PDA

View Full Version : A few questions regarding antidepressants



USMChopeful1178
02-27-10, 01:41 PM
Recently my mom decided to put me on some kind of antidepressant cause she thinks I'm depressed (which isn't the case) and I'm going to get off of them as soon as her and my doctor realize that they are doing nothing for me. At first I was very upset because I knew I would be DQ'ed for a year after taking them but it might be nice because I will get a chance to lose some weight and get into shape before I try to become a Marine.

Anyways, I know that I'm DQ'ed from the Marines for one year after I stop taking antidepressants but after that year will I have to get a waiver saying I've been off them for a year and I'm fine or can I just go in as if I had never taken them. Also, if I do have to get a waiver for the antidepressants will it be hard to get or will it be automatically approved as long as I have been off them for a year and haven't had any problems with depression.

I also have another question about a medication I have been taken for as long as I can remember. It's called fluvoxamine and it's an SSRI which are sometimes prescribed for depression. I had mine prescribed in order to deal with my OCD and the medication is NOT depression-related but I know for some people it is. So I'm wondering, will I be able to continue taking fluvoxamine even into my service or will I have to get off of them?

Rocky C
02-27-10, 02:45 PM
If you have OCD, you can not Enlist.

Sorry.

Good Health to You,

Rocky

USMChopeful1178
02-27-10, 03:03 PM
If you have OCD, you can not Enlist.

Sorry.

Good Health to You,

Rocky
Thank you Marine however I find it hard to believe that things are so set in stone. I'm not disagreeing with you but if I get off of the medication for a year would I then be able to enlist?

Rocky C
02-27-10, 03:20 PM
Thank you Marine however I find it hard to believe that things are so set in stone. I'm not disagreeing with you but if I get off of the medication for a year would I then be able to enlist?


Mood Disorders

Current mood disorders including, but not limited to, major depression (296.23), bipolar (296.47), affective psychoses (296.89), depressive not otherwise specified (311), are disqualifying.

History of mood disorders requiring outpatient care for longer than 6 months by a physician or other mental health professional (V65.40), or inpatient treatment in a hospital or residential facility is disqualifying.

History of symptoms consistent with a mood disorder of a repeated nature that impairs school, social, or work efficiency is disqualifying.
Current or history of adjustment disorders (309) within the previous 3 months is disqualifying.

Behavioral Disorders

Current or history of conduct (312), or behavior (313) disorders is disqualifying. Recurrent encounters with law enforcement agencies, antisocial attitudes or behaviors are tangible evidence of impaired capacity to adapt to military service and as such are disqualifying.

Current or history of personality disorder (301) is disqualifying. History (demonstrated by repeated inability to maintain reasonable adjustment in school, with employers or fellow workers, or other social groups), interview, or psychological testing revealing that the degree of immaturity, instability, personality inadequacy, impulsiveness, or dependency will likely interfere with adjustment in the Armed Forces is disqualifying.

Current or history of other behavior disorders is disqualifying, including, but not limited to conditions such as the following:

(1) Enuresis (307.6) or encopresis (307.7) after 13th birthday is disqualifying.

(2) Sleepwalking (307.4) after 13th birthday is disqualifying.

(3) Eating disorders (307.5), anorexia nervosa (307.1), bulimia (307.51), or unspecified disorders of eating (307.59) lasting longer than 3 months and occurring after 13th birthday are disqualifying.
Any current receptive or expressive language disorder, including, but not limited to any speech impediment, stammering and stuttering (307.0) of such a degree as to significantly interfere with production of speech or to repeat commands, is disqualifying.

History of suicidal behavior, including gesture(s) or attempt (s) (300.9) , or history of self-mutilation, is disqualifying.

Current or history of anxiety disorders (anxiety (300.01) or panic (300.2)), agoraphobia (300.21), social phobia (300.23), simple phobias (300.29), (obsessive-compulsive) (300.3), other acute reactions to stress (308), and posttraumatic stress disorder (309.81) are disqualifying.

Current or history of dissociative disorders, including, but not limited to hysteria (300.1), depersonalization (300.6), and other (300.8), are disqualifying.

Current or history of somatoform disorders, including, but not limited to hypochondriasis (300.7) or chronic pain disorder, are disqualifying.

Current or history of psychosexual conditions (302), including, but not limited to transsexualism, exhibitionism, transvestism, voyeurism, and other paraphilias, are disqualifying.

Current or history of alcohol dependence (303), drug dependence (304), alcohol abuse (305), or other drug abuse (305.2 thru 305.9) is disqualifying.

Current or history of other mental disorders (all 290319 not listed above) that in the opinion of the civilian or military provider will interfere with, or prevent satisfactory performance of military duty, are disqualifying.

Derived from Department of Defense (DOD) Directive 6130.3, "Physical Standards for Appointment, Enlistment, and Induction," and DOD Instruction 6130.4, "Criteria and Procedure Requirements for Physical Standards for Appointment, Enlistment, or Induction in the Armed Forces."

Lisa 23
02-27-10, 03:45 PM
Just the fact that you are using the name "John Doe", which isn't your real name, in my opinion, is giving me the impression that you do have some sort of problem. I know some people on here don't like giving out a lot of personal info, but how about a real first name at least, and how old are you anyway?
The name "John Doe" is a bit over the top, don't you think?

Old Marine
02-27-10, 05:56 PM
If you want an answer to your problem, go see a Recruiter. He should have the answer for you. When you are on the internet, you have no idea what Sea Lawyer you are talking to.

USMChopeful1178
03-01-10, 09:44 PM
Just the fact that you are using the name "John Doe", which isn't your real name, in my opinion, is giving me the impression that you do have some sort of problem. I know some people on here don't like giving out a lot of personal info, but how about a real first name at least, and how old are you anyway?
The name "John Doe" is a bit over the top, don't you think?
Ya, it's not my real name and I kinda don't want to give out my full name but I guess I could at least give my first name, that isn't revealing too much. I don't have any sort of problems in regards to the name "John Doe" I just put it there because it's what people use in legal cases when someone wishes to be unidentified, nothing to do with my mental state!

By the way, I'm 17 I thought I put my birthday on the profile but I will check after I post this and correct it is necessary.

And thank you for your answer as well Old Marine, I can get as much information on the internet as possible but nothing in the USMC is set in stone and I think that you're right in me going to see a recruiter.

Sgt Leprechaun
03-02-10, 12:43 AM
This one is SET IN STONE. If you are on various and sundry anti-depressants....you are DQ'd. If you've been diagnosed with depression....you are DQ'd. Period.

And quite frankly, unless you are some sort of celebrity, nobody really cares who you are, except when you try and FAKE a name. Then it raises questions about what you are hiding and why, esp. since it's kinda dumb to do it.

Go see the Recruiter and hear it from them, but I'm telling you straight, you'll be DQ'd. Sorry, but that's just the way it is.

Lisa 23
03-02-10, 12:54 PM
You want to keep trying for that waiver you need for being on anti-depressants, go right ahead...that's your choice to do so, but don't come back here and say that you are pi$$ed or whatever else because your waiver wasn't approved. Basically...don't say we didn't tell you so.
Right now, the Marine Corps is beyond its quota and can be very selective these days on who can join. If they had their choice to take you over those who want to join and don't need any waivers for anything...guess who they are going to take?
As it's been said before by another Marine, FattyTheFerret, in one of your other threads....

I don't think you're listening. A waiver is unlikely because a recruiter will have no reason to spend time filling out the additional paperwork for you when there are ten other kids that have perfectly clean records ready to sign up.

The question isn't whether or not your waiver will be approved but whether or not anyone's going to bother submitting it in the first place. If that even happens, then you have to worry about it getting approved not because you're being compared to someone else looking for a waiver but because you're being compared to a dozen other applicants that don't need waivers.

Lisa 23
03-02-10, 01:08 PM
Ya, it's not my real name and I kinda don't want to give out my full name but I guess I could at least give my first name, that isn't revealing too much. I don't have any sort of problems in regards to the name "John Doe" I just put it there because it's what people use in legal cases when someone wishes to be unidentified, nothing to do with my mental state!

You do know that John Doe is also used to indentify a deceased male who can't be indentified, don't you?
This isn't a court room that involves legal cases....and I, for one, don't like when a wannabe has to use a "fake" name on a Marine Corps website, and then wants to join the Marines.
I am in no way making fun of you, nor am I a doctor, but you sound like you may have a bit of a personality problem going on there. Maybe your mom was right in having you see a doctor to put you on medication. You may not be able to see the problem you have, but others can.
Here's some advice, take care of the problem you have with you being on medication. After you are off of them for the year or whatever time frame it is, then go and see a recruiter. Maybe at that time, waivers may be a bit easier to come by.
Good luck to you.

Lisa 23
03-02-10, 01:57 PM
How long have you been taking the meds you're currently taking now? And just because this medication isn't working for you as you say they aren't, doesn't mean that your doctor can't prescribe a different one for you, one that will work. Sometimes you have to try a couple different ones for one to actually work the way it should, or take one in combination with another.
So....don't say it's working, when it's actually not. You're not doing yourself any good by saying that.
You're only 17. The Marine Corps isn't going anywhere and you have plenty of time to get yourself better if you want to join the Marines.

USMChopeful1178
03-04-10, 08:05 PM
How long have you been taking the meds you're currently taking now? And just because this medication isn't working for you as you say they aren't, doesn't mean that your doctor can't prescribe a different one for you, one that will work. Sometimes you have to try a couple different ones for one to actually work the way it should, or take one in combination with another.
So....don't say it's working, when it's actually not. You're not doing yourself any good by saying that.
You're only 17. The Marine Corps isn't going anywhere and you have plenty of time to get yourself better if you want to join the Marines.
First off I would like to say that I greatly appreciate ALL answers and especially WMarine here who goes out of her way so much to help me. Sorry about the whole name thing, I'd prefer to keep my last name private but my first name is Max if you need to know.

Anyways, I think that the antidepressants ARE working but too well. It's almost as if I'm on some sort of high, like I'm happy all the time and don't have any worries. Seems nice but I need stress in my life to keep me focused and I didn't have a huge problem before taking them.

Someone mentioned earlier in this thread how hard waivers are to come by today. I'm going to put 110% into getting these waivers while taking in all the words you Marines have to offer. Don't worry, if my waivers aren't approved I'm not gonna come on here to vent my anger, I realize that the odds are against me but I'm going to try all the same.

I get what you're saying about me "only being 17". I guess I was kinda hoping to go straight from high school to the military, it just seems like a common thing for me and that most people there would be 18 or 19. I try not to be in a hurry to grow up but I see your point in that the Marines aren't going anywhere, still I want to enlist as soon as possible but I agree on taking the time to get off ALL medications and lead a "normal life".

To answer your question, this is like the second or third week I have been on these antidepressants but I have been on an SSRI (Fluvoxamine) for years now. I'm still gonna have to talk to a recruiter but hopefully if I can get off these medications for a reasonable amount of time I will be able to join.

Lisa 23
03-04-10, 08:11 PM
If you feel like you're on a 'high' all the time, let your doctor know. It could be a side effect of the medication, which aren't to be taken lightly. Your doctor will have to adjust your meds, maybe a lower dose.
As for the OCD meds you're on, not sure about that, but be sure to disclose ALL medications being taken to a recruiter when you speak to him/her.
Good luck to you.

USMChopeful1178
03-04-10, 08:24 PM
Thanks, I'll make sure to let my doctor know about the "high". The OCD meds I already take have antidepressant qualities and I think combining them with the antidepressants is giving me a bit too much serotonin, but you're right I'll have to talk to a professional.

I'll make sure to tell a recruiter about both of these meds and the possibility for a waiver if I am off of them. I know that there are no guarantees in the USMC but I can still try!

Thank you very much for helping me, I'm sure that this won't be the last time you do so but it's truly encouraging to to know that there are people who care about others hopes and dreams and are willing to help. This is one of the many reasons I look up to the Marines and aspire to be one of them.

Lisa 23
03-04-10, 08:30 PM
You're Welcome! :thumbup: