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thedrifter
06-14-03, 10:03 AM
San Diego judge orders former Somali military judge deported


By Seth Hettena
ASSOCIATED PRESS
4:29 p.m., June 13, 2003

SAN DIEGO A former Somali military judge accused of war crimes has been ordered deported from the United States, immigration officials said Friday.

Abdi Ali Nur Mohamed, known as Judge Nur, allegedly participated in the execution of innocent civilians in Hargeisa, Somalia, during the rule of dictator Mohamed Siad Barre, according to the Bureau of Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

The order Thursday by U.S. Immigration Judge Ignacio P. Fernandez-Valdez marked the first time that an alleged Somali war criminal had been ordered deported, the bureau said in a statement.

Mohamed, who did not contest the deportation order, remains in federal custody in San Diego, said Lauren Mack, a spokeswoman for the Bureau of Immigration. She declined to provide any further details on the case.

His attorney, Dario Aguirre, declined to comment.

Mohamed had been living since June 1990 the United States, where he was seeking asylum, according to the Department of Homeland Security.

A federal judge in Seattle barred U.S. immigration officials in February from conducting removals to Somalia, finding that deported individuals could be seriously harmed if they were returned to the war-torn nation.

In San Diego, immigration officials will seek to deport Mohamed to another country, according to the Department of Homeland Security.

In the late 1980s, Somali government forces led by Siad Barre summarily executed as many as 1,000 people, many of them unarmed civilians, in and around the northwestern Somali town of Hargeisa, according to an Amnesty International, the London-based human rights group. Siad Barre was ousted from power in January 1991.

Agents with Immigration and Customs Enforcement, or ICE, conducted an in-depth investigation both at home and abroad into Mohamed's alleged role in the atrocities.

"This investigation demonstrates that ICE and the Department of Homeland Security will not allow this country to be a safe haven for human rights abusers," Michael J. Garcia, acting assistant secretary of Immigrations and Customs Enforcement, said in a statement.

Garcia noted that the agency is handling more than 200 cases involving alleged human rights abusers from more than 50 different countries.

Sempers,

Roger

http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/military/20030613-1629-ca-us-somalia-deportation.html

Kalbo
06-16-03, 04:43 AM
A federal judge in Seattle barred U.S. immigration officials in February from conducting removals to Somalia, finding that deported individuals could be seriously harmed if they were returned to the war-torn nation.

Yeah, I guess summarily executing as many as 1,000 people could be hazardous to your health. We actually pay this judge's salary?

SF Bill