Ross said."

    Of the Iraqi defector who identified Capt. Speicher as the American pilot he
    drove to a hospital Senator Bill Nelson (D-FL), is quoted by the AP as
    saying ""He was a credible witness..." AP also reported Nelson as saying
    "the man had given information on other topics that was correct. He had also
    passed a polygraph exam."

    Secretary of Navy Gordon England stated: "I have no evidence to conclude
    that Captain Speicher is dead." He went on to say: "While the information
    available to me now does not prove definitively that Captain Speicher is
    alive and in Iraqi custody, I am personally convinced the Iraqis seized him
    sometime after his plane went down. Further, it is my firm belief that the
    government of Iraq knows what happened to Captain Speicher."

    The Secretary England's statement "I am personally convinced the Iraqis
    seized him sometime after his plane went down," is extremely important. We
    assume that Secretary England based this statement on his review of the
    intelligence reports. Using that assumption, it now puts Scott Speicher
    was ALIVE in Iraqi hands.

    What we don't know is if he is alive today. However, two United States
    Senators, after reviewing the intelligence reports believe Speicher may very
    well be alive, today.

    The prevailing attitude of DPMO is to dismissal intelligence reports and
    witness statements, indicating Speicher is alive. This includes the very
    source Senator Nelson stated: "was a credible witness..."

    Our question - Are Senators Nelson and Roberts along with Secretary England
    viewing the same intelligence as DPMO? If they are, how can the opinions
    of Senators Nelson and Roberts, along with Secretary England be at such odds
    with DPMO. We guess the answer is simple.... It's business as ususal at
    DPMO.


    continued..........

    IN LOVING MEMORY OF MY LATE HUSBAND, SSgt Roger A. Alfano, USMC
    ONE PROUD MARINE
    1961-1977
    Vietnam 1968/69
    Once a Marine...Always a Marine

    https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1204617174

  2. #2
    Missing/Captured vs. POW - the term Prisoner of War or POW is no longer
    valid. Well....

    Right Church Wrong Pew - We're sure many of our readers are familiar with
    this phrase "Right church wrong pew." For those who aren't, it simply means
    that your in the right location but just off a bit. During the year 2000,
    we expressed our concern that the status designation Prisoner of War would
    disappear. Based on information available to us, we believe the POW status
    would be replaced by the term Isolated Personnel or Isolated Persons.

    On Feb. 12, 2000, the following appeared in Bits N Pieces - "A Look Into The
    Future - Bulletin... In OOTW, we have 3 IP's... Translation: In "Operations
    Other Than War" we have three "Isolated Persons." That's the new
    terminology. Wars are longer wars and captured Americans are no longer POWs.
    They are Isolated Personnel. This terminology comes from the 1999
    Department of Defense Personnel Recovery Conference Report dated October 26
    - 28, 1999. A scan of the body of this report reveals the phrase
    "Prisoner of War" is used only once, as is the acronym POW. The phrase
    "Isolated Personnel" appears, by our count, 13 times."

    We continued to express our concern over the expected discontinuation of the
    POW status. Our concern elicited a response from DPMO and in our October
    21st edition of Bits we reported; "On October 5th, 2000, the National
    Alliance of Families received a letter from DPMO General Counsel James F.
    Gravelle. The letter states: "Let me assure you prisoner of war is not
    being replaced by isolated personnel. There is no initiative to do so and,
    basically, prisoner of war and isolated personnel are not interchangeable.
    Prisoner of war is a legal status of military personnel captured during an
    international armed conflict between two countries, and entitles those
    captured to humanitarian treatment under the Geneva Conventions. You may
    recall this status was claimed for our three soldiers who were captured in
    the Kosovo conflict in 1999. Claiming isolated personnel status for our
    captured personnel would be meaningless."

    Mr. Gravelle was correct. Prisoner of War was not replaced by isolated
    personnel. However, he didn't tell us the plan was to eliminate the
    Prisoner of War status in favor with a category of Missing titled
    Missing/Captured. Nor, did he tell us, that at the time the letter was
    written, the wheels were already in motion to replace the POW status, but
    not with isolated personnel.

    On December 18, 2002, almost two months after Mr. Gravelle's letter, the
    Dept. of Defense issued Instruction Number 1300.18. Its subject: "Military
    Personnel Casualty Matters, Policies, and Procedures defines the new
    Casualty categories, in Section E2.1.1.6. It reads: "Casualty Category.
    A term used to specifically classify a casualty for reporting purposes based
    upon the casualty type and the casualty status. Casualty categories
    include killed in action (KIA), died of wounds received in action (DWRIA),
    beleaguered, besieged, captured, detained, interned, missing, in action (MIA
    ), and wounded in action (WIA)."

    The following sections defines the new categories for those captured or
    missing.

    E2.1.1.24. Missing. A casualty status applicable to a person who is not
    at his or her duty location due to apparent involuntary reasons and whose
    location may or may not be known. Chapter 10 of 37 U.S.C. (reference (f))
    provides statutory guidance concerning missing members of the Military
    Services. Excluded are personnel who are in an AWOL, deserter, or dropped-
    from-rolls status. A person declared missing is further categorized as
    follows:

    E2.1.1.24.1. Beleaguered. The casualty is a member of an organized
    element that has been surrounded by a hostile force to prevent escape of its
    members.

    E2.1.1.24.2. Besieged. The casualty is a member of an organized element
    that has been surrounded by a hostile force compelling it to surrender.

    E2.1.1.24.3. Captured. The casualty has been seized as the result of
    action of an unfriendly military or paramilitary force in a foreign country.


    E2.1.1.24.4. Detained. The casualty is prevented from proceeding or is
    restrained in custody for alleged violation of international law or other
    reason claimed by the government or group under which the person is being
    held.

    E2.1.1.24.5. Interned. The casualty definitely known to have been taken
    into custody of a nonbelligerent
    foreign power as the result of and for reasons arising out of any armed
    conflict in which the Armed Forces of the United States are engaged.

    E2.1.1.24.6. Missing. The casualty is not present at his or her duty
    location due to apparent involuntary reasons and whose location is unknown.

    E2.1.1.24.7. Missing in Action (MIA). The casualty is a hostile casualty,
    other than the victim of a terrorist activity, who is not present at his or
    her duty location due to apparent involuntary reasons and whose location is
    unknown.

    A review of the entire directive finds that the phrase Prisoner or War or
    the acronym POW is never used.

    The fact that the terminology Prisoner of War is no longer used was
    confirmed by Secretary of the Navy Gordon R. England. In his 11 October
    2002 memo announcing the change in status of Capt. Michael Scott Speicher
    from Missing In Action to Missing/Captured, Secretary England stated:
    "Although the controlling missing persons statute and directives do not use
    the term "Prisoner of War," the fact supporting a change in Captain
    Speicher's category from Missing in Action to Missing/Captured would also
    support the conclusion that, if alive, he is a Prisoner of War."

    If it walks like a duck and quacks like a duck, call it a duck. If an
    American service member is captured by hostile forces he or she is a
    Prisoner of War. Why not designate them as such?

    Here is our theory. Back in 1999 and early 2000, we reported that DPMO was
    moving toward a reactive recovery effort for past conflicts, by the year
    2004. That means they will only investigate when new information is
    received, taking the recovery effort from active to reactive based on new
    information. We stated that JTF-FA, as we know it, would cease to exist.
    That was proven correct with the announcement, this past summer of a merger
    of CIL-HI and JTF-FA. We also stated that there was a plan to eliminate the
    status of Prisoner of War. Again, we were proven correct.

    DPMO is gearing up for its role in future conflicts. Among their goals is
    to never again be caught up in a 30, 40 or 50 year recovery operation. In
    order to achieve that goal you can't leave POWs behind. To insure that
    does not happen, you simply eliminate POWs.

    The phrase Prisoner of War says two thing. First it says Prisoner - living
    breathing human being. Second it says held by the enemy. Prisoner of War
    is a phrase that inflames. America does not leave its servicemen, its
    Prisoners behind. We don't leave POWs behind. At least that is what
    they'd like us to believe. We know differently.

    The phrase Missing/Captured also says two thing. First it says Missing -
    This dehumanizes the status. Missing can be anything from your car keys to
    a person. Even in law enforcement when a person disappears they become a
    Missing Person not Missing/Beleaguered or Missing/Besieged or even
    Missing/Captured. Second, Missing/Capture gives the implication that your
    not really sure - maybe missing maybe captured and that is the key. In
    future conflicts, no one gets left behind because not one is Prisoner. They
    are just Missing with a slash....

    The DPMO Strategic Plan we wrote about in 1999 and 2000, the plan we were
    assured was dead, is alive and well. We been proven correct on too many
    occasions to doubt that.

    We may not always be in the right pew, but we've always been in the right
    church.

    Nothing has changed at DPMO, and those who think things have need to take a
    good hard look before it's too late.

    continued..........

    IN LOVING MEMORY OF MY LATE HUSBAND, SSgt Roger A. Alfano, USMC
    ONE PROUD MARINE
    1961-1977
    Vietnam 1968/69
    Once a Marine...Always a Marine

    https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1204617174

  3. #3
    Speicher Bill Passes The House - From the Associated Press, Oct. 15th -
    "Congress is promising refugee status to any Iraqi who delivers to the
    United States a living American prisoner of war from the Persian Gulf War
    or any future conflict with the Iraqi government. The measure, approved by
    the House Tuesday and sent to the president for his signature, expands a law
    enacted in 2000 that gives asylum to citizens of Southeast Asian nations,
    China, Russia or North Korea who bring back Americans held prisoner from the
    Korean or Vietnam War...."

    "The legislation, passed by voice vote, also applies to nationals of other
    Middle East countries who rescue an American POW, but does not extend to
    those deemed to be criminals, terrorists or threats to U.S. security.
    The Senate approved the bill, sponsored by Sen. Ben Nighthorse Campbell, R-
    Colo., last July."
    ###################

    Our Thanks - to Senator Ben Nighthorse Campbell, for introducing this
    legislation, to his staff for their dedication to it's passage and to our
    readership who worked so hard gathering co-sponsors, and pushing this
    legislation through the House committees.

    You are all to be congratulated for a job extraordinarily well done.
    ####################

    Japanese Abductees - When we reported, in the Sept. 27th edition of Bits,
    on the admission by North Korea that they had kidnaped Japanese citizens
    during the 1970's we never thought the story would take on an added twist.
    As it turns out Hitomi Soga, who was kidnaped in August of 1978, along with
    her mother, is married to American Servicemen Charles Robert Jenkins. Ms.
    Soga was give the Korean name and was forced to teach Japanese language and
    customs to North Korean spies. Jenkins who taught English is listed by the
    military as having deserted in January of 1965.

    As we have previously reported an intelligence report from 1962 indicated a
    North Korean plan to kidnap American Servicemen and take them into North
    Korea. We have long questioned the status of Jenkins, Parrish, Abshire and
    Dresnok the other American "defectors." Until each man can be questioned,
    on neutral ground, we must give the benefit of the doubt to the serviceman.

    This week Ms. Soga was allowed to visit her family in Japan. Neither her
    husband or their two daughters, reported by Japanese media as Mika (born on
    Jun. 1, 1983) and Belinda (born on Jul. 23, 1985), accompanied her and Ms.
    Soga must return to North Korea. There are conflicting reports as to
    whether Mr. Jenkins was offered to opportunity to fly to Japan and refused.
    However, we do know that none of the children of those kidnaped were
    allowed to accompany their parents.

    In the October 19th edition of the New York Times, James Brooke's reports:
    "Tokyo, Oct. 18 - It was the unlikeliest of marriages. Charles Robert
    Jenkins, a former United States Army sergeant listed by the Pentagon as a
    defector to North Korea, was teaching English in Pyongyang. "

    "Hitomi Soga, a prisoner of the North Koreans, became his student, her
    family says. nd, brought together by such flimsy threads of fate, she and Mr
    . Jenkins fell in love. Their romance began more than 20 years ago, when Ms.
    Soga, a Japanese nursing student, was one of several Japanese kidnaped by
    the North, her sister said at a televised news conference here."

    "The simple request to learn English ended in a wedding on Aug. 8, 1980,
    said the sister. Hitomi Soga, now 43, returned to Japan this week for a
    reunion with her family and friends. Mr. Jenkins told a Japanese diplomat
    on Tuesday that, fearing arrest, he had declined an offer to fly to Japan."

    "The last confirmed sighting of Sergeant Jenkins, now 62, was on a
    midwinter night in 1965, according to an Army report released in 1996.
    Patrolling the Korean demilitarized zone at 2:30 a.m. on Jan. 5 of that year
    , the 25-year-old North Carolina native signaled his three-man squad to
    wait."

    "He walked ahead, ostensibly to check out something suspicious. Three
    weeks later, the North Korean state radio announced that this well-regarded
    Army veteran, a slender small-town man nicknamed Super, had defected to a
    better life in Communist North Korea."

    "But Mr. Jenkins's family in the United States has never accepted the
    assertion that he defected. "We have never received a letter from him," Pat
    Harrell, a younger sister, said by telephone from North Carolina. Excited
    to hear concrete details of her brother, she said, "We have never received
    a photograph of him."

    "Mr. Jenkins is one of about a dozen former American soldiers thought to be
    living in North Korea, according to Dolores A. Alfond, chairwoman of the
    National Alliance of Families for the Return of America's Missing Servicemen
    ."

    "In 1996 a Pentagon study classified four of them, including Mr. Jenkins, as
    deserters and the rest as soldiers captured during the Korean War, now half
    a century ago."

    "For North Korea - officially the Democratic People's Republic of Korea -
    the deserters are a sorely needed bargaining chip in negotiations with the
    Bush administration, particularly after this week's revelations about the
    country's nuclear weapons program."

    "The issue of Americans who defected to our side from U.S. forces units
    stationed in South Korea after the war may be smoothly settled depending on
    the termination of the hostile relationship between the D.P.R.K. and the U.
    S.," a North Korean Army spokesman told the state news agency on Saturday."

    "North Korea has never denied the presence of Americans on its soil, but it
    has always maintained that they were defectors.

    "American prisoner of war groups say successive American administrations
    have placed a low priority on negotiating the return of Americans held by
    North Korea or even access by their families."

    "On Tuesday, Richard A. Boucher, the State Department spokesman, said of Mr.
    Jenkins, "The United States has sought to talk to this person and other
    Americans who are known to be in North Korea, but largely about whether they
    had heard or knew of any others who might have been there."

    "Little is known about the American, other than what Ms. Soga's family has
    said: that he teaches English and has two daughters, aged 17 and 19, who
    study at the Pyongyang University of Foreign Studies."

    "Tuesday morning a Japanese diplomat, Akitaka Saiki, met Mr. Jenkins on the
    second floor of the terminal of Pyongyang International Airport. He was
    sitting there quietly with his daughters, each wearing a Kim Jong Il lapel
    pin. "He seemed surprised to meet me," Mr. Saiki said of his encounter
    Tuesday with Mr. Jenkins. "He told he had been with the U.S. Army."

    "The daughters didn't seem to speak English well," Mr. Saiki said, "so I
    asked a Korean-speaking colleague if they wanted to come to Japan. The girls
    said they wanted to visit Japan, where Hitomi was born. But Mr. Jenkins
    said, `It might be difficult for me to visit Japan, until my situation
    improves.' "

    "The Army has long maintained that Mr. Jenkins deserted his post, citing a
    farewell letter written to his family and radio broadcasts he had made in
    the late 1960's. For decades the Jenkins family and their supporters have
    maintained that the letter is a fake and that he and other American
    soldiers were kidnaped by North Korean soldiers to win propaganda points in
    the cold war and to gain native English speakers for their spy schools."

    "I don't believe this bit about him being a deserter," Mrs. Harrell said,
    citing a "happy" home visit by Mr. Jenkins at Christmas of 1964. "I don't
    believe he walked over there freely." Her husband, Lee, added: "I think
    they were all abducted like these Japanese women. They were used to teach
    their men for undercover work."

    "In North Carolina, Mrs. Harrell attributed her brother's nearly four
    decades of total silence to North Korea's
    government. Five years ago she met with North Korean diplomats at the
    United Nations and asked permission to see her brother. "They were cordial
    , but they never gave me any indication that would ever happen," she said.
    "I gave them letters for my brother. But I am sure they got destroyed as
    soon as they were handed over."

    "In her letter, Mrs. Harrell, a devout Christian who had not seen her
    brother since she was 15, wrote: "There's not a day that goes by that we
    don't think about you and pray for you. We'll never stop praying for you."

    Defector or Abductee - many questions need to be answered before a
    determination can be made regarding the status of Charles Jenkins. Did
    Jenkins walk across the DMZ to North Korea or was he kidnaped, like his
    future wife and the other Japanese citizens. Was Jenkins and the other
    American's needed for the North Korean spy school, as Ms. Soga and the
    Japanese nationals were?

    Why is DPMO and the Pentagon so dismissive of the possibility that Jenkins
    and perhaps the others are victims of a kidnap and not deserters?

    North Korea obviously has a "Charm School" in operation for many years,
    snatching foreign Nationals to be used to school North Korean spies, in the
    language and mannerisms of their enemies.

    continued..........

    IN LOVING MEMORY OF MY LATE HUSBAND, SSgt Roger A. Alfano, USMC
    ONE PROUD MARINE
    1961-1977
    Vietnam 1968/69
    Once a Marine...Always a Marine

    https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1204617174

  4. #4
    Recommended Reading - "The Charm School" by Nelson DeMille, listed as
    fiction, perhaps this book is close to fact then anyone would like us to
    believe.
    #############

    North Korea Threatens Remains Recovery Operations - from the Associated
    Press, Oct. 13th, by Paul Shin "SEOUL, South Korea (AP) - North Korea warned
    Sunday the United States' "hostile policy" toward the communist country was
    hampering efforts to recover the remains of U.S. soldiers missing from the
    1950-53 Korean War...."

    "...The U.S. Administration's hostile policy toward (North Korea) has
    touched off bitter anti-U.S. sentiment among the Korean people, which
    seriously impedes the exhumation of remains of the war dead, including the
    investigation and confirmation of the burial places," the North's military
    said in a statement, which was carried by the official Korean Central News
    Agency."

    "The statement, by an unidentified military spokesman, followed the
    communist country's harsh criticism of a recent visit by a U.S. special
    envoy. In Pyongyang, the North's capital, U.S. Assistant Secretary of State
    James
    Kelly conveyed Washington's "serious concerns" about the North's weapons
    program. The visit marked Washington's first security talks with North Korea
    since U.S. President George W. Bush took office in early 2001."


    "North Korea accused Kelly of making "arrogant and threatening" remarks in
    discussing security issues in Pyongyang and vowed not to bow to any U.S.
    pressure..."

    "During talks with North Korea in Bangkok, Thailand earlier this month, the
    United States asked Pyongyang to help investigate reports of U.S.
    servicemen missing from the Korean War who may be living or held captive
    within its borders. The U.S. government has never conclusively found that
    there are any Americans from the Korean War alive in North Korea, although a
    Pentagon analyst wrote in a 1996 internal report that there were possibly
    10 to 15 prisoners of war."

    "Washington also pressed for access to four U.S. servicemen who defected to
    North Korea from South Korea in the 1960s. The North Korean statement said
    the issue of the four defectors "may be smoothly settled depending on the
    termination of the hostile relationship" between the two countries."

    Another take on the situation comes from BBC Monitoring of KCNA News Agnecy
    in Pyongyang, on Oct.13th, "....At the recent talks on remains of US war
    dead in Thailand we, therefore, presented reasonable and realistic proposals
    including the question of establishing and operating a national
    organization for investigation to the US side. The US administration's
    hostile policy towards the DPRK has touched off bitter anti-US sentiment
    among the Korean people, which seriously impedes the exhumation of remains
    of the war dead, including the investigation and confirmation of the burial
    places."

    "There are no American "war survivors", the issue raised by the US side
    since all the US POWs [prisoners of war] were already repatriated in
    accordance with the agreement between the two sides right after the Korean
    War. And the issue of Americans who defected to our side from US forces
    units stationed in South Korea after the war may be smoothly settled
    depending on the termination of the hostile relationship between the DPRK
    and the US as it is not contrary to the international law on political
    exiles and the right to protect them. If the US side is really interested in
    the exhumation of remains of the war dead, it should sincerely do what it
    has to do.
    ##############

    The Lies - For years, the North Koreans denied they had kidnaped Japanese
    citizens. For years they denied they were involved in developing an Nuclear
    Weapons Program. Does anyone really think they are not capable of lying
    about holding American Prisoners of War or the status of men listed as
    deserters? Or do we believe that the North Koreans would lie about
    everything but POWs and deserters?

    Fool me once, shame on you.... fool me twice, shame on me.... or in this
    case shame on DPMO, the Pentagon, and the State Department experts who
    continually negotiate away the store, while either getting nothing in return
    or being lied to.
    ################

    Just To Let You Know We Haven't Forgotten....

    Why Does Johnie Webb Still Have A Job!


    Sempers,

    Roger

    IN LOVING MEMORY OF MY LATE HUSBAND, SSgt Roger A. Alfano, USMC
    ONE PROUD MARINE
    1961-1977
    Vietnam 1968/69
    Once a Marine...Always a Marine

    https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1204617174

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