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cosmicdingo
03-03-08, 11:55 AM
In your opinion, how many of these boot camp thumping stories are for real,i.e "got four teeth knocked out", "got knocked unconcious", "got punched in the gut" , etc etc.? :confused:

Camper51
03-03-08, 12:06 PM
As we all well know thumping was not, and is not, allowed in boot camp.

Are these stories true?

I have no idea, but I do know that some how I managed to lose a fight with the butt of an M-14 stock to my chest when my senior drill instructor overheard me say something about him. I think I was being instructed on something or another at the time...

I also seem to remember that a recruit from another platoon was taken away wearing a straight jacket, seems some rubber hoses had met him and started a fight...

Duke1970
03-03-08, 12:45 PM
Well I know that I received 'personal' instruction on why you should not call a drill instructor by his last name only. It did take me a little time to get myself together afterwards. :)

MarineNCO
03-03-08, 01:09 PM
I went through Boot Camp at Parris Island in 2002. I do not recall ever seeing my Drill Instructors lay a hand on a recruit in a harmful manner (i.e. with the full intent to cause harm to the individual) or ever actually harm a recruit at all to be honest. I hear all the time about "My Drill Instructor did this and that and the other". I wonder if these people are/were so afraid of their DI that they didn't report the supposed abuse. A DI can be held accountable for their actions up to two years after a tour on the drill field. All it takes is one person mouthing off and making allegations to ruin a promising career. I like to think the Drill Instructors are proffessional and interested in making Marines.

I know my Drill Instructors were top notch Marines and proffessional in all their actions.

To Former Drill Instructors SSgt Richardt and SSgt Miller Platoon 3106, wherever you are Semper Fi !!

outlaw3179
03-03-08, 01:18 PM
One arms distance recruit...Its for your safety.

MarineNCO
03-03-08, 01:30 PM
One arms distance recruit...Its for your safety.

I liked the original post: Its for your safety and mine. Hehe...I remember hearing that, never seen it put into play.

I tell my Marines that the injury radius on a Marine Sgt is 72 inches. Stay out of my personal space and I won't have to send you to BAS. For some reason they don't believe me.

Isrowei
03-03-08, 02:09 PM
...many of these ... stories ...

For the most part, that's exactly what they are. Stories. I'm not sure why you're interested in them either. It's like saying we've all heard that rednecks keep tires in the their front yard... how many of you think it's true?

The fact is that the sheer number of stories you hear are highly overated (and usually passed from one person to the next... remember the game "telephone"?). The true ones are almost never the highly touted sensationalized versions that catch attention and fire the imagination. Perhaps you could relate them to fishermen's stories. Very few fishermen come back from the lake with absolutely amazing whoppers. A few have heard of their friend's whoppers. Even more have heard of "once upon a time there was a whopper" and usually the best whopper stories are the old guys sitting around swapping tales trying to outdo the other ones on who has the biggest baddest whopper story. No offense to the older guys, but science has taught us that with time, truth is often indistinguashable from imagination.

Drill Instructors now, like all Drill Instructors before, are held to the highest standards of personal discipline. They are some of the most dedicated Marines you'll ever meet. They love the Corps wholeheartedly and know how to follow orders. Sure, from time to time (usually a lot longer time involved than the average Marine), one may do something foolish and get in trouble. But it is rarely to the level that the stories would have you believe. Check the courts martial records if you think I'm misrepresenting. They're part of public records and open to a FOIA request.

I hope this puts an end to this thread. Furtherance of these stereotypes does a disservice to our Corps and the multitude of outstanding Marines on the Drill Field who are doing the right thing, day in and day out, year after year.

semperfi170
03-03-08, 02:33 PM
In your opinion, how many of these boot camp thumping stories are for real,i.e "got four teeth knocked out", "got knocked unconcious", "got punched in the gut" , etc etc.? :confused:


Please fill out your profile!

I agree with the LT, most are sea stories. Times do change and prior to 1975 it was probably more likely to have happened.

Accord
03-03-08, 03:20 PM
For the most part, that's exactly what they are. Stories. I'm not sure why you're interested in them either. It's like saying we've all heard that rednecks keep tires in the their front yard... how many of you think it's true?

The fact is that the sheer number of stories you hear are highly overated (and usually passed from one person to the next... remember the game "telephone"?). The true ones are almost never the highly touted sensationalized versions that catch attention and fire the imagination. Perhaps you could relate them to fishermen's stories. Very few fishermen come back from the lake with absolutely amazing whoppers. A few have heard of their friend's whoppers. Even more have heard of "once upon a time there was a whopper" and usually the best whopper stories are the old guys sitting around swapping tales trying to outdo the other ones on who has the biggest baddest whopper story. No offense to the older guys, but science has taught us that with time, truth is often indistinguashable from imagination.

Drill Instructors now, like all Drill Instructors before, are held to the highest standards of personal discipline. They are some of the most dedicated Marines you'll ever meet. They love the Corps wholeheartedly and know how to follow orders. Sure, from time to time (usually a lot longer time involved than the average Marine), one may do something foolish and get in trouble. But it is rarely to the level that the stories would have you believe. Check the courts martial records if you think I'm misrepresenting. They're part of public records and open to a FOIA request.

I hope this puts an end to this thread. Furtherance of these stereotypes does a disservice to our Corps and the multitude of outstanding Marines on the Drill Field who are doing the right thing, day in and day out, year after year.
With all due respect sir, when brass comes on deck or is anywhere close to training areas, boot camp is a completely different place and I will leave it at that.

I'll just simply say that boot camp today is no different than it was back in the 40's, 50's, and 60's in certain aspects - merely DI's are just not as open or obvious about it. All of the DI's who have gotten courtmartialed, NJP'ed, etc. did not do anything out of the ordinary (or anything wrong either IMO), they simply got caught.

Marine Corps boot camp has the reputation that it does for a reason, and it's definitely not because of the confidence course or pool week. If every DI played by the rules and followed the book to the T, we'd all be a bunch of pussies.

Big Jim
03-03-08, 03:39 PM
Well I know that I received 'personal' instruction on why you should not call a drill instructor by his last name only. It did take me a little time to get myself together afterwards. :)

I remember that period of TMI, (technical military instruction), one of our DI's gave me and a few other recruits because someone, not me, whistled at him, he was relieved of his duties for it. We didn't bleed...much, well, I didn't anyway. But, I didn't see anything! That's my story and I'm stickin to it!!

greensideout
03-03-08, 03:39 PM
With all due respect sir, when brass comes on deck or is anywhere close to training areas, boot camp is a completely different place and I will leave it at that.

I'll just simply say that boot camp today is no different than it was back in the 40's, 50's, and 60's in certain aspects - merely DI's are just not as open or obvious about it. All of the DI's who have gotten courtmartialed, NJP'ed, etc. did not do anything out of the ordinary (or anything wrong either IMO), they simply got caught.

Marine Corps boot camp has the reputation that it does for a reason, and it's definitely not because of the confidence course or pool week. If every DI played by the rules and followed the book to the T, we'd all be a bunch of pussies.


:thumbup:

Sgt Leprechaun
03-03-08, 03:44 PM
Never saw any thumping, ever. Saw plenty of modifications to attitude, though.

Duke1970
03-03-08, 03:50 PM
:marine: My story could be enhanced as it occured in 1970, but was not uncommon. We did not think of complaining to anyone, but times were different then and unless someone was really hurt, it was accepted. There were occasions when things made the papers or in one case a Congressman got involved, but you kept it within the family. I am proud to have been an active Marine for 8 years. When childhood friends comment about how tough Marine Corp bootcamp is, I just smile.

SGT7477
03-03-08, 03:52 PM
Oh I seen a little thumping in 74 and it got worse after we left mainside that's my story and I'm sticking to it.

Old Marine
03-03-08, 03:53 PM
Depends on who is telling the story. If it is a recruit, its BS, but if it is a Marine who has been around for a while and has at least one hash mark, its probably a true story. If its an Officer fessing up, its also probably BS.

Isrowei
03-03-08, 03:54 PM
With all due respect sir, when brass comes on deck or is anywhere close to training areas, boot camp is a completely different place and I will leave it at that.

No disrespect taken. But I went through the same recruit training that everyone else did. I heard all the stories around the Geiger Tiger because boots have nothing better to talk about than their biggest boot camp story. I was one of them too at the time, sharing my worst. I've also been back as a Series Officer working in a training company. The DIs then were (and still are) some of my personal friends. We shared stories both current and years gone by. I will tell you that if boot camp became a different place in the presence of due authority, then the integrity of your Drill Instructors is void. Since when have you been taught that Marines have double standards? One for when the "brass" is around and one for the every day events. Never I hope. It's not how Marines do business.


I'll just simply say that boot camp today is no different than it was back in the 40's, 50's, and 60's in certain aspects - merely DI's are just not as open or obvious about it. All of the DI's who have gotten courtmartialed, NJP'ed, etc. did not do anything out of the ordinary (or anything wrong either IMO), they simply got caught.

You're absolutely wrong there. There's nothing more to say about it.


Marine Corps boot camp has the reputation that it does for a reason, and it's definitely not because of the confidence course or pool week. If every DI played by the rules and followed the book to the T, we'd all be a bunch of pussies.

When was the last time you read the Recruit Training Order? It amazes me that people deign to talk about a subject they really don't know. Yes, you were trained. So was I. But you'd probably be surprised how strict and how lenient the RTO really is. The cold hard facts of the matter is that Parris Island alone processes 20,000 recruits per year. Of those, the overwhelming majority are trained in strict adherance to the RTO. They walk beside you as Marines. Are they pussies too?

Marine Corps Boot Camp does have a legacy and an established reputation. But the reputation wasn't gained for the actions at Parris Island. It was gained because of the actions of Marines in combat. Naturally the birthplace of any great figure is of note, but the spotlight always is (and rightfully should be) on the Marine in the fleet, carrying on the Marine Corps legacy (and by extension, honoring his place of first training, boot camp).

DWG
03-03-08, 03:56 PM
With all due respect sir, when brass comes on deck or is anywhere close to training areas, boot camp is a completely different place and I will leave it at that.

I'll just simply say that boot camp today is no different than it was back in the 40's, 50's, and 60's in certain aspects - merely DI's are just not as open or obvious about it. All of the DI's who have gotten courtmartialed, NJP'ed, etc. did not do anything out of the ordinary (or anything wrong either IMO), they simply got caught.

Marine Corps boot camp has the reputation that it does for a reason, and it's definitely not because of the confidence course or pool week. If every DI played by the rules and followed the book to the T, we'd all be a bunch of pussies.
Pretty much the same lecture they gave us back in '68. "Do you want to be 'by the book' Marines, or REAL Marines." LOL; we all chorused "REAL Marines!"
:scared:
You are dead on Accord; when the brass shows up, the gloves go on! Same-o, same-o! Unfortunately it just takes one or two momma's boys to ruin a career, and it's a foolish DI that crosses too far over the line. Not that any of them ever did when I was there!;)

DWG
03-03-08, 04:04 PM
No disrespect taken. But I went through the same recruit training that everyone else did. I heard all the stories around the Geiger Tiger because boots have nothing better to talk about than their biggest boot camp story. I was one of them too at the time, sharing my worst. I've also been back as a Series Officer working in a training company. The DIs then were (and still are) some of my personal friends. We shared stories both current and years gone by. I will tell you that if boot camp became a different place in the presence of due authority, then the integrity of your Drill Instructors is void. Since when have you been taught that Marines have double standards? One for when the "brass" is around and one for the every day events. Never I hope. It's not how Marines do business.



You're absolutely wrong there. There's nothing more to say about it.



When was the last time you read the Recruit Training Order? It amazes me that people deign to talk about a subject they really don't know. Yes, you were trained. So was I. But you'd probably be surprised how strict and how lenient the RTO really is. The cold hard facts of the matter is that Parris Island alone processes 20,000 recruits per year. Of those, the overwhelming majority are trained in strict adherance to the RTO. They walk beside you as Marines. Are they pussies too?

Marine Corps Boot Camp does have a legacy and an established reputation. But the reputation wasn't gained for the actions at Parris Island. It was gained because of the actions of Marines in combat. Naturally the birthplace of any great figure is of note, but the spotlight always is (and rightfully should be) on the Marine in the fleet, carrying on the Marine Corps legacy (and by extension, honoring his place of first training, boot camp).


Wow! Gored somebody's ox there! Perhaps it boils down to perception; the one of the individual being "corrected" versus the one administering the "correction"! Someone who has been mamas' little darling boy their whole life may consider being yelled at and touched in, shall we say, a less than gentle manner, abuse of the most severe type; whereas a DI with 90 recruits to try to square away, only senses light persuasion when making a swift, positive reinforcement of the proper Marine way of doing something!

FistFu68
03-03-08, 04:06 PM
:evilgrin:IF I TOLD YOU THE TRUTH I'D HAVE TOO KILL YOU(LOL)WHY DO YOU NEED A BLANKET PARTY???:evilgrin: :usmc:

DWG
03-03-08, 04:08 PM
IF I TOLD YOU THE TRUTH I'D HAVE TOO KILL YOU(LOL)WHY DO YOU NEED A BLANKET PARTY??? :usmc:

Absolute fantasy; NEVAH HOPPEN!!!:D

FistFu68
03-03-08, 04:12 PM
:evilgrin: TOP SECRET-FOR EYE'S ONLY :evilgrin: :iwo:

Isrowei
03-03-08, 04:16 PM
Wow! Gored somebody's ox there! Perhaps it boils down to perception; the one of the individual being "corrected" versus the one administering the "correction"! Someone who has been mamas' little darling boy their whole life may consider being yelled at and touched in, shall we say, a less than gentle manner, abuse of the most severe type; whereas a DI with 90 recruits to try to square away, only senses light persuasion when making a swift, positive reinforcement of the proper Marine way of doing something!

Actually, I think your signature says it all.

I find it the greatest irony on this site that Marines will espouse integrity, good order and discipline, and strict adherence to orders.. except when it come to their boot camp experience (and by extension, the experience the new poolees will face). Then it's ok to bend the rules, go outside the box, because "that's how we train real Marines."

It's an oxymoron of the highest degree and there's no other way to put it. Either we (as Marines.. and more specifically, Marines representing the Marine Corps on this site) value integrity and military discipline.. or we don't.

What kind of moral authority does a man have when he tells people "Do as I say, but not as I do." This is exactly the picture you paint of your Drill Instructors. You illuminate how they exacted strict and demanding discipline and obedience from you ... but did in manners that clearly violated their oath as a Drill Instructor and the set orders and procedures that were (and still are) established.

A Marine who doesn't follow orders is a bad Marine and won't be a Marine very long. A Marine who demands obedience but willfully disobeys at the same time... is a hypocrite. So much for integrity.

DWG
03-03-08, 04:28 PM
All I know is what I experienced; I'm sure it is completely different now!

Guess I got told!:cry:

FistFu68
03-03-08, 04:34 PM
:evilgrin: YEA MARINE,YOU ARE RIGHT D.W;IF THEY SLAPPED THE HELL OF A CHITBIRD IN OCS.HE'D CRY TOO THE MAN,AND THEY WOULD PROBABLY PROMOTE HIM ON THE SPOT;AND MAKE HIM MY PLATOON COMMANDER(LMAO)THEN HE'D PROBABLY GET US ALL KILLED???:scared: :iwo:

Isrowei
03-03-08, 04:49 PM
Ah yes, the tried and true fallback. Blame it on the Officers and their training.

Quit dodging the question: How were your Drill Instructors such good Marines if they knowingly, willfully violated direct orders?

C'mon! I want to hear the answers! You're standing (virtually) in front of dozens of poolees and future Marines (and new Marines too) spouting this nonsense.

Explain to them why they should follow rules but apparently... they won't be "well-trained" if their Drill Instructors do!

Account for yourselves gentlemen. Inquiring minds (and future generations) want to know.

FistFu68
03-03-08, 04:59 PM
:evilgrin: LIGHTEN UP LT.WE LOVE YOU LEADERS OF MARINES,THE TIMES THEY ARE A CHANGING;BUT DON'T FORGET WHERE YOU CAME FROM MARINE.YOU ARE HOLDING THE LIVES OF YOUNG MARINES IN YOU'RE HAND'S.LEAD FROM THE FRONT,AND YOU'RE YOUNG MARINES WILL ALWAY'S TAKE CARE OF YOU LT.OF MARINES!!!:usmc: :iwo:

montana
03-03-08, 05:00 PM
hummm... sooo if we tell the truth about our bootcamp expiriances were liers???..dam
privet dont know sir

DWG
03-03-08, 05:03 PM
Chill Lt. I don't believe I accused any Marine of doing anything untoward. I did, and do, agree that DIs act differently around brass; I think I could get a big AMEN! to that from any Marine. Same happens in the civilian world, to a lesser degree. I stated it may be in the perception or the "eye of the beholder" as to what would constitute abuse as compared to discipline. If you want to convince poolees that the DI is going to hold their little hands and be their big "buddy", go ahead. I don't think it's changed that much. It still just comes down to how you see it and how you deal with it. Our DI group was relieved from duty, but then returned because no one would testify against them to back up the chit bird that brought charges.
BTW; the entire series was relieved at one time or another, all but one returned. I think he was later exonerated too.

SlingerDun
03-03-08, 05:06 PM
This'd be an interesting thread if i'd never been witness to boys gettin ass whupped. I don't break up fights, i think they are healthy in this generally sissyfied society. I'll stand back and wait for the combatants to gas out then jump up from my stack of tar's and turn the hose on em like dawgs on a suffocating afternoon hehehehaw. When a recruit or anybody, can't strike back without severe consequences, now that sticks in my craw. In boot camp i would have sucked up a beating if it happened, but from then on i'd pitch into em. If a recruit fought back i would quietly cheer for his bold young ass.

--->Dave

SlingerDun
03-03-08, 05:11 PM
chill out??? ligthen up??? sounds like quiff http://www.leatherneck.com/forums/images/icons/icon6.gif Let a Man say what on his mind.

--->Dave

Isrowei
03-03-08, 05:50 PM
hummm... sooo if we tell the truth about our bootcamp expiriances were liers???..dam
privet dont know sir

It's about representation.

I know plenty of Marines who smoked pot. However, I never speak of it in glorified terms and my opinion of those Marines is quite low. When they are punished for their knowing, willful action, I don't take issue with it. It is simply the set consquences for their actions.

However, when we discuss boot camp, the rules are somehow... different. Suddenly, violating the rules to conduct "training" is ok... even glorified. Here is where I have the issue.

Drill Instructor do break the rules from time to time. They are almost always held accountable for their actions (whether you saw it or not). It takes egregious action for a Drill Instructor to be relieved (as it should). However, even so, there are Marines who go that far at times.

I don't say things didn't happen. In fact, I know that some things most assuredly DID happen. But I also know that those Marines who did those actions compromised their integrity to do it. There is no other possible interpretation. I know I don't glorify their actions in public forums because their actions were not in keeping with the way Marines should conduct themselves (you wouldn't want a pot-smoking OTH winner being held up as the example for new Marines would you?).

The point is that as Marines, we are supposed to be leaders. We are supposed to exemplify the good moral integrity and character of the highest order. That's why the Marine Corps has the reputation it does. Not because of some rule-breaking drill instructors. As leaders, we should seek to instill that character in new Marines. But yet time and time again I watch these threads where the the ****bird Marines are held up as the example. And make no mistake... a Marine who refuses to obey orders is a ****bird, whether he be a drill instructor or not.

You can talk about what happened in proper context. We should all accept responsibility for our roles as examples and mentors to young impressionable Marines. Case in point: Accord hasn't been out of boot camp a year and already talking like he KNOWS they way things were (and should be). He didn't get that from his own recruit training experience. He got it by listening to older Marines whom he respected and now he's following their example.

That's why I have a problem with threads like these and why invariably we go round and round every time one comes up. An example is being set and an expectation is being passed on to new generations.

Is it the right one?

Apache
03-03-08, 06:07 PM
The year was 1965 and I had an attitude
My D.I. adjusted my attitude
So what's the problem ?

greensideout
03-03-08, 06:11 PM
Quote: "He got it by listening to older Marines whom he respected and now he's following their example."


I'm not sure about that LT. You make an assumption that the Marine cannot make his own judgement on what he has experienced? As far as emulating the older Marines---isn't that what has kept the Marine Corps the legend that it is!!!

thewookie
03-03-08, 06:15 PM
I think every Marine has their "thumping" stories from boot camp but the majority of the stories are about good hard training. But there's also the random acts of violence that some of us experienced, which is usually magnified when the story telling begins, and you can't ignore it or act like it didn't happen. Everyone wants to hear about the thumpings, because truthfully there's usually a funny story behind it, unless you were on the receiving end of it. My point is, that's what people want to hear about but it's difficult to put it into perspective of good hard training unless you've been there and done that.

Our platoon had plenty of remedial learning sessions, call them thumpings if you will, but they served a purpose. We never got thumped for no good reason, not that I saw.

SGT7477
03-03-08, 06:18 PM
Quote: "He got it by listening to older Marines whom he respected and now he's following their example."


I'm not sure about that LT. You make an assumption that the Marine cannot make his own judgement on what he has experienced? As far as emulating the older Marines---isn't that what has kept the Marine Corps the legend that it is!!!
How true the foundation had to start somewhere.:flag:

Big Jim
03-03-08, 06:27 PM
It's about representation.

I know plenty of Marines who smoked pot. However, I never speak of it in glorified terms and my opinion of those Marines is quite low. When they are punished for their knowing, willful action, I don't take issue with it. It is simply the set consquences for their actions.

However, when we discuss boot camp, the rules are somehow... different. Suddenly, violating the rules to conduct "training" is ok... even glorified. Here is where I have the issue.

Drill Instructor do break the rules from time to time. They are almost always held accountable for their actions (whether you saw it or not). It takes egregious action for a Drill Instructor to be relieved (as it should). However, even so, there are Marines who go that far at times.

I don't say things didn't happen. In fact, I know that some things most assuredly DID happen. But I also know that those Marines who did those actions compromised their integrity to do it. There is no other possible interpretation. I know I don't glorify their actions in public forums because their actions were not in keeping with the way Marines should conduct themselves (you wouldn't want a pot-smoking OTH winner being held up as the example for new Marines would you?).

The point is that as Marines, we are supposed to be leaders. We are supposed to exemplify the good moral integrity and character of the highest order. That's why the Marine Corps has the reputation it does. Not because of some rule-breaking drill instructors. As leaders, we should seek to instill that character in new Marines. But yet time and time again I watch these threads where the the ****bird Marines are held up as the example. And make no mistake... a Marine who refuses to obey orders is a ****bird, whether he be a drill instructor or not.

You can talk about what happened in proper context. We should all accept responsibility for our roles as examples and mentors to young impressionable Marines. Case in point: Accord hasn't been out of boot camp a year and already talking like he KNOWS they way things were (and should be). He didn't get that from his own recruit training experience. He got it by listening to older Marines whom he respected and now he's following their example.

That's why I have a problem with threads like these and why invariably we go round and round every time one comes up. An example is being set and an expectation is being passed on to new generations.

Is it the right one?

Lt., I do partially agree with you and DO understand your side of it to uphold the honor and exemplify our beloved Corps, but I also witnessed and observed things that were questionable, but in the end...I chose to accept them as the norm. I chose to put it in the civilian in me being moved over to make room for the Marine. I learned from all aspects of Marine Corps life, that's not to say I'm not learning anymore because I am still learning how much things have changed in the Corps. But as far as setting the example for ALL Marines, present and future, I agree with you. The only way to change it is to set the example for the future to follow. ...and things have changed from when I was in..hell...things are constantly changing. It's a comfort to know that we have the future Marines here and are tackling the new challenges successfully as they are. SEMPER FI....

Isrowei
03-03-08, 06:38 PM
Thanks Jim. I think I've said enough to express my point.

Have a great night everyone.

Marine84
03-03-08, 06:50 PM
Never saw it myself. It's a good thing I never had the chance to be a DI cause I would have gotten in trouble for b!tch slapping somebody.

DWG
03-03-08, 06:50 PM
I do declare; I think an officer could squeeze the pleasure out of a cold beer!:p

DWG
03-03-08, 06:51 PM
Never saw it myself. It's a good thing I never had the chance to be a DI cause I would have gotten in trouble for b!tch slapping somebody.

Yeah, but you just got a mean streak!:evilgrin:

Camper51
03-03-08, 07:37 PM
Actually, I think your signature says it all.

I find it the greatest irony on this site that Marines will espouse integrity, good order and discipline, and strict adherence to orders.. except when it come to their boot camp experience (and by extension, the experience the new poolees will face). Then it's ok to bend the rules, go outside the box, because "that's how we train real Marines."

It's an oxymoron of the highest degree and there's no other way to put it. Either we (as Marines.. and more specifically, Marines representing the Marine Corps on this site) value integrity and military discipline.. or we don't.

What kind of moral authority does a man have when he tells people "Do as I say, but not as I do." This is exactly the picture you paint of your Drill Instructors. You illuminate how they exacted strict and demanding discipline and obedience from you ... but did in manners that clearly violated their oath as a Drill Instructor and the set orders and procedures that were (and still are) established.

A Marine who doesn't follow orders is a bad Marine and won't be a Marine very long. A Marine who demands obedience but willfully disobeys at the same time... is a hypocrite. So much for integrity.


I agree with this 100%. Things do happen, however they are NOT the norm. Things happened in 1968 nwhen I went through and things have happened in the past year or two, however they are definitely in the minority.

Drill Instructors must uphold the tenets and training they have received and to do otherwise is to cheapen their integrity and honor as Marines.

I am sure there are many stories out there, I stated mine earlier, however maybe I should have also stated that I feel that MY 3 drill instructors behaved with integrity and honor at all times and they were NOT prone to thumping recruits. I was NOT beaten with a rifle buttstock in my experience but I was knocked backwards with a buttstroke, if you will, because of something I said. In no way was I ever injured, nor was any recruit in MY company. Would my drill instructor have been punished had he been seen doing this, probably, since drill instructors were not allowed to touch recruits in 1968, just as they aren't allowed to now.

mike christy
03-04-08, 07:16 PM
The year was 1965 and I had an attitude
My D.I. adjusted my attitude
So what's the problem ?

Attitude adjustment received 1976 :D made me a better man for it.

E5NAMKROW
03-05-08, 11:10 AM
D.i. In Training Lost His Mind With Me And Lost His Job.

jinelson
03-05-08, 11:34 AM
I said it before and I'll say it again. In recruit training in 1967 I never witnessed a Drill Instructor touch a recruit or even use abusive language, I did however see crap made into Marines. What happened in the platoon stayed in the platoon nuff said.

Jim

davblay
03-05-08, 12:09 PM
I agree with Jim on this one, in 1969 it was the same way! "I never saw a DI lay a hand on a recruit" for any reason, except to correct a position or what not! The bottom line is they trained 75 civilians in 8 weeks then, I assume the stress level must have been out the roof for them, looking back on it now! It was for us recruits! They never even "CUSSED US", as that would be offensive to some people! Nope....strickly by the book for my three DI's! (GOD forgive me). :angel:

jjpryor
03-05-08, 01:35 PM
In your opinion, how many of these boot camp thumping stories are for real,i.e "got four teeth knocked out", "got knocked unconcious", "got punched in the gut" , etc etc.? :confused:


In '63 we'd get slapped, BUT that's all. I never saw anyone punched, kicked, etc. Not saying it didn't happen though.

michaeleckard
03-05-08, 03:58 PM
I don't believe it happened in 1981. My DI's made you wish they would. they yelled at this one recruit load and mean then he p***ed himself.

JJA1990
03-06-08, 09:58 PM
My dad was in the Army at the end of Vietnam, and he told me that they had no qualms about hitting you etc. He even showed me some scars.

What sucked for him though, was that some people that he went through basic with got caught getting weekend passes etc from the drll sergeants, and so they made everyone in his platoon go through basic camp again.

I know it was the Army, but if you got beat in the army.. I am sure it happened in the Marines?

davblay
03-07-08, 12:40 AM
I agree with Jim on this one, in 1969 it was the same way! "I never saw a DI lay a hand on a recruit" for any reason, except to correct a position or what not! The bottom line is they trained 75 civilians in 8 weeks then, I assume the stress level must have been out the roof for them, looking back on it now! It was for us recruits! They never even "CUSSED US", as that would be offensive to some people! Nope....strickly by the book for my three DI's! (GOD forgive me). :angel:

To Clarify my last post, I never SAW IT HAPPEN ( did it happen....sure), and I was sarcastic when I said they never cussed us! I heard words I had never heard before, or since for that matter. LMAO

DWG
03-07-08, 06:52 AM
In reference to JJA1990's deleted post; I think that was the plot to "Stripes". Nevah hoppen!! Or as the illustrious Leprechaun would say;
Pfaw!!!

littledude12327
03-07-08, 07:54 AM
My stepfather told me he was laghing because his DI asked if he had a brain fart. Then his DI asked his if he saw his knuckels then raired back.... then asked the same question.... after his answer the DI pelted him right between the eyes.

DWG
03-07-08, 08:06 AM
With regard to my posts; I never saw a Drill Instuctor hurt a recruit on purpose. I only saw it happen at all one time, and that was an accident in hand to hand combat. I believe the recruit survived and the DI underwent investigation and was exonerated. There were times when corrective action was taken to emphasize a point, but no one was hurt, other than perhaps their pride, and everyone got over it.

Phantom Blooper
03-07-08, 08:10 AM
I only seen thumpin' on Sunday afternoons when we were cleaning our gear and scrubbin' our laundry and they let us watch the Disney movies! That's my story and I'm stickin' to it!:evilgrin:

DWG
03-07-08, 08:12 AM
Thumping? :( or humping?:scared:

FistFu68
03-07-08, 11:57 AM
:evilgrin: THE P.T. AT PARRIS ISLAND KICKED OUR AZZEZ SO BAD THE D.I'S DIDN'T NEED TOO "THUMP US".COULDN'T WAIT TILL LITES OUT,SO WE COULD HAVE A "PARTY" FOR THE CHITBIRD OF THE DAY?:D

DWG
03-07-08, 12:03 PM
:evilgrin: THE P.T. AT PARRIS ISLAND KICKED OUR AZZEZ SO BAD THE D.I'S DIDN'T NEED TOO "THUMP US".COULDN'T WAIT TILL LITES OUT,SO WE COULD HAVE A "PARTY" FOR THE CHITBIRD OF THE DAY?:D

I'll bet you served cake and ice cream at your "parties" too!:angel:

greensideout
03-11-08, 08:15 PM
We Have All Had Our Say---now Let's Hear What R Lee Ermey Has To Say. If This Does'nt Take You Back Marines, Nothing Will! :D

http://video.stumbleupon.com/#p=fvjn62b2a4

FistFu68
03-11-08, 08:59 PM
:evilgrin: FOR A "HONORARY/G/SGT. YEA LETS HEAR HIS BULLCHIT,BY THE WAY WHAT UNIT WAS HE WITH AND WHAT MOS.BEFORE HOLLYWOOD;AND SMOKING C-GARS WITH YOU KNOW WHO?(LMAO):D :iwo:

semperfiman
03-11-08, 09:28 PM
1971 i remember i was standing at port arms then all of a sudden my balls said to me you ****bag dont you know how to position yourself all of a sudden my balls slammed into the butt of my m14 i was never out of position again oh the di was at the other end of the squadbay true story honest injun

jrhd97
03-11-08, 09:57 PM
:evilgrin: FOR A "HONORARY/G/SGT. YEA LETS HEAR HIS BULLCHIT,BY THE WAY WHAT UNIT WAS HE WITH AND WHAT MOS.BEFORE HOLLYWOOD;AND SMOKING C-GARS WITH YOU KNOW WHO?(LMAO):D :iwo:
Early life & military career

Born in Emporia, Kansas (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emporia%2C_Kansas), Ermey enlisted in the United States Marine Corps (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_Marine_Corps) in 1961 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1961), after being arrested several times as a teenager. A court judge gave him the choice of the military or jail. He later joked that the Marine Corps "put a screeching halt to my unconventional manner." He spent two years as a drill instructor (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drill_instructor) at Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marine_Corps_Recruit_Depot_San_Diego) in San Diego (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/San_Diego%2C_California), California (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/California), from 1965 to 1967. In 1968, Ermey arrived in Vietnam (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vietnam) where he served for 14 months with the Marine Wing Support Group 17 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marine_Wing_Support_Group_17). He then served two tours of duty (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tour_of_duty) in Okinawa (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Okinawa), Japan (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japan), during which he rose to the rank of Staff Sergeant (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Staff_Sergeant) and was medically discharged (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Medical_discharge) in 1972 for several injuries incurred during his tours. He did not receive a Purple Heart (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Purple_Heart) due to his injuries being noncombat in origin. Ermey has admitted that he still has nightmares (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nightmare) about his combat experiences. Ermey was later honorarily bestowed the rank of Gunnery Sergeant by the Marine Corps

FistFu68
03-11-08, 11:43 PM
:evilgrin: HOLLYWOOD TOO THE BONE(LMFAO):D :iwo:

silverdollar
03-28-08, 08:17 AM
Well I don`t know how old the LT is, but I do know that he was not in my Marine Corp. I remember doing manual of arms at 0200 in our skivvies and a DI using an M1 to get our attention. I also remember walking around carrying an M1 with my thumb. if anyone here can imagine what it feels like to get your thumb caught in the bolt of an M1 and then have the rifle hanging from your thumb for a while. this is just part of what happened to me, The LT would never believe the things that I saw. I went through PI in May 1954.:marine:

DWG
03-28-08, 09:46 AM
Well I don`t know how old the LT is, but I do know that he was not in my Marine Corp. I remember doing manual of arms at 0200 in our skivvies and a DI using an M1 to get our attention. I also remember walking around carrying an M1 with my thumb. if anyone here can imagine what it feels like to get your thumb caught in the bolt of an M1 and then have the rifle hanging from your thumb for a while. this is just part of what happened to me, The LT would never believe the things that I saw. I went through PI in May 1954.:marine:

Back to the original question, which I believe referred to malicious treatment of recruits by Drill Instuctors. Very little of what I've heard contradicts what I said; No (responsible) DI ever purposely inflicted damage to a recruit. Sometimes, some people, need more emphasis on attention to detail than others. Rather than asking "pretty please" over and over, DIs have techniques that drive the point home in timely manner so they can continue to move the training phase forward. These techniques are time tested and proven to be good training tools and an example to the rest of the platoon. Of course you can, and will at times, have a nut case end up in a smokey the bear hat, and when this happens I truly believe the Corps does it's best to weed them out as fast as possible. Stories of these cases spread faster than any thing else and everyone, at times, thinks the DIs are out to kill them for real. The DIs have a tough job to do and a limited time to do it in. Their job is not to harm (permanently) recruits, but to turn them into basic Marines. Sometimes the little darlings get their feelings or pride hurt, but it is for the greater good. To be marines they need to learn to put the Corps ahead of their own nasty, selfish little selves. Countless thousands have been through it, and with those numbers alone, there are going to be accidents and/or misadventures. these become the stuff of legend and every one loves telling a good boot camp horror story. And, yes, when the officers aren't around, it gets a little more intense, just not the psychotic rampages we like to remember!;)

p.s. did your thumb actually fall off, or did you remember not to make that mistake again?

davblay
03-28-08, 10:12 AM
:evilgrin: FOR A "HONORARY/G/SGT. YEA LETS HEAR HIS BULLCHIT,BY THE WAY WHAT UNIT WAS HE WITH AND WHAT MOS.BEFORE HOLLYWOOD;AND SMOKING C-GARS WITH YOU KNOW WHO?(LMAO):D :iwo:
As Bad as I hate to agree with Fistfu, he is right about the "GUNNY"! If you'll look at his medals and ribbons you will see most of them are unit awards, just like mine are! I served in the same unit as he did, only he had just left when I got there, so a lot of Marines knew him. My Section Gunny was his drinking buddy for God sake! His injuries were from a board (Lumber plank) falling on his shoulder inside a bunker, and it wasn't being shelled! That was simply an accident, like my injury was. We were a squadron of heavy equipment mechanics and operators, heavy work and lots of people get hurt doing it sometimes. We had someone getting hurt every other day, one way or an other. Did we see combat? Sure we did, but it was always from gooks coming into our area from Dogpatch to steal food and such. Oh we got a few rockets that were intended for the air strip that was a cross the road, but they walked those right on target very quick! Some of us were picked to fly north to a downed Bull dozer, or something, and get it back up and running, we might see some action there (I did), but that was about it.

SSgt R. Lee Ermey is a lucky Marine that was in the right place at the right time to get discovered by hollywood for the job that he truly wanted! He does a good job representing the Corps. But we was just another Marine, that's all! Not any kind of HERO! Just like Drew Carey, a reservist, that missed a lot of drills when his comic career got kicked off. Right place, right time!

I'll step down off of my soap box now.

Dave

Old Marine
03-28-08, 05:09 PM
As Bad as I hate to agree with Fistfu, he is right about the "GUNNY"! If you'll look at his medals and ribbons you will see most of them are unit awards, just like mine are! I served in the same unit as he did, only he had just left when I got there, so a lot of Marines knew him. My Section Gunny was his drinking buddy for God sake! His injuries were from a board (Lumber plank) falling on his shoulder inside a bunker, and it wasn't being shelled! That was simply an accident, like my injury was. We were a squadron of heavy equipment mechanics and operators, heavy work and lots of people get hurt doing it sometimes. We had someone getting hurt every other day, one way or an other. Did we see combat? Sure we did, but it was always from gooks coming into our area from Dogpatch to steal food and such. Oh we got a few rockets that were intended for the air strip that was a cross the road, but they walked those right on target very quick! Some of us were picked to fly north to a downed Bull dozer, or something, and get it back up and running, we might see some action there (I did), but that was about it.

SSgt R. Lee Ermey is a lucky Marine that was in the right place at the right time to get discovered by hollywood for the job that he truly wanted! He does a good job representing the Corps. But we was just another Marine, that's all! Not any kind of HERO! Just like Drew Carey, a reservist, that missed a lot of drills when his comic career got kicked off. Right place, right time!

I'll step down off of my soap box now.

Dave

AMEN to that.....

Old Marine
03-28-08, 05:20 PM
Well I don`t know how old the LT is, but I do know that he was not in my Marine Corp. I remember doing manual of arms at 0200 in our skivvies and a DI using an M1 to get our attention. I also remember walking around carrying an M1 with my thumb. if anyone here can imagine what it feels like to get your thumb caught in the bolt of an M1 and then have the rifle hanging from your thumb for a while. this is just part of what happened to me, The LT would never believe the things that I saw. I went through PI in May 1954.:marine:

Having gone through Boot Camp in 1953 I defintly agree with this post. If I wasn't punched in the stomach at least once a day I figured the D.I. was sick or something.

Marines should remember that Lt.'s, unless they are Mustangs, have never been to Marine Corps Boot Camp. They become Series Officers and read the SOP for Recruit Training and think they have it down pat. Wrong Answer. Its like Las Vegas, What Goes on in Recruit Training, Stays In Recruit Training.

After having spent 7 years of my career on the Drill Field at San Diego, I could tell you a lot of stories about what these old eyes saw going on. The thing was back then, that you went to work with X-amount of rank and picked up what was left at the end of the day.

Not ragging on Lt's, but reality is reality.

DWG
03-28-08, 05:30 PM
Isrowei is a mustang! Boot camp must be more PC now than it was.