Regarding a TS Security Clearance
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  1. #1

    Regarding a TS Security Clearance

    Hello Marines, I have a bit of a problem. I DEP'd in back in October of last year, and am set to ship in August. Pending I earn the title, I am going out for intelligence, however I am now questioning whether or not I will be able to get the clearance for the job. I have absolutely no criminal/drug history, but my recruiter told me to lie at MEPS about two past broken bones (pinky finger and wrist). I did so on the forms they gave me. So now I am extremely worried about being discharged in boot camp on a fraudulent enlistment.

    Should I talk to the SNOCIC of my RSS and somehow get back to MEPS and clear this up? I withheld my recruiter's information for obvious reasons. Thank you in advance.


  2. #2
    Medical/Mental/Criminal/Tattoo Waivers/Lying to MEPS...READ THIS FIRST


    LYING TO MEPS/YOUR RECRUITER/THE MARINE CORPS, REGARDING ANY OF THE ABOVE:

    Simply put....DON'T FREAKIN DO IT! Yes, there are Sea Lawyers floating around who'll tell you all sorts of stories about the Marines they know who lied about such and such or whatever. Know what? Those Marines are stupid to begin with....and playing with fire. The Corps can still, even after several years of service, decide to arbitrarily toss your azz into the street for false enlistment.

    Tell...the...truth.

    If you have to get a waiver....GET ONE.

    If you are disqualified, well, sorry. There is no 'right' to serve. Seek other career paths.

    http://www.leatherneck.com/forums/sh...ad.php?t=97158


  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by SoftballCatch23 View Post
    Tell...the...truth. If you have to get a waiver....GET ONE.

    If you are disqualified, well, sorry. There is no 'right' to serve. Seek other career paths.

    http://www.leatherneck.com/forums/sh...ad.php?t=97158

    I agree...lying about any enlistment criteria...IMO...immediately confirms that one does not qualify for anything in the USMC let alone a TS clearance.

    I had a TS clearance which was required for my final Marine Barracks duty station beginning in December 1967.
    The FBI and the ONI interviewed me prior to being approved.
    It's a very serious interviewing process and I'm sure the process has evolved since my experiences.

    Your integrity is paramount...do it right the first time.

    Good luck...


  4. #4
    I appreciate the replies Marines. I did not want to lie but again my recruiter insisted on it. I will be talking with the SNCOIC at my RSS this week to see what I can do about this. I've wanted to be a Marine for too long now to screw this up. Again thank you and thank you for your service.


  5. #5
    Marine Friend Free Member USNAviator's Avatar
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    In order to get a Top Secret Security Clearance you have to undergo a Single Scope Background Investigation which will encompass the following:

    • Minimum investigative scope. Past ten (10) years or to age 18, whichever is less.
    • Expansion of Investigation. The investigation may be expanded as necessary, to resolve issues and/or address employment standards unique to individual agencies.
    • National Agency Check. Checks on subject and spouse/cohabitant of investigative and criminal history files of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, including submission of fingerprint records on the subject, and such other national agencies (DCII, INS, OPM, CIA, etc.) as appropriate to the individual's background.
    • Subject Interview. Required in all cases and shall be conducted by trained security, investigative, or counterintelligence personnel to ensure full investigative coverage. An additional personal interview shall be conducted when necessary to resolve any significant information and/or inconsistencies developed during the investigation. In departments or agencies with policies sanctioning the use of the polygraph for personnel security purposes, the personal interview may include a polygraph examination, conducted by a qualified polygraph examiner.
    • Birth. Independent certification of date and place of birth received directly from appropriate registration authority.
    • Citizenship. Subject must be a U.S. citizen. Independent verification of citizenship received directly from appropriate registration authority. For foreign-born immediate family members, verification of citizenship or legal status is also required.
    • Education. Independent verification of most recent or most significant claimed attendance and/or degree/diploma within the scope of investigation. If all education is outside of the investigative scope, the last education above high school level will be verified.
    • Employment. Direct verification through records of all periods of employment within scope but in any event the most recent two (2) years. Personal interviews of two sources (supervisor/coworkers) for each employment of six months or more shall be attempted. In the event that no employment exceeds six months, interviews of supervisor/coworkers shall be attempted. All periods of unemployment in excess of sixty (60) days shall be verified through records and/or sources. All prior federal/military service and type of discharges shall be verified.
    • References. Four required (at least two of which are developed). To the extent practical, all should have social knowledge of subject and collectively span the entire scope of the investigation. As appropriate, additional interviews may include cohabitant(s), ex-spouses, and relative(s). Interviews with psychological/medical personnel are to be accomplished as required to resolve issues.
    • Neighborhood. Interviews with neighbors for last three years if residence exceeds six months. Confirmation of current residence shall be accomplished regardless of length, including review of rental records if necessary. In the event no residence exceeds six months, interview of neighbors should be undertaken.
    • Credit. Verification of the subject's financial status and credit habits of all locations where subject has resided, been employed, or attended school for six months or more for the last seven (7) years.
    • Local Agency Checks. A check of appropriate Police records covering all locations where subject has resided, been employed, or attended school for six months or more during the scope of investigation, including current residence regardless of duration. In the event that no residence, employment, or education exceeds six months, local agency checks should be performed.
    • Public Records. Verification of divorce(s), bankruptcy, etc., and any other court (civil or criminal) actions to which subject has been or is a party within the scope of investigation, when known or developed.
    • Transferability. Investigations satisfying the scope and standards specified above are transferable between agencies and shall be deemed to meet the investigative standards for access to collateral Top Secret/National Security Information and Sensitive Compartmented Information. No further investigation or reinvestigation prior to revalidation every five years will be undertaken unless the agency has substantial information indicating that the transferring individual may not satisfy eligibility standards for clearance or the agency head determines in writing that to accept the investigation would not be in the national security interest of the United States.
      • Just a note, this is not necessarily a true statement about the transferability. If you hold a TS/SCI Clearance with the Department of Defense, it will not transfer to Departement of Justice; DOJ will redo an entire investigation.
    • Notes. Immediate family—spouse, parents, brothers, sisters, children, and cohabitant of the individual requiring access are tested.



  6. #6
    Plain and simple................DO NOT LIE!!!
    Regardless of your recruiter suggesting you to lie, it's your future that you'll be messing with, not your recruiters.


  7. #7
    USNAviator.......there's some good info to chew on.

    When I got my TS I recall being informed how expensive the BI was to do on someone.
    I think there was still one above mine.
    IIRC they may have called it a 'Crypo'(?) or something like that.
    I might need to be corrected on that thought.


  8. #8
    Marine Friend Free Member USNAviator's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chulaivet1966 View Post
    USNAviator.......there's some good info to chew on.

    When I got my TS I recall being informed how expensive the BI was to do on someone.
    I think there was still one above mine.
    IIRC they may have called it a 'Crypo'(?) or something like that.
    I might need to be corrected on that thought.
    Wayne the Dept of Energy has C,L,and Q clearance. And if you're going to be working anywhere near the President, you're going to be subject to Yankee White investigation

    Also something called SSIR, Secret Service Information Restricted or "So secret it's ridiculous"


  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by USNAviator View Post
    Wayne the Dept of Energy has C,L,and Q clearance. And if you're going to be working anywhere near the President, you're going to be subject to Yankee White investigation

    Also something called SSIR, Secret Service Information Restricted or "So secret it's ridiculous"
    Mine was referred to as 'TS' which had a particular color designator on the badge itself.
    Of course, I've never heard of the 'YWI'.
    It has such an *invasive* sound to me.
    Maybe the OP would like to know if there's any orifice probing or other physiological requirements.

    I like the alternative acronym by the way.
    Time for more coffee...


  10. #10
    Yup.

    SSBI (Single Scope Background Investigation) takes about 18 months to complete. And while the minor broken bones issue would have been taken care of with a waiver, lying about it to enlist becomes a more serious offense.

    See if you can get it cleared up prior to leaving.


  11. #11
    Actually, SSBI's are only taking about six months to complete now...SBPR's are only taking about 60 days.


  12. #12
    No kidding? Good deal. That's great! Glad to see that backlog was fixed. In 2001 my SSBI took almost 18 months...was actually OUT of the Corps when it came through LOL


  13. #13
    Yeah, back in 2005, my boss who was a GM-15 with a previous SSBI, took two years to complete his periodic reinvestigation. After congress got involved, OPM started contracting with USIS to conduct the background investigations and DONCAF received funding to hire additional adjudicators. My last SBPR in 2007 only took 45 days.


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