To The Draft Dodger
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  1. #1
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    To The Draft Dodger

    by: ecarson74

    They sent me places far from home
    Across the world, and all alone

    They drained my heart of all but blood
    And made me live in sweat and mud

    This is how I have to live
    It's part of what I've pledged to give

    So throw your parties, drink your beer
    While teen-aged kids are dying here

    Paint protest signs and have your fun
    And shout that you won't man a gun

    There is nothing that you do
    That makes me care to die for you

    But there's one thing that you don't know
    That's where I think you ought to go

    They sent me here, and it's too late
    But I can sure express my hate

    I'll hate you 'til the day I die
    You made me hear my buddy cry

    I heard him scream, I saw blood shed
    Then heard a corpsman say "he's dead"

    Too large a price for him to pay
    To let you live another day

    He had the guts to fight and die
    Preserving rights that you live by


  2. #2
    Thank You Lisa..your post is great


  3. #3

    Re: To The Draft Dodger

    Originally posted by lakers
    by: ecarson74

    They sent me places far from home
    Across the world, and all alone

    They drained my heart of all but blood
    And made me live in sweat and mud

    This is how I have to live
    It's part of what I've pledged to give

    So throw your parties, drink your beer
    While teen-aged kids are dying here

    Paint protest signs and have your fun
    And shout that you won't man a gun

    There is nothing that you do
    That makes me care to die for you

    But there's one thing that you don't know
    That's where I think you ought to go

    They sent me here, and it's too late
    But I can sure express my hate

    I'll hate you 'til the day I die
    You made me hear my buddy cry

    I heard him scream, I saw blood shed
    Then heard a corpsman say "he's dead"

    Too large a price for him to pay
    To let you live another day

    He had the guts to fight and die
    Preserving rights that you live by
    In Honor of Patriots/Poolees they ar the people that will insure OUR FREEDOMS..they are willing to do the tasks at hand.


  4. #4

    DRAFT DODGERS

    DRAFT DODGERS ARE LIKE FLIES..............
    THEY EAT SH!T AND BOTHER PEOPLE !!!!

    AS OF 0555 OCT 5, 02 THIS THREAD HAS HAD 39 VIEWS AND 3 REPLIES........DOES THAT MEAN THAT SO FAR APPROXIMATELY 90% OF THE PEOPLE THAT HAVE READ IT ARE POTENTIAL DRAFT DODGERS OR DOES THAT MEAN THEY DON'T GIVE A FLYIN FVCK??
    NICE POST LADY !!



  5. #5
    Registered User Free Member Barndog's Avatar
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    It could mean, basically that they have nothing to either add, or little or nothing to say about it, becuase the draft was stopped so long ago.

    I myself didn't need a draft.

    I went on my own accord, not because I had to, because I WANTED to, on my own Honor - and that Honor of my Father and Uncles before me.

    I think those are some of the reasons a person should consider in wanting to become a Marine.

    SAEPE EXPERTUS, SEMPER FIDELIS, FRATRES AETERNI
    "Often Tested, Always Faithful, Brothers Forever"

    Barndog


  6. #6

    Barndog

    Right on the money bro !!! I tried to follow the footsteps o my Dad and two uncles........I had big shoes to fill..........I didn't quite git em filled, but did the best I could !!! Seems like durin my hitch the left shoe wuz on the right foot and visa versa sometimes !!

    That ususally happened whenever I ran into some smart mouth azzhole left winger war protestin civilian off base that had a mouth and ego bigger than his brains !!!



  7. #7
    Registered User Free Member Barndog's Avatar
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    As Joe T sez..... ain't nuttin but a thang... You did what many only dream of, as did I.
    Ain't no man or woman who never earned the uniform gonna take that from us. And fvck 'em if they don't like it.

    SAEPE EXPERTUS, SEMPER FIDELIS, FRATRES AETERNI
    "Often Tested, Always Faithful, Brothers Forever"

    Barndog


  8. #8
    "cut the head of the snake"..."nip it at the bud"


  9. #9
    I can still remember the pain and suffering and my friends that were killed and maimed in Vietnam. Just so the draft dogers could stay free and not have to carry the same weight our brothers did. I hate those basterds and always will.
    Semper Fi, Welcome home
    Thundercat


  10. #10
    Member Free Member wrbones's Avatar
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    I signed on the dotted line so that no one could ever tell me to shut up. I did my part, little as it was, so that my freedoms could never be infringed upon.

    Others around here have sacrificed more. Others less. We all did our time fer similiar reasons. Freedom is first and foremost.

    Freedom entails responsibility. Those who avoided the call to serve have left responsibility behind and have become usurpers of freedom, often entangling others in their lies and propganda.

    May such as they live their lives in hell and suffer accordingly


  11. #11
    I was too young for 'Nam, I came in after Beirut. It always ticks me off to hear someone badmouth the Corps or the military in general. If the wimps don't have the guts to fight for their country, then they should have the decency to respect those of us who were willing to lay it on the line.

    My dad served in the Navy in WWII. He instilled in me a healthy respect for veterans whether they fought in a war or not. I am trying to teach that respect to my 2 young sons. I pray that they will pass on that heritage to their kids someday.


  12. #12
    firstsgtmike
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    I posted this once before, and felt this was a fitting thread to repeat it.

    Don't you feel sorry for them?
    The "I-missed- Vietnam" Guilt By Bob Greene

    "The day I turned 19, I went down for my physical and had my first and only experience of Army life. I took with me a letter from Dr. Murphy, my childhood doctor, describing in uncompromising detail the asthma that had been a major part of my life up to 16."

    Thus begins a article by Christopher Buckley in the September issue of Esquire magazine - an article that should spur millions of members of a generation of American men to question a part of their lives that they had thought they put behind them long ago.

    Buckley - the son of conservative columnist William F. Buckley Jr. - describes in the article how he had received a medical deferment from the Army, and thus how he had escaped going to Vietnam. The article is titled "Viet Guilt, " and it addresses itself to those millions of young American men who did not go to Vietnam - and who are beginning to realize, all these years later, that by not going they may have proved something about their own lack of courage - their own, lack of manhood, if you will - that ought to make them very uncomfortable.

    Enough words have been devoted to the moral issues of the war. The point that Chris Buckley makes is that, if the truth were really to be told, most of the men who managed to stay home from Vietnam did not do so for reasons of morality alone. Their real reason for not going was that they did not want to die, did not want to get shot at. And they found out that there were many ways to avoid Vietnam.

    Young men of my generation got out of Vietnam because of college deferments, because of medical deferments, because of having a "lucky" number in the Selective Service birthday lottery that was initiated toward the end of the war. Three million men of fighting age went to Indochina during the Vietnam War; 16 million men of fighting age did not. Buckley was one of the men who did not - and I was, too. Reading his article made me realize the truth of the emotions I have been feeling lately about that particular subject. I sense a strong feeling - "shame" is not too strong a word - among many men who did not go to Vietnam, and perhaps now is the time to bring that feeling out into the open. Those of us who did not go may have pretended that we held some moral superiority over those who did, but we must have known - even back then - that that was largely sham. A tiny, tiny minority served jail terms - the rest of us avoided the war through easier methods. The men who went to Vietnam were no more involved with the politics of the war than we were. They were different from us in only two important ways: They hadn't figured out a successful way to get out of going, and they had a certain courage that we lacked.

    Not "courage" as defined the way we liked to define it; not "courage" in the sense of opposing the government's policies in Vietnam. But courage in an awful, day-to-day sense; courage in being willing to be over there while most of their generation stayed home. When I meet men my age who are Vietnam veterans, I find myself reacting the same way that Chris Buckley indicates he does. I find myself automatically feeling a little lacking. "I have friends who served in Vietnam..." Buckley writes. "They all saw death up close every day, and many days dealt with it themselves." They're married, happy, secure, good at what they do; they don't have nightmares and they don't shoot up gas stations with M-16s. Each has a gentleness I find rare in most others, and beneath it a spiritual sinew that I ascribe to their experience in the war .I don't think I'll ever have what they have, the aura of " I have been weighed on the scales and have not been found wanting", and my sense at this point is that I will always feel the lack of it..."

    I think many of us are just beginning to realize that. I know when I meet those men of my generation who did serve in Vietnam, I automatically feel less worthy than they are; yes, less of a man, if you want to use that phrase. Those of us who did not have to go to Vietnam may have felt, at the time, that we were getting away with something; may have felt, at the time, that we were the recipients of a particular piece of luck that had value beyond price. But now, I think, we realize that by not having had to go we lost forever the chance to learn certain things about ourselves that only men who have been in war together will ever truly know.

    Our fathers learned those things in World War II; our sons, God forbid, may learn them in some future conflict. But we - those of us who did not go - managed to avoid something that would have helped form us into different people than we are now. Buckley writes "by not putting on uniforms, we forfeited what might have been the ultimate opportunity, in increasingly self-obsessed times, of making the ultimate commitment to something greater than ourselves, the survival of comrades."

    But I think it may go even beyond that; I think it may go to the very definition of our manhood. I know that when I meet a man who, it turns out, has served in Vietnam, part of me wonders whether he is able to read my mind. I don't know how widespread this feeling is among men of my generation who didn't go; but I can testify that, at least for some of us, it's there, all right.

    ---------------------

    Since the above article appeared in Esquire magazine this month, I guess a lot of those folks are having second thoughts.

    MY comment is:

    FEELING SORRY FOR YOURSELF IN NO WAY MAKES UP FOR THE **** THAT YOU CAUSED BY PROVIDING AID AND COMFORT TO THE ENEMY. I may have your belated respect, but you sure as **** don't have mine. Not now, not ever.

    Semper Fi


  13. #13
    Amen, Brother (oops, I mean Top). Well said.

    Semper Fidelis, Frank


  14. #14
    Marine Free Member
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    Dodging the draft?

    Let me count the ways:

    1. Be the fortunate son, one of the silver spoon set to get a much coveted week end warrior spot in the guard/reserve.
    2. Get married (didn't always apply).
    3. Be a student.
    4. Belong to the clergy.
    5. Be an apprentice.
    7.Be Gay (didn't always work).
    8. Go to Canada
    9. Got to Jail
    10. Declare yourself a conscientious objector (didn't always keep you out of the Army).

    Hey, its been 30 yrs since the last draft, get over it.


  15. #15
    To all of you who fought, well done. To all those who died, rest in peace. To all those who fight for freedom, fight on!


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