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  1. #1
    Marine Friend Free Member knagle's Avatar
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    Multiple questions

    #1. I currently have a GED, spoke with my academic advisor, and they said 15-18 credits are very doable, and common with full time students. I can not start the enlistment process until I finish the 15 credits. Do you think it would be likely that a recruiter would allow me to join in the Poolee workouts?

    2. I know very little about the Marine Corps, other than a recruiter, where could I get somewhat reliable information? Are YouTubers such as NavatheBeast a decent source of information?

    3. What is the enlistment process like, and how long does it generally take? How long is the average Poolee in DEP?

    4. Is there any way to promote before or during boot camp/SOI?

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  2. #2
    1. Absolutely! And they'll absolutely love of you bring along some qualified friends. PT isn't just for Poolees.

    2. PT is actually a good place to learn about the Marine Corps as well. In addition to PT just Google what you're interested in. Almost everything about the Marine Corps can be found online, even the smells of boot camp. You all are blessed to live in the information age.

    3. Once qualified and approved by MEPS you fill out a bunch of paperwork and head to MEPS to take the ASVAB and physical. The process is quite long and typing up every detail would take a lot of time. Instead, check Google for a good description. DEP can last up to 365 days. In rare cases someone can be in the DEP for less than a day. These are called "kiss n ships". They go through the enlistment process and ship the same day. For someone out of high school who has a good IST score shipping should come pretty fast after enlisting, unless the Poolee explicitly states he wants to wait for whatever reason or his job isn't available.

    4. Yes, exceptional performance will get you a promotion. Getting referrals to your recruiter will also get you promoted.


  3. #3
    Marine Friend Free Member knagle's Avatar
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    Alright. I will contact my local recruiter tomorrow, so I can start doing PT. I figure it'll get me in extra good shape for boot camp, and help me perform better physically. What kind of workouts are typical for the PT sessions? Would there happen to be a lot of pool time? I believe that is where I struggle the most. I can swim, but I unfortunately tread water about as well as a rock.


  4. #4
    Good luck to you, OP! Keep us posted on how you're doing.


  5. #5
    Marine Friend Free Member knagle's Avatar
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    Thank you. I certainly will do that.


  6. #6
    There are a ton of videos on youtube about prebootcamp workouts, bootcamp, swim qualification, The Crucible, a day in the life of Marines in various job specialties, etc. Just search what you're looking for.

    The job (MOS) you get after bootcamp will be determined by your ASVAB (aptitude test) score, security clearance, etc. The higher ASVAB score you attain, more jobs you'll be qualified for. You can find study guides online, at a bookstore, or at your local public library.

    My niece was platoon guide and a squad leader at Parris Island. She graduated meritorious Private First Class (PFC) which put her one pay grade above her peers. After bootcamp, she was the class leader and honor graduate out of her formal MOS school and received another meritorious promotion to Lance Corporal, putting her two pay grades ahead of her peers. Evidence the Marine Corps does recognize and reward superior performance.

    Good luck.


  7. #7
    Marine Friend Free Member knagle's Avatar
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    Tennessee Top, I hope you don't mind me snopping, but, I seen you were a Marine Security Guard. That is one thing I would be interested in later on in my career. What would I need to do to obtain that job?


  8. #8
    Have Tenn Top write you a letter or make a call. Seriously, those jobs are hard to come by. Look at his profile. It would have been easier to list the places he has NOT been to. Impressive record in the Corps. But not easy to get those kinds of positions.

    First things first, though...concentrate on getting thru boot camp with flying colors. Other things will come or not come to you.


  9. #9
    Marine Friend Free Member knagle's Avatar
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    I certainly have to focus on becoming, and then being a Marine. If my research is correct, you have to be at least a Lance Corporal to volunteer for special assignments, such as this. I'm sure that I will have to have an exceptional record as well. I was kind of looking for a direction in which to take the small steps.


  10. #10
    Sounds to me like you'll do all right. BECAUSE, you have that quality called "motivation", and you're also interested in this stuff, and will do your best. Things will come to you, and sometimes you will have to pursue things in order to get them, but I like your interest in achieving as much as you can.


  11. #11
    Marine Friend Free Member knagle's Avatar
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    Thank you, I surely hope I'll do alright. Would you happen to know anything about other specialized schools/MOSs? Wanting to keep my options open.


  12. #12
    I have a passion for the MSG program. Otherwise, I never would've invested 8 years of my 22 year career in some capacity related to it. I'll touch on a few points but apologize in advance if I go off on a tangent which I'm apt to do.

    Visit their website and click on the "Become a MSG" tab on the top left to learn about eligibility requirements, screening, training, mission, etc. www.mcesg.marines.mil

    The duty. It is important to understand MSG duty itself is not glamorous. It is interior guard duty (no walking posts outside). The main post (Post 1) is a standing post inside a hardened booth inside the lobby and controls access into and out of the embassy. There may be secondary posts in the consular section, roving patrols, ambassador's official residence, etc. Shifts are normally 8 hours long. After hours, when the embassy is closed for business, there is absolutely nothing glamorous about watching security cameras and listening to the embassy radio network for 8 hours.

    The program. The program itself (off duty) can be glamorous, depending on the post. There are exotic posts like Rio, Rome, Paris, Bangkok, etc. There are communist bloc countries like China, Russia, Cuba, etc. There are Muslim countries like Turkey, Iraq, Saudi Arabia, etc. And there are third world countries like Haiti, Sudan, etc. MSG's are invited to, and obligated to attend diplomatic receptions. These are opportunities to meet both US and host nation diplomats and high-ranking government officials.

    Tattoos. Don't get one. The MSG program's tattoo policy is more restrictive than the Marine Corps'. Many nations do not share our infatuation with body art and find it offensive or against their religion. MSG's must be available for worldwide assignment so tattoos are something the screening teams look at closely. I was on the screening team for 6 months.

    Maturity. The two most important traits for a MSG are maturity and integrity. The Department of State (DOS) will not turn over the keys to their embassies and entrust the lives of their employees as well as the security of their classified information to a kid just out of highschool. That's why you have to spend a couple years in the fleet first where these traits can be demonstrated. You can be the best grunt in your infantry battalion but not what the screening team is looking for. I had two former Drill Instructors in my student detachment commander class who didn't make it through the first week of school (because they thought they were still pushing recruits). DOS has a vote in who makes it through school too. There are two formal screening boards at the schoolhouse with a representative from the DOS' Diplomatic Security. These two are on top of the screening team just to get orders to the school. The attrition rate in my student Detachment Commanders class was 50%.


  13. #13
    First, it is quite an honor to be chosen for that kind of duty, and an honor in itself to even be considered for it. Quite an achievement.

    Kragle---may I point out just one thing? That prior to having an MOS, a person has no firm concrete definite idea about exactly what that MOS entails in its entirety. So a particular MOS might sound great, but actually is not, and a boring-sounding MOS might turn out to be the best job you ever had. But there is no way to completely know these things in advance----so be open to a variety of MOSs. Sure you have to pick one, but be open, still.----and input from people who worked in those jobs are not always reliable, if they are negative. One person's garbage job is another's dream job, depending on the individual.

    Example: Briefly, as brief as I can be----in my day we had absolutely no say in what MOS would be handed to us. We took Classification Tests in boot camp and those scores plus the ever-present Needs of The Corps determined what job we would be handed. Now, I had never heard of MOS 2571 Special Radio Operator, now called 2621 Morse Code Intercept Operator.

    I had no idea what was involved. Nor did I know if I would like it or not. But, it turned out to be the best job I ever had in my life, before or after the Corps, including my present one. No exceptions.

    That should tell you right away that you should think twice about any MOS that may seem kind of blah, ah, who wants to do THAT??

    Keep an open mind. You may end up in a job you love, whereas prior to that you would have scoffed at it.


  14. #14
    Marine Friend Free Member knagle's Avatar
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    Unfortunately, nothing in life is as glamorous as it seems. But, while I'm in, I need to make the most of my time. I think I would benefit greatly from the experience. If I choose to get out, after my contract, I would have experience many agencies are looking for. If I choose to stay in, I will get points towards promotion boards. It only makes sense to try and pursue that job.


  15. #15
    In order to make a career in the USMC, one must successfully complete a Special Duty Assignment (recruiter, drill instructor, or MSG). If you don't choose one, one will be chosen for you (when I was on the program MSG was volunteer only but don't know about today). Coming off the program as a Detachment Commander, I had orders to recruiters school but the battalion commander wanted me on the school staff in Quantico so got those orders changed. Successfully completing a Special Duty Assignment indicates you can work independently without supervision from officers and that you're flexible enough to work outside of your primary MOS (MSG's, recruiters, and DI's have secondary MOS's). Also shows a willingness to accept new challenges. Basically, a more rounded Marine exposed to more stuff.


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