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View Full Version : Is it normal to have second thoughts?



usmchopefull
03-28-10, 10:46 PM
Posted this earlier in the wrong board, so I'm posting it here now which I believe to be the correct one.

I've wanted to be in the marine corps since 6th grade, but now that I'm almost finished with high school and am close to the actually joining up, I'm having some doubt. Basically I'm questioning myself whether I have what it takes to be part of the few and the proud. I find myself asking questions like: What if I die? (I want to be part of an infantry MOS). What if my entire life so far amounts to being shot by some flintstone with an AK? I know I would be serving my country, but there's still that kind of feeling. How could I leave my parents and all I love behind? By having to ask this question have I, in fact, answered my own question?? I'm also kind of nervous asking this question on this site which is, for the most part, people who are part of the few and the proud. I'm hoping I've come to the right place.

Anyway, is it normal to question yourself or have doubt before joining? Did you?

Lisa 23
03-28-10, 10:56 PM
For starters, you can fill out all of your profile so the Marines who are going to answer your questions, know who they are talking to. :thumbup: You may also want to familiarize yourself with the site rules in the poolee and Ask A Marine forums too.
And when using the word Marine Corps, it will be capitalized at all times.

usmchopefull
03-28-10, 11:32 PM
I have filled out my profile and have read the rules. I apologize for disobeying the rules acting so ignorant. If there was a way to edit my post to capitalize Marine Corps I would. Now, would it be possible for someone to answer my question?

echo3oscar1833
03-28-10, 11:35 PM
Dude they answered your question in the other thread, that you posted.

echo3oscar1833
03-28-10, 11:36 PM
Read the replies just don't respond to that thread, where not going to go through an double post everything that was said in the other thread.

echo3oscar1833
03-28-10, 11:38 PM
My bad I see they deleted the other thread did you get a chance to read it?

echo3oscar1833
03-28-10, 11:39 PM
And he leaves:(

usmchopefull
03-28-10, 11:55 PM
I'm still here! And no I didn't get any chance. So, I would be very happy if someone could answer my question.

echo3oscar1833
03-28-10, 11:59 PM
Aight so check it out kid, the Marine Corps is tough, bad things happen. But let me tell you something as a Marine you have to be willing to pay the ultimate sacrifice for the Marine Corps, Country, and Family. If you can't accept that you need to look for a different Career path. Granted I have never been in combat, but you can bet your azz if I had to give up my life for my fellow Marines I would do it in a heart beat. Semper Fi:beer:

usmchopefull
03-29-10, 12:11 AM
Alright thanks for the reply. I will take those thoughts into consideration when I make my final decision.

ameriken
03-29-10, 12:26 AM
Personally, I never had any second thoughts at all. When I joined I was totally motivated and was fully determined that I would make it.

From the sound of your post, you've already bailed. You dont want to go to boot camp with doubts. If you're having those doubts now, then back off and give it up. Once the pressure is off yourself then you'll have more time to really think about it more clearly.

My guess is you'll come to one of two conclusions: one, you're really glad you didn't go and you know that you made the right decision to not join and you'll never think about it again; or two, you'll find that the desire to be a Marine didn't go away, it is still there gnawing at you, and you'll eventually deal with your doubts and join with all your heart, mind, and soul.

kaboom1371
03-29-10, 03:26 AM
if your already thinking about dying this might not be for you.. If you worry about dying for yourself, How could you give your life for someone else to live?

Moderboater
03-29-10, 04:42 AM
Kid, the results of dying are real. I never deployed, however when I was in I had quite a few of my buddies I knew and had good times with get killed. It's not modern warfare 2, there isn't any second chances. Btw if you to decide to go infantry, your really going to hate life till your first combat deployment.

Moder

micarr57
03-29-10, 11:45 PM
i had second thoughts the night before i left for boot and for the next twodays after thatwas committed then best decision i have made in my life

advanced
03-30-10, 09:49 AM
I had doubts every morning at PI when I awoke to the sh_t cans being thrown through the squad bay and the DI's yelling "Get UP, Get Up" and as I stood there on line with the others I'd wonder what did I do to get here. And one morning I realized I'm becoming a Marine.

I had doubts at night when we stood on line and in union we would all say "Ours is not to Reason Why, Ours is but to do or Die." And as the nights went by I realized I began to mean it, and the doubts went away.

I had doubts in the Nam when so many of my buds were wasted, or got messed up real bad, or they died in my arms. I had doubts when we were told we were going back into Happy Valley (one of the many real bad places), whether I would make it out this time. But every time I had those doubts, which didn't happen very often, a voice in my head would say Who Better to go, ain't so bad, never quit, and our Batt. moto "Get Some."

Marines sometimes have doubts, you'd be crazy if you didn't. But Marines have honor, death before dishonor.

And then something happens. At An Hoa, I remember drinking at night sometimes with my buds and someone would ask "How can they keep sending the few of us in, over and over and expect us to keep coming out. Can even the best of the best keep coming out?" Regardless of what we said to each other deep inside we all knew that we couldn't. I and the others were OK with that. We called it "Giving up our Lives." When that time came let it be said "In the highest tradition of the Marine Corps."

And then one day you realize that somehow you have somehow survived, you're going home, back to the world. I realized that I was going to leave the only world up to that time that I really understood. Now, that's scary.

Since then I have learned that fear is simply a lack of reference (experience). My experiences in the Marine Corps filled me with so many references of life and death and gave me a wonderful knowledge of what I was capable of (and not all of it is nice).

Marines make a difference. There are a few Marines alive today because of me, and if even for awhile there were Marines that lived a little longer because of me. Not bragging, a fact. I myself am alive because of other Marines.

Many feel the fear, Marines go through the fear.

Young man, you are eaten up with the fear. This door before you is a major life decision point for you. Do you open the door to your life.

There's an old Marine Corps saying. "From the Outside you cannot understand it, and from the Inside I cannot explain it to you."

tdrt
03-30-10, 10:09 AM
Too bad they deleted the other thread. I had a brilliant response.

Phantom Blooper
03-30-10, 10:29 AM
It's not the fear....it's what you do with the fear.

Men and women joining the Marines are excited for the new venture in the life that they will begin......

Fear can always be reversed and turned into gallantry....bravery...courage and valor.

In the face of war...if you are not fearful....then there is a problem....

But to be fearful of joining the Marines is nothing to fear....hundreds upon thousands have faced the demons of the Marines and have marched to victory.

Fear is temporary. Regret is forever.
Choose.

:evilgrin:

polizei
03-30-10, 12:03 PM
I had doubts every morning at PI when I awoke to the sh_t cans being thrown through the squad bay and the DI's yelling "Get UP, Get Up" and as I stood there on line with the others I'd wonder what did I do to get here. And one morning I realized I'm becoming a Marine.

I had doubts at night when we stood on line and in union we would all say "Ours is not to Reason Why, Ours is but to do or Die." And as the nights went by I realized I began to mean it, and the doubts went away.

I had doubts in the Nam when so many of my buds were wasted, or got messed up real bad, or they died in my arms. I had doubts when we were told we were going back into Happy Valley (one of the many real bad places), whether I would make it out this time. But every time I had those doubts, which didn't happen very often, a voice in my head would say Who Better to go, ain't so bad, never quit, and our Batt. moto "Get Some."

Marines sometimes have doubts, you'd be crazy if you didn't. But Marines have honor, death before dishonor.

And then something happens. At An Hoa, I remember drinking at night sometimes with my buds and someone would ask "How can they keep sending the few of us in, over and over and expect us to keep coming out. Can even the best of the best keep coming out?" Regardless of what we said to each other deep inside we all knew that we couldn't. I and the others were OK with that. We called it "Giving up our Lives." When that time came let it be said "In the highest tradition of the Marine Corps."

And then one day you realize that somehow you have somehow survived, you're going home, back to the world. I realized that I was going to leave the only world up to that time that I really understood. Now, that's scary.

Since then I have learned that fear is simply a lack of reference (experience). My experiences in the Marine Corps filled me with so many references of life and death and gave me a wonderful knowledge of what I was capable of (and not all of it is nice).

Marines make a difference. There are a few Marines alive today because of me, and if even for awhile there were Marines that lived a little longer because of me. Not bragging, a fact. I myself am alive because of other Marines.

Many feel the fear, Marines go through the fear.

Young man, you are eaten up with the fear. This door before you is a major life decision point for you. Do you open the door to your life.

There's an old Marine Corps saying. "From the Outside you cannot understand it, and from the Inside I cannot explain it to you."

That's a damn good post. Listen to this. :evilgrin:

spotts
03-30-10, 03:29 PM
Advanced just gave you some solid advice young man. I hope you make the decision thats right in your heart. You either have what it takes to become on of The few or you dont. Only you can make that decision.

tdrt
03-30-10, 04:13 PM
It's normal to have second thoughts about any life-changing event. But you can't focus on what could go wrong or death. Hell, you could get hit by a bus tomorrow.

ameriken
03-31-10, 04:24 PM
It's normal to have second thoughts about any life-changing event. But you can't focus on what could go wrong or death. Hell, you could get hit by a bus tomorrow.
Are you suggesting he goes home via Amtrak and not Greyhound? :nerd:

echo3oscar1833
03-31-10, 04:35 PM
Are you suggesting he goes home via Amtrak and not Greyhound? :nerd:

He should take a cab :bunny:

tdrt
03-31-10, 04:37 PM
Train derails, cab crashes or gets carjacked....