questions about 1316/1341 contract
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  1. #1

    questions about 1316/1341 contract

    Hello, My name is Gaige Stanley, i am 23 years old and awaiting waiver approval to go to MEPS. If they go through i should be signing up for the DEP late January early February and i will be off to bootcamp sometime in April according to my recruiter.

    My main consideration for a MOS contract is the 1316/1341 selection and i have a few questions regarding these two.

    My first question is if anyone knows what the Marine Corps current demand is for this contract, and which of the two is most needed currently?

    I am also just looking for some vague pros/cons from people in either of these MOS's, i am continuing to use the search button for these questions but there seems to be a lack of information on this contract. if i am searching wrong and this information is out there already i apologize ahead of time.

    this contract is the only one where i feel i would enjoy all of my job options regardless of what is selected for me.

    my only real other consideration is aircraft mechanics but the contract has so many options the likelyhood of getting one i enjoy i feel is low. feel free to elaborate any comments or experience you have with this field also.

    Thank You for your time Marines.

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  2. #2
    As you can tell, I'm a 1341, so I can give you gouge on this specific MOS.

    The schoolhouse:
    The job title is Heavy (or Engineer) Equipment Mechanic. The school was about 8 weeks long in Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri. Each annex is dedicated to a specific part of the equipment, and each is about a week long (engines was 2 weeks I believe). You'll be in a class with solely Marines for the 1st annex (shop ops annex), and integrate with Army students for the remainder of the annexes. You'll have an annex on brakes, an annex on power trains (transmissions), an annex on diesel engines, an annex on hydraulic systems, and an annex on basic electrical systems. You'll also learn how to use the TMDE (Test Measurement Diagnostic Equipment) to detect voltages, current, and levels of resistance across electrical components in the vehicles.You'll learn about the administrative side of being a mechanic in the 1st annex to include using the GCSS system to fill out service and part requests, ordering parts, and completing limited technical inspection forms (LTI's). After the 1st annex, you'll begin learning more hands on knowledge as it relates to the specific equipment you work on. This includes dozers, earth movers, forklifts, etc. You'll learn the vehicle specs for each piece of equipment, learn how to use the diagnostic equipment to identify what's wrong with a vehicle when the operators bring them into your shop, and learn hands how to perform maintenance and repairs to the vehicle and replace whatever is broken. The degree of maintenance and repair you do will depend on what echelon your shop in the fleet is; however, they will teach you the basics at MOS school. In the later annexes, you'll do basic soldering, learn how to connect the vehicle batteries, and learn how to take apart and put together an engine. You'll learn how to align brake pads, and how to identify worn out brake pads. You'll also assemble and dis-assemble air dryers and other pieces of equipment on the vehicle. It's been over a year since MOS school, so my memory is hazy, I'll add things on as I remember them.

    At your unit:

    As mentioned earlier, the level of maintenance/repair you perform is dependent on what echelon your shop is. The highest echelon shops do the more complex repair and maintenance, the lower echelon shops do basic maintenance and repair. In my shop, we don't do 95% of the things we learned at MOS school. We're usually performing limited technical inspections on the vehicles, doing the monthly required preventive maintenance on the vehicles, and performing basic repairs like flushing out hydraulic and fuel systems. You'll also learn how to ground guide at your unit so you can be the operator's eyes and ears as he drives the equipment around the shop area. As soon as you approach the NCO ranks (2+ years in) you'll get the opportunity to go back to Leanord Wood to complete the Engineer Equipment Mechanic NCO Course. It has the same format as the basic course mentioned above (each section of the vehcile with an annex dedicated to it) excpet they also cover A/C systems and each annex is much more detailed and in depth. You'll also go more in depth with the administrative side of maintenance (GCSS) since senior Cpls and Sgts are the ones who actually fill out parts and service requests and put them in the system in the fleet.

    Final thoughts:

    It's a very hands on MOS up to the Sgt level. PFCs, LCpls, and Cpls are always on their feet working hands on with the equipment we're tasked with maintaining and repairing. The juinor ranks of the 1341 MOS are basically what allow the H.E. side of the Service Company component to function. Without mechs, the equipment goes deadlined, we can't move gear around, and this creates major logistical problems all the way up to Battalion level. So if you like long hours, dirty work, leaving each day smelling like fuel, oil, grease and sweat, and knowing you put a hard day's work in, this is the job for you. This is especially true during the times where the unit is conducting FSMAO inspections on all the gear from each shop and the CG wants to come and look at gear and their record jackets.

    As you reach the Sgt rank, you are less hands on working with gear on the lot, and more hands on in the platoon office handling all manners of administrative paperwork. You trade in your coveralls, dolly, and tools for cammies, a desk chair, and a desktop computer. Nothing wrong with this, still important, and it's natural career progression. As I think of more things to add on I will. Any specific questions about 1341 MOS, ask, I'll answer.


  3. #3
    USMC 2571
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    That is incredibly helpful info for the OP and other interested parties----thanks for your post, as always.


  4. #4
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    Outstanding answer !!!


  5. #5
    Outstanding! Imagine, if we could offer this type of insight into every MOS!!

    This answer is the epitome of what the "Ask A Marine" thread stands for and needs to be a sticky!!!


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    Morning Top.

    We haven't stuck threads here in over 2 years. The ownership decided it was better to group the same questions and thread answers under an OP's question like " Similar Threads ".

    This way the " Stickys " do not end up all at the top of the page everyday and thus having members scroll all the way to the bottom of the page for " New Posts ".

    Besides the other business problem it creates that I am not at liberty to discuss.


  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by LCPL1341 View Post
    As you can tell, I'm a 1341, so I can give you gouge on this specific MOS.

    The schoolhouse:
    The job title is Heavy (or Engineer) Equipment Mechanic. The school was about 8 weeks long in Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri. Each annex is dedicated to a specific part of the equipment, and each is about a week long (engines was 2 weeks I believe). You'll be in a class with solely Marines for the 1st annex (shop ops annex), and integrate with Army students for the remainder of the annexes. You'll have an annex on brakes, an annex on power trains (transmissions), an annex on diesel engines, an annex on hydraulic systems, and an annex on basic electrical systems. You'll also learn how to use the TMDE (Test Measurement Diagnostic Equipment) to detect voltages, current, and levels of resistance across electrical components in the vehicles.You'll learn about the administrative side of being a mechanic in the 1st annex to include using the GCSS system to fill out service and part requests, ordering parts, and completing limited technical inspection forms (LTI's). After the 1st annex, you'll begin learning more hands on knowledge as it relates to the specific equipment you work on. This includes dozers, earth movers, forklifts, etc. You'll learn the vehicle specs for each piece of equipment, learn how to use the diagnostic equipment to identify what's wrong with a vehicle when the operators bring them into your shop, and learn hands how to perform maintenance and repairs to the vehicle and replace whatever is broken. The degree of maintenance and repair you do will depend on what echelon your shop in the fleet is; however, they will teach you the basics at MOS school. In the later annexes, you'll do basic soldering, learn how to connect the vehicle batteries, and learn how to take apart and put together an engine. You'll learn how to align brake pads, and how to identify worn out brake pads. You'll also assemble and dis-assemble air dryers and other pieces of equipment on the vehicle. It's been over a year since MOS school, so my memory is hazy, I'll add things on as I remember them.

    At your unit:

    As mentioned earlier, the level of maintenance/repair you perform is dependent on what echelon your shop is. The highest echelon shops do the more complex repair and maintenance, the lower echelon shops do basic maintenance and repair. In my shop, we don't do 95% of the things we learned at MOS school. We're usually performing limited technical inspections on the vehicles, doing the monthly required preventive maintenance on the vehicles, and performing basic repairs like flushing out hydraulic and fuel systems. You'll also learn how to ground guide at your unit so you can be the operator's eyes and ears as he drives the equipment around the shop area. As soon as you approach the NCO ranks (2+ years in) you'll get the opportunity to go back to Leanord Wood to complete the Engineer Equipment Mechanic NCO Course. It has the same format as the basic course mentioned above (each section of the vehcile with an annex dedicated to it) excpet they also cover A/C systems and each annex is much more detailed and in depth. You'll also go more in depth with the administrative side of maintenance (GCSS) since senior Cpls and Sgts are the ones who actually fill out parts and service requests and put them in the system in the fleet.

    Final thoughts:

    It's a very hands on MOS up to the Sgt level. PFCs, LCpls, and Cpls are always on their feet working hands on with the equipment we're tasked with maintaining and repairing. The juinor ranks of the 1341 MOS are basically what allow the H.E. side of the Service Company component to function. Without mechs, the equipment goes deadlined, we can't move gear around, and this creates major logistical problems all the way up to Battalion level. So if you like long hours, dirty work, leaving each day smelling like fuel, oil, grease and sweat, and knowing you put a hard day's work in, this is the job for you. This is especially true during the times where the unit is conducting FSMAO inspections on all the gear from each shop and the CG wants to come and look at gear and their record jackets.

    As you reach the Sgt rank, you are less hands on working with gear on the lot, and more hands on in the platoon office handling all manners of administrative paperwork. You trade in your coveralls, dolly, and tools for cammies, a desk chair, and a desktop computer. Nothing wrong with this, still important, and it's natural career progression. As I think of more things to add on I will. Any specific questions about 1341 MOS, ask, I'll answer.
    Thank you for the reply LCPL. Very detailed and insightful, that helps a ton.

    Any 1316s out there that could give a similar breakdown would be amazing.


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