Beirut 28th Observance
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  1. #1
    Phantom Blooper
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    Beirut 28th Observance

    Assistant commandant to speak at Beirut anniversary observance




    October 22, 2011 7:41 AM

    HOPE HODGE - DAILY NEWS STAFF

    For the 28th anniversary of the terrorist bombings in Beirut that killed more than 220 peacekeeping troops from Camp Lejeune’s 1st Battalion, 8th Marines, the fallen will be commemorated by a future generation from the same unit.
    Though 1/8 had been forward deployed for the last several anniversaries of the Beirut attacks, this year 28 troops from the unit will honor their fallen brothers-in-arms during the ceremony on Sunday at the Jacksonville Beirut memorial.
    Because of this, ceremony organizer Fernando Schiefelbein opted to make a few changes to the traditional memorial observance.
    “We decided, let’s lay three wreaths vice the traditional two,” he said. “The reason being, that we wanted 1/8 to lay a wreath for their Marines.”
    In keeping with tradition, Jacksonville Mayor Sammy Phillips and the event guest speaker will lay one wreath at the base of the memorial wall; Camp Lejeune and New River commanders Cols. Daniel Lecce and Jeffrey Hewlett will lay another; and this year, 1/8 commander Lt. Col. Kevin Trimble and unit senior enlisted Marine Sgt. Maj. Steven Rice will lay the third.
    The ceremony, which draws large crowds every year from around the country, will also have a special guest speaker this year: the assistant commandant of the Marine Corps, Gen. Joseph Dunford, who will be addressing the gathering at the memorial for the first time.
    “Gen. Dunford is very enthusiastic,” Schiefelbein said.
    On Friday morning, ceremony participants gathered at the memorial for a rehearsal of the ceremony, from the ushering of special guests and family members to their seats to the crisp march-on of the colors.
    Gunnery Sgt. Thomas Bain, company gunnery sergeant for Alpha Company, 1/ 8, said the Marines participating had all volunteered to be a part of the event.
    Even though many of the troops in the unit were not old enough to remember the grief and tragedy that surrounded Oct. 23, 1983, Bain said the history and significance of the events were taught to each new generation of troops.
    “Especially during this time of year we reiterate it with the Marines,” he said. “If you walk around the battalion command post you’ll see pictures of the past and actual pictures of the bombing itself. It’s very important for us to remember a significant event that took place within the battalion; you’re part of history and tradition.”
    Lance Cpl. Johnathan Dalton, an usher for the event, said he took his role seriously.
    “Anything dealing with the families is sensitive,” he said. “They had the ultimate sacrifice: They lost somebody in their family. They have to live with it every day.”
    Dalton said he volunteered to participate in the ceremony to give back to the community, as well as to honor his fallen brothers.
    “We do a lot of things in-country, but we don’t to a lot of things in-garrison to help out,” he said. “This will be something to help.”
    The official Beirut memorial ceremony will begin at 2 p.m. at the Jacksonville Memorial Gardens. A private candlelight vigil for the families of the fallen will be held at 6 a.m. at the memorial, and the Marine Corps League will conduct another ceremony aboard Camp Geiger at 4 p.m.
    In the event of inclement weather, the ceremony will take place in the Trinity United Methodist Church.

    Contact military reporter Hope Hodge at 910-219-8453 or hhodge@freedomenc.com.





  2. #2
    Mongoose
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    I ain't forgot you'll Chuck. You and your Marine brothers of the 1/8 have my Honor and respect.


  3. #3
    Marine Friend Free Member USNAviator's Avatar
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    I haven't forgotten either Chuck. The USS Kennedy and my squadron were rushed from air strikes off the coast to Libya to supporting our Marines in Beirut.

    May those brave men who gave all, rest in peace forever in Gods arms.



  4. #4
    Thank You Chuck You Will Be In My Thoughts And Prayers.
    Semper Fi And Godbless You My Brother

    Stephen Doc Hansen Hm3 Fmf


  5. #5

    Here's what I think !

    I never could figure this event out , as I think that someone did some bad planning that lead to this happening at Beirut , so many years ago . It's got to be the one time that the Corps seem or were forced to do nothing , but withdrawn !

    I'm glad that those Marines are not forgotten , seems their being there was real quickly not important , as I had just joined the Army National Guard and figured that there would be some hostile revenge . I was wrong , we ( those involved ) just pulled out and left after some debatable poor planning that allowed this to happen !

    Why were we there in the first place , without a good solid plan , if things went wrong ?

    Just my two cents about this !


  6. #6
    Phantom Blooper
    Guest Free Member
    Quote Originally Posted by Carpshooter View Post
    I never could figure this event out , as I think that someone did some bad planning that lead to this happening at Beirut , so many years ago . It's got to be the one time that the Corps seem or were forced to do nothing , but withdrawn !

    I'm glad that those Marines are not forgotten , seems their being there was real quickly not important , as I had just joined the Army National Guard and figured that there would be some hostile revenge . I was wrong , we ( those involved ) just pulled out and left after some debatable poor planning that allowed this to happen !

    Why were we there in the first place , without a good solid plan , if things went wrong ?

    Just my two cents about this !
    Today we remember....tomorrow I'll tell you my thoughts.


  7. #7
    Marine Free Member Bruce59's Avatar
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    to all those who haven't been to the Beirut Memorial and the park itself.
    Please go to http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ExEn4Ew8wmc
    Just behind the wall you will see a beam from 911 these two events are
    connected in history. And the newest part to the park, the glass Vietnam
    Wall. On a personel I've made this video a couple of years ago, and have been to many ceremonies, in 1961 and 1962 I was with 1/8 echo Co.
    so I feel a close connection.


  8. #8
    May We as Nation ever forget the sacrifices made by our fellow Marines on this dreadful day. Semper Fi My Brothers and may you forever Rest In Peace for you served your time in hell.


  9. #9
    Marine Family Free Member
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    Haven't forgotten Beirut, Phantom. Nor have I forgotten how you directed me to some of the best written material regarding that tragic day. All the best to you and to your fellow Marines.


  10. #10
    By your side Chuck,Semper Fidelis Brother.


  11. #11
    Semper Fi to the 1/8.


  12. #12
    Phantom Blooper
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    Community remembers those who came in peace

    HOPE HODGE - DAILY NEWS STAFF
    2011-10-23 17:29:28

    Sunday in Jacksonville dawned bright and clear, but the crowd gathered at the Beirut Memorial in the afternoon were somber as they remembered the Sunday 28 years ago that changed their lives forever.
    The anniversary of the terrorist bombing in Beirut, Lebanon on Oct. 23, 1983 that claimed the lives of 241 American peacekeeping troops, draws veterans and military family members to Jacksonville from across the country, a pilgrimage of remembrance.
    Chicago resident Randy Lund, former Marine with Camp Lejeune’s 1st Battalion, 8th Marines, said he would never forget being in Beirut at the time of the tragedy.
    “There’s like 55 guys on that wall that I knew personally, who aren’t here anymore,” he said. They did come in peace and they lost their lives for it. Nationally it should be known. It should never be forgotten.”
    Dwayne Hall, of Stephen City, Va., recalled standing guard around the rubble of the bombed barracks following the attack. He comes back every year, he said, out of honor for his fallen brothers.
    “To be with the guys,” he said. “We can never forget the brothers we left over there. This is actually bringing them back here.”
    At a brief and solemn memorial service presided over by city and Camp Lejeune officials, Beirut Memorial Advisory Board member Ronald Bower reminded the audience of how the community had taken action following the tragedy. Raising more than $270,000 of entirely private funds, the community would first build a living memorial — a row of Bradford Pear trees along Freedom Way in honor of the fallen — and then a granite wall inscribed with their names and the motto “They Came in Peace.”
    “The memorial that was erected entirely by private funds continues to stand as a memorial by the city of Jacksonville to the troops whose names are carved in stone,” Bower said.
    A special guest of honor, the Assistant Commandant of the Marine Corps, Gen. Joseph Dunford, recalled the names and stories of the fallen as he addressed the crowd: Capt. Michael Haskell. Sgt. Maj. Frederick Douglass, who served three tours in Vietnam and volunteered tirelessly for the Marine Corps Toys for Tots program. Sgt. Jeffrey Young. Lance Cpl. Johnny Copeland, who had just been promoted, and proudly asked his parents to address letters to him with his new rank.
    “We lost husbands, fathers, Little League coaches, and members of our church,” Dunford said. “We lost men who made a difference in our lives and in the world. We lost Marines who carried on the proud traditions of our Corps and unhesitatingly performed their duty.”
    In keeping with tradition, the ceremony concluded with the laying of wreaths in honor of the lost troops at the base of the memorial wall. But this year, the crowd stayed on at the memorial to see the dedication of a plaque in honor of Gold Star mothers — those who have lost a child in the service of his or her country.
    That was the event that brought Youngsville resident Patti Elliott to Jacksonville.
    Elliott’s son, Military Police Spc. Lucas Elliott, was killed in July while deployed to Iraq with his Army Reserve unit.
    “These people sacrificed their lives many, many years before (Lucas) even was born,” Elliott said. “I guess the best way to put it is, millions of Americans have sacrificed their lives over many conflicts. The story never changes, it’s just different faces.”
    Thought it was Eliott’s first time to participate in the Beirut Memorial observance, she said she felt a bond with the others who were gathered to remember.
    “I’ll never forget those who have sacrificed their lives and their families who are left behind,” she said. “Each person is somebody’s child, and as a Gold Star mother, that’s what it means to me.”
    Contact military reporter Hope Hodge at 910-219-8453 or hhodge@freedomenc.com.


  13. #13
    Mike Devlin, you are not forgotten.


  14. #14
    Never forgotten.


  15. #15
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    Thank You Chuck. You and All will be In My Thoughts and Prayers.
    We will never forget.

    Semper Fi,
    Rocky


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