We need to step up and give more of our wealth......to those in need.
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  1. #1
    Super Moderator Platinum Member Mongoose's Avatar
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    We need to step up and give more of our wealth......to those in need.

















    Loma Lopez has worked since she was a small child, when she picked peaches, potatoes and other produce beside her parents, who were migrant workers in the fields of California.
    But Lopez's work life ended in April, when she was laid off by the school where she’d worked for 16 years because of the coronavirus pandemic. Lopez, 76, could no longer afford her $1,500 rent. And now she and her great-great-grandson are homeless, living with friends.
    “This happened, and everything is upside down,’’ says Lopez, who will now rely on $800 a month in Social Security payments – an amount she believes would have been greater if she’d been paid fairly throughout her working life. “I know now that I should have gotten paid more … But I did not have an education."’
    At a time when the nation is reeling from the twin crises of an economic downturn and a global pandemic, long-standing gaps in pay are exacerbating the struggles of many Black women and Latinas who can barely make ends meet.
    Among Latinas, 51% do not currently have enough money to pay for basic needs like food and housing, while 48% of Black women cannot cover such fundamental expenses, according to a survey commissioned by the Time's Up Foundation and conducted by the firm PerryUndem.
    No way to pay the bills: Amid coronavirus pandemic, missed rent and mortgage payments are piling up in nearly every state
    Workers unite: A 'Strike for Black Lives' will bring together workers calling for end to systemic racism
    Many more lack a financial cushion to fall back on, with 60% of Latinas and 55% of Black women saying they have less than $200 in savings.
    "We've known for a very long time that women, especially women of color, are breadwinners,'' says Jennifer Klein, chief strategy and policy officer at Time's Up, who added that these women additionally take on many unpaid tasks at home. "We also know, sadly, that we don't have sufficient public policies and private sector practices to support these two roles that they play, and I think the pandemic has only magnified and made this situation worse.''
    Latinas bear biggest financial losses

    The challenges faced by Latinas and Black women – who on average make 54 cents and 62 cents, respectively, for every dollar earned by a white man – are being compounded by COVID-19, a virus that has led to the deaths of nearly 150,000 Americans, erased 14.7 million jobs, and is disproportionately impacting the physical and financial health of communities of color.
    Worker come together: A 'Strike for Black Lives' will bring together workers calling for end to systemic racism
    Latinas are most likely to say their work has been impacted by the pandemic with 72% saying they have lost a job, hours or pay. Among those who are working, 61% say their jobs require them to leave home in the midst of the health crisis, the largest segment of any group. And nearly 6 in 10 Latinas say they've not felt safe on the job amid the health crisis.
    Those pressures come as, 29% of Latinas are caring for an ill or elderly loved one – more than any other segment of Americans. And Latinas worry most that juggling those responsibilities will hurt their chances to get a raise or promotion.
    Mental health issues are also most acute among Latinas, with 54% saying they experience panic or anxiety at least once a week – though many other groups are also struggling.
    Among all women, 44% are regularly feeling emotional distress, compared with 31% of men. And 43% of white women, 37% of Black women and 35% of Asian American women have felt anxious during the pandemic.
    "When I look at ... the number of women who are crying themselves to sleep, that's the reality of what women are going through as they do the uncompensated care at home and try to figure out what to do with their jobs,'' says Tina Tchen, head of Time's Up. "Over the long term, that’s going to take a real toll if we don’t address it.’’
    Race and gender matters

    Meanwhile, 40% of Black women say someone at their job has said or implied that they don’t work as hard as others because of their gender, race or responsibilities at home, compared with 37% of Latinas and 31% of white women who had similar experiences.
    Black women were also least likely to feel that they had a job that provided them with the ability to pay their bills, put money aside and also maintain their health, with 42% saying they had such stability, compared with 51% of Latinas and 54% of white women.
    Ash Girtley, 29, is a manager at a Peet’s Coffee in Chicago. But at several of the other chains where she worked over the last ten years, Girtley says she struggled to gain promotions despite her experience.
    “They always labeled the Black female as difficult,’’ said Girtley, who has a bachelor’s degree in criminal justice. “Being Black and being a woman on top of that in the fast food industry, I can’t get ahead.’’

    Ash Girtley is struggling to make ends meet amid the coronavirus pandemic


    Even before the pandemic, her $16 an hour wages meant money was tight and saving was hard. But now, partly because she is a caretaker for her mother, Girtley says her schedule has been pared from roughly 40 hours to as few as 12 hours a week. The $13,000 she struggled to sock away has been whittled down to $2,400, the money going toward groceries, car repairs and other bills.
    “I sell dinners out of my house just to get by because it’s not enough for me to live off the wages I’m making right now,’’ she says. But “I can’t crack. I’ve got a house depending on me.”
    Many of those surveyed said they were aware of inequities in expectations as well as pay. Among married women with younger children, only 42% said they could take a good paying job that lacked flexible hours and required them to prioritize work over their responsibilities at home. That's compared with 56% of married fathers who said they'd be able to grab such a professional opportunity.
    And among men who play a role in hiring, 1 in 3 believed that male applicants should be given priority for getting the job when work is scarce.
    "That means we don't understand the number of women who are the ... engines of our economy,'' Tchen says. ''And so that's the long-term battle that we still have to fight.''
    A tipping point?

    There was some promising news, with 83% of those surveyed saying that in the midst of the current economic crisis, equal pay for women remains just as or more critical an issue.
    And women were clear about what they needed to address the pay gap and other inequities, including child care, more flexible work schedules and paid sick leave.
    "This data makes visible what has for too long been invisible,'' Klein says. "I never use the word 'opportunity,' but I think this moment may be a tipping point that both demands big structural changes (and) also makes them possible.''

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  2. #2
    “They always labeled the Black female as difficult,’’ said Girtley, who has a bachelor’s degree in criminal justice. “Being Black and being a woman on top of that in the fast food industry, I can’t get ahead.’’


    ANYTHING ELSE these people can find to complain about??? As for the woman with the "bachelor’s degree in criminal justice", why is she "flipping burgers" (or whatever) when she COULD be a police officer... UNLESS of course, she has a criminal record, or she just went for a CJ degree so she can become a "street lawyer", constantly looking to try to pin some "wrongdoing" on the local cops.... “They always labeled the Black female as difficult,’’ ... But at several of the other chains where she worked over the last ten years, Girtley says she struggled to gain promotions despite her experience. Might this be because SHE IS "DIFFICULT"???? why else would she "not get promoted, and work for several other chains over a 10 year period"???

    Most I can say for this bunch is BOO HOO, put your "Big Girl" pants on and go get a decent JOB... "flipping burgers IS NOT a "career path"....

    Si vis pacem, para bellum

  3. #3
    From experience I believe that "black females are difficult" is because of one main reason; Get ready for it.

    BLACK FEMALES ARE DIFFICULT


  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by advanced View Post
    From experience I believe that "black females are difficult" is because of one main reason; Get ready for it.

    BLACK FEMALES ARE DIFFICULT
    :

    Si vis pacem, para bellum

  5. #5
    Super Moderator Platinum Member Mongoose's Avatar
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    Damn Russ....you would be difficult too...if you had 9 kids by 107 different Men and not one of them helping you.


  6. #6
    The only people getting my stuff when I die is my family. Fock all the non workers
    with there hands out.


  7. #7

    Give dem girls a head



  8. #8
    Super Moderator Platinum Member Mongoose's Avatar
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  9. #9
    How It Came to This - American Renaissance

    10-12 minutes


    What is the source of this madness?
    How did it come to this? And by “this” I mean not just the 10 days of rioting after the death of George Floyd, but the psychological collapse of whites that followed. Billions of dollars in riot damage can be repaired; the psychological damage is more serious. Consider this. [0:00 – 0:30] This young couples agreed to lick the boots of blacks. [0:00 – 0:18] This woman does the same. [[00:42 – 1:02] I don’t believe there has ever been a time in the history of the world when a black person could persuade a white person — just passing by — to get on her knees, right on the side walk.
    There was a similar, maybe not quite so degrading ceremony in Congress. Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senator Charles Schumer stayed on their knees for nine minutes to honor George Floyd. They wore African kinte cloth and bowed their heads. George Floyd was a criminal with a long record. If American senators and congresswomen have ever knelt like this to honor another American, I haven’t heard of it. Not George Washington, not John Kennedy, not anybody. Have they ever even knelt on the cold, hard floors of Congress to worship God? I doubt it.
    When a nation is defeated, it pays tribute. America has been defeated. Looters pillaged Apple stores all over the country. Apple’s reaction? It promised $100 million for black causes. Here are blacks looting ritzy stores in Beverly Hills and Santa Monica. I’m sure that like virtually every major corporation in America they have also promised to pay tribute. Do you think that after the race riots of the 1960s or even the LA riots of 1992, businesses rewarded the people who sacked their stores. No. This is a new era. [0:30 – 0:56]
    What is behind this unprecedented surrender? A delusion — I would even call it a kind of madness. It’s the belief that the United States is viciously racist. “Here is a headline from the Guardian: “In America, Black Deaths Are Not a Flaw in the System. They Are the System.” It’s now common on the left to think that blacks are treated so horribly that they are justified in rioting, and that anyone who opposes looting and arson is a racist. Joyce Kenner has been the principal of Whitney Young High School in Chicago for 25 years and worked for Al Sharpton before that. Here she is with her arm raised at a school event. When she urged her students to demonstrate but stay away from violence and looting, “disappointed alumni” got up more than 800 petitions calling for her to resign.
    David Shor was a data analyst for Civis Analytics. His job was to try to help Democrats win elections. He tweeted a reference to a paper that found that in 1968, when there were race riots, it raised the Republican share of the vote. He was worried that the George Floyd riots might make people vote Republican this year. Work colleagues and clients said this was anti-black and “threatened their safety.” Mr. Shor apologized, but “Civis Analytics undertook a review of the episode. A few days later, Shor was fired.”
    This is new. A certified anti-racist was fired for pointing out that looting and arson might hurt Democrats.
    How did blacks achieve this exalted status? Why do white people kneel before them, kiss their boots, pay ransom money to the people who loot their stores, and lose their jobs if they criticize black mob violence? Strange as it may seem, this is the inevitable logic of an idea that has its roots as far back as the Declaration of Independence.
    The phrase, “all men are created equal,” has been more shamelessly misinterpreted than any words in all of American history, but you could argue those words put in motion what we are seeing today. Equality has been on the march ever since, and by the mid-20th century it had reached a point that would have shocked the Founding Fathers. In 1950, the United States put its signature on a UNESCO document that stated: “For all practical social purposes ‘race’ is not so much a biological phenomenon as a social myth.” The next year, the United States endorsed a UNESCO declaration that said, “Available scientific knowledge provides no basis for believing that the groups of mankind differ in their innate capacity for intellectual and emotional development.”
    In June 1965, at a commencement speech at Howard University, President Lyndon Johnson laid out the principles of what euphemistically became known as “affirmative action.” He said this: We seek . . . not just equality as a right and a theory but equality as a fact and equality as a result. . . .To this end equal opportunity is essential, but not enough, not enough. The president pointed to black/white differences in achievement, and explained their cause: “They are solely and simply the consequence of ancient brutality, past injustice, and present prejudice.” And even when he mentioned the breakdown in black families, he said, “For this, most of all, white America must accept responsibility.”
    The message was clear: Blacks are not responsible for failure of any kind. Whites are. And over the years, it became impossible to have a different view.
    Blacks rioted every summer for four straight years in the 1960s. The Kerner commission was appointed to look into the causes, and found that the problem was white people: “What white Americans have never fully understood — but what the Negro can never forget — is that white society is deeply implicated in the ghetto. White institutions created it, white institutions maintain it, and white society condones it.” The problems of blacks are all our fault.
    We spent trillions of dollars on welfare and education, gave blacks preferences in hiring and college admissions, hunted down and denounced every trace of racism, set up black role models, made Martin Luther King a national hero, and we elected a black president. Nothing changed. Blacks are still way behind, and it’s still our fault.
    Ibram X. Kendi is the director of the Antiracist Research & Policy Center at American University. He wants an amendment to the US Constitution that would make it clear that: “Racial inequity is evidence of racist policy and the different racial groups are equals. Prof. Kendi, we don’t need an amendment. That’s already what everyone must absolutely believe. Blacks and whites are inherently equal in every way, so any difference in achievement is our fault. Whites make blacks kill each other at 12 times the rate whites kill each other. Whites make blacks have so many out-of-wedlock babies that their illegitimacy rate is close to 80 percent. Whites are grinding blacks down so badly that their median household wealth is just one tenth that of whites.
    But, wait a minute. Who are the horrible people who are doing that? Who is making them shoot each other and get pregnant? This country has been completely fumigated for racists. Not even the wildest anti-racists can find people who are doing that. Of course, when they find someone who says “all lives matter” at the wrong time, they treat him as if he wanted to bring back slavery.
    The truth is, white people don’t make black people misbehave. How would they do that even if they wanted to? And so, to explain black failure we had to invent racism without racists. That is the purpose of fancy ideas like “systemic racism,” “implicit bias,” and “white privilege.”
    Lefties admit that you can have racism without racists. Robin DeAngelo is today’s hottest anti-racism guru. She scoffs at what she calls, “The simplistic idea that racism is limited to individual intentional acts committed by unkind people.” That means you can be an earnest, anti-racist white and still oppress black people. As she says, ““White progressives do indeed uphold and perpetrate racism.” All those white people walking around with “black lives matter” signs are perpetrating racism. How?
    A sociology professor wrote in USA Today: “All college students should take a mandatory course on black history and white privilege.” Emily Walton teaches a course like that at Dartmouth. She says it’s her white students who learn the most because, and I quote, “they understand that being a good person does not make them innocent.” You can be a genuinely good person but you’re still the reason why black people are poor and shoot each other.
    And you will never be innocent. As author and activist Tema Okum explains: “From White Racist to White Anti-Racist: is a Life-Long Journey.”
    How do white people who are trying so hard to be good become a deadly menace to blacks? Robin DeAngelo has the answer: We are, as she puts it, “conditioned into a white supremacist worldview .” She says that “The ubiquitous socializing power of white supremacy cannot be avoided. The messages circulate 24-7.” What? I don’t see those messages. Do you? Who’s sending them? Space aliens?
    White supremacy is like witchcraft or the black death. It’s an evil force that circulates 24/7. I guess it emanates from the minds of even the best and most virtuous white people. And black people are such helpless puppets that they collapse into degeneracy at the slightest touch of this evil force.
    This kind of nuttiness used to be bottled up on college campuses, but now ordinary people talk about white privilege and say cuckoo things like “White silence is violence.”
    So, America has a new theory of race relations. Whites make life miserable for black people without even trying, even when they are doing their best to be good to blacks. It’s the way we are. We can’t help it no matter how hard we try, and we can’t be cured.
    This is obviously crazy, but it’s what we’re stuck with when we have *no other explanation* for unequal results in a country that requires — demands — complete equality.
    Is it possible — is it conceivable — that unequal racial results might — just might — have something to do with the nature of blacks? With how they are and what they do? No. Impossible. Even to ask that question will make 17 black people shoot each other in Chicago this weekend. And asking it will get you thrown off the internet.
    And that’s how it came to this. And that’s why there is no solution. No amount of bootlicking, no amount of money, not even every white person on his knees every day can solve this problem. Eventually, it will solve itself. As the Roman poet Horace wrote more than 2,000 years ago: “You may drive out nature with a pitchfork, but she will always return.”


  10. #10
    How long have you been off your meds? If you are going to copy and paste someone else's opinion,you should at least post a link like this. https://www.amren.com/videos/2020/06...-came-to-this/


  11. #11
    My meds are fine squid, when I tried to post the link I got a message saying I couldn't because I'm a newbie. So I copied and pasted text only. Credit to American Renaissance is in the title.


  12. #12
    SOMEBODY is on some SERIOUS meds.... like the AUTHOR of this unbelievable collection of pure GARBAGE..... it appears that since blacks refuse to accept responsibility for their own actions, that the "powers that be" are attempting to force whites to accept responsibility for them.... it also appears that the author has spent too much tile reading Mein Kampf and watching too many programs about Nazi supremacy on the history channel... the simple TRUTH of the matter is that unfortunately for whites as a whole, and for some blacks as well, there are far too many "people of color" that simply do not know how to behave, and resist any and all attempts to teach them how to behave like civilized human beings.... these people prefer to live like they did 1000 years ago in the wilds of Africa, stealing from other tribes, killing each other, raping any woman they pleased, whenever they pleased, and generally acting like the wild animals that they shared the jungle with... the wild animals, however, were more "civilized" than the people, inasmuch as the animals only killed for food or to defend themselves.... sorry, libs, there is no amount of coercion, attempted intimidation, indoctrination, or out and out demanding that is going to make me accept responsibility for the actions of anyone other than myself, and most certainly not for the misbehavior of the "black race" as a whole.... to "misquote" Mr Obozo, " I did not build that"....

    Si vis pacem, para bellum

  13. #13
    Super Moderator Platinum Member Mongoose's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by advanced View Post
    From experience I believe that "black females are difficult" is because of one main reason; Get ready for it.

    BLACK FEMALES ARE DIFFICULT


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  14. #14
    Yes, I need to give more to those in need. It's been too long since I made a donation to the Semper Fi fund to help my wounded brothers and sisters, and I'm going to rectify that today.


  15. #15
    yes, the "needy" do need help... and they need a BATH.... I say we should "help the needy take a bath".... man the fire hoses, surround those "protesters", and give them a good washdown.....

    Si vis pacem, para bellum

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