The Old Days - Page 12
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  1. #166
    Our shoes had also been brown, but they were dyed before we received them and we were taught to spit shine them. Our utilities were sent to the cleaners, we got to wear a fresh pair once a week if we needed a change or not. We did use the wash racks, for our socks and skivvies. We scrubbed the deck also, on our hands and knees with a wash cloth. No brooms, mops, etc.


  2. #167
    some of those "brown shoes" were still around in 66, and the guys that got them had to scrub them with a brillo pad to clean off the preservative so that black dye would take properly.... then they had to be spit shined, as did our combat boots and barracks cove bills.... no more spit shining these days, shined combat boots are a big no-no, and the shoes and cover bills are high gloss corfram, which is nothing but a fancy name for patent leather..... we used those wash racks to wash everything, including utilities, but after the first 4 weeks, we got to send a laundry bag of whites and a set of utilities to the laundry... after the rifle range and getting close to graduation, we got to have our utilities starched, man, what memories..... something else that isn't done anymore, polishing the pipes in the head... those brass drain pipes and water pipes had to shine like new money, or we were in trouble...


  3. #168
    We spit shined our shoes after we dyed them from brown to black. Our DIs explained to us that cloth baby diapers were the best thing to use, so write home and have your folks send you some.

    My mother bought a package and sent it to me unopened. Unfortunately, it had a minature baby bottle in it, and I was called up in front of our platoon of 81 after I filled the bottle with water, got on my knees, and drank the baby bottle via the nipple, while the DI burped me once in awhile, screaming at me to sound off with those burps. LOL.


  4. #169
    We scrubbed the decks, in boot camp, on our hands and knees with scrub brushes, but now I understand that that is totally prohibited, due to knee injuries.

    Can't be too careful nowadays, might ruin the lives of recruits.

    Someday, at this rate, boot camp will assign one DI per recruit, so the entire thing is one on one, and a portion of it will be able to be completed online, with a recording of a DI hollering.


  5. #170
    Within ten or twenty years, you will be discharged if it can be shown, in a court, that you are not gay or lesbian or transgender. Some will be allowed to stay in if they sign on the dotted line that they agree to conform to society and will have the required operation. No stray black sheep in the Corps. Ask and tell will be the new motto.


  6. #171
    once again, I'm glad that I was able to retire wearing my Dress Blues, and did not have to wear a blue dress instead.....


  7. #172
    Good one, William.


  8. #173
    If you recall, we were scared of Lance Corporals and above, upon graduation from boot camp. They were light years above us.

    My mother came down to PI for graduation, and we are in the PX and lo and behold who is browsing the aisle next to us but the commanding general, Raymond L. Murray.

    My mom sees him, says to me, oh let's go over and SAY HELLO, and I was petrified, I almost blurted out a swear word but caught myself in time. I said no ma, I gotta get outta here and wait outside if you're going to do that!!! and she said, oh, come on, he seems like such a nice man.

    Well, I flew out of there and stood at attention outside unnecessarily, and saw them talking inside the PX, and she was pointing at me and he was smiling and nodding his head and I was making plans to go to the brig. LOL.

    It is amazing how even the Lance Corporals serving chow in the mess hall, slamming food down on our metal trays, commanded our respect.


  9. #174
    Another thing about The Old Days---we had no thirst for "information". We were not on this quest to learn all there is to know about everything in the world. There were no personal computers, no cell phones, and so we had very few questions in life. We lived life as we went along. The Marine Corps handed us our jobs, our MOS, with no input from us except Aviation Guaranteed, as they called it.

    And here's the main point---we didn't even CARE that we had virtually no info about anything. We could have cared less about what kind of fast food places were on bases that we were headed to. We didn't even ask about MOS schools, because it was not an object of curiosity.

    We didn't have to know. We lived our lives, as I said, as things happened. Of course we planned for this and that, but we were not obsessed or even much interested in knowing IN DETAIL what we were about to experience. We lived in a different world than today, where there was much more common sense, less worrying about things, and very few people minded everyone else's business.


  10. #175
    #173 & 174 HOW TRUE, Dave.... somewhere along the line the country developed this concept that everyone is ENTITLED to KNOW everything about everything and everyone, the idea of privacy and/or secrecy is as foreign to them as a cell phone would have been to us in 1955 (when we were just kids).... I cannot imagine exactly how this came about, but today it seems that even (especially) the government has no right to keep information of any kind out of the public domain, where even things that should be rated as "beyond top secret" and only those with a "need to know" should have access are reported on social media, in magazines, and even on TV... is it any wonder that we've got problems????.....


  11. #176
    True, William, and I am not an expert on cultural history, BUT, this info mania seems to be because it is available. Whatever is available, we take it and run. Now, this happened, as far as I know, with the radio.

    In the 1920s the radio actually CREATED demands for certain products. Now, after hearing radio commercials about this and that, folks had to have them, and they became necessities rather than luxuries.

    The same thing happened with the Iroquois in New York State. The Five Nations, later six, hunted with bow and arrow, for generations----the white man came along, and trade developed, and after awhile, the Indians (or Native Americans if you can't stand using the word Indian that's been used for hundreds of years and only nowadays fell out of favor)----the Indians forgot how to hunt, and they became dependent on tools, utensils, etc of the white man.

    Luxuries became necessities. The luxury of a cell phone became as necessary as food and drink, and maybe even more so. These things being in existence, create an atmosphere of having to use them, to gain info, to find out every little detail one can find out. I see Marines here who are asking us what this and that is available at 29 Palms or at Camp Lejeune. Who gives a fk what is available there, find out when you arrive.


  12. #177
    So, basically, if the information is out there, people must have it, they must obtain it. Just the availability of it creates a need for it. Bizarre? Yes.


  13. #178
    Quote Originally Posted by USMC 2571 View Post
    True, William, and I am not an expert on cultural history, BUT, this info mania seems to be because it is available. Whatever is available, we take it and run. Now, this happened, as far as I know, with the radio.

    In the 1920s the radio actually CREATED demands for certain products. Now, after hearing radio commercials about this and that, folks had to have them, and they became necessities rather than luxuries.

    The same thing happened with the Iroquois in New York State. The Five Nations, later six, hunted with bow and arrow, for generations----the white man came along, and trade developed, and after awhile, the Indians (or Native Americans if you can't stand using the word Indian that's been used for hundreds of years and only nowadays fell out of favor)----the Indians forgot how to hunt, and they became dependent on tools, utensils, etc of the white man.

    Luxuries became necessities. The luxury of a cell phone became as necessary as food and drink, and maybe even more so. These things being in existence, create an atmosphere of having to use them, to gain info, to find out every little detail one can find out. I see Marines here who are asking us what this and that is available at 29 Palms or at Camp Lejeune. Who gives a fk what is available there, find out when you arrive.





    EXACTLY... and do your "finding out" AFTER you have managed to master the duties that are expected of you... "what's there" is NOT the reason you are going there.....


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