PDA

View Full Version : Figgered the Law Dogs needed...



wrbones
07-22-02, 11:09 PM
...their own thread. ;)

Ploft
07-23-02, 12:34 AM
Bones is that a new picture of Troop???

troop901
07-23-02, 01:10 AM
thanks ploft,sheesh lol. u know we be lean, mean fighting machines. Dont make me bring up Me, Myself and Irene, all though that is a great movie lol. Miss yakkin with ya though, cant get on the chat and yes, cleaned out my cookies but its my internet explorer that has been giving me problems. So no shaff, its aint yer fault on this one but i will blame u anyways lol.

SSgtOfMarines
07-23-02, 09:24 AM
http://www.dunkindonuts.com/images/dunkin_logo.gif

thedrifter
07-23-02, 10:50 AM
So Now I see why they like the nightshift......LOL.......

http://www.sokissable.com/images/newuniform.gif


Dedication..........

http://www.sokissable.com/images/dedicated.jpg

Sempers,

Roger

Ploft
07-23-02, 10:55 AM
It was a toss up between you and Hawk ????

Ploft
07-23-02, 10:57 AM
It was a toss up between you and Hawk ????
Carry had the same badge # as the kid Carry 549 Just remove the 5 he is 49 sent him picture with the 5 crossed out he still gets crap from it.

Sparrowhawk
07-23-02, 11:10 AM
Some of us were still lean and mean after a few years on the force

Here's a flick taken before I left the force. When I served as a Chaplain and Crime analyst. I only have two rows of ribbons that had survived all those years in the garage. Never bothered to get an updated record or ribbons untill I retired fromt eh force and requested a copy of my military records, awards and ribbons.

Boy was I surprised, never knew the Corps had me listed with a disability until I retired from the Police force. LAPD probabily wouldn't have hired me if they had known...LOL

Of the 27 Marines that I have found that I served with in Vietnam, four or five of them went into some type of Law enforcement work.

Bones a thread for Law Dogs may be needed after all. TheDrifter still runs up against the wall each time I email him a message...LOL

LadyLeatherneck
07-23-02, 12:45 PM
"I am the Trooper"

I have been where you fear to be,
I have seen what you fear to see,
I have done what you fear to do -
All these things I have done for you.

I am the person you lean upon,
The one you cast your scorn upon,
The one you bring your troubles to -
All these people I've been for you.

The one you ask to stand apart,
The one you feel should have no heart,
The one you call "The Statie,"
But I'm just a person, not to be hated.

And through the years I've come to see,
That I am not always what you ask of me;
So, take this badge ... take this gun ...
Will you take it ... will anyone?

And when you watch a person die
And hear a battered baby cry,
Then do you think that you can be
All these things you ask of me?

(Author unknown)

http://www.state.oh.us/ohiostatepatrol/wheelt.gif

Barrio_rat
07-23-02, 01:29 PM
Here are a couple that I like, as it is what I do...

"THE FORGOTTEN COP"

excerpted from an article by CO Donald Premo, New York Dept of Corrections Services"

I am the "forgotten cop" hidden from public view, doing a dangerous, thankless duty on the world's most dangerous beat: I am a New York State correctional officer in a maximum security facility.

My beat is inhabited by convicted felons. I am outnumbered by as much as 20,30 and even 40 to one during my workday. Contrary to popular belief, I work without a firearm. My neck is on the line every minute of every day.

I am empowered by the state to enforce penal laws, rules and regulations. In short, I am a policeman, hoping someday to receive the respect and the approval of the public whom I silently serve.

A prison is a misunderstood environment. The average person has little knowledge of its workings. Society sends its criminals to correctional facilities and as time passes each criminal fades from memory until the collective prison population becomes a vision where hordes of "bad people" are warehoused away from decent society in a place where they can cause no further harm.

The notion that inmates cease to be a problem when they are incarcerated couldn't be further from the truth. The reality is that felonies are committed daily in correctional facilities. The prisons and jails where correctional officers work are full of violence perpetrated by the inmate population against each other and against the staff.

In the course of maintaining order officers endure countless humiliations. Many are spit upon while others have endured having urine and feces thrown at them. Officers are pinched, kicked, bitten, stabbed and slashed with homemade weapons, taken hostage and face hidden dangers in the form of AIDS, TUBERCULOSIS`and HEPATITIS or sadly even MURDERED in the line of duty.

Why don't we as correction officers retaliate? Because it's our job to maintain professional composure and refrain from retaliation or face possible dismissal.

You will never see me on "RESCUE 911" or "TOP COPS" None of the "FORGOTTEN COPS" will ever be featured. We are too busy trying to stay alive and walk our beat as best we can.


------------------------------------------------------------------------------


A Poem dedicated to Correction Officers

This poem is dedicated to the forgotten ones, the correctional officers. I would like to commend these courageous men and women for doing a helluva job of maintaining safety and security in the jails and prisons/ as correctional officers, we know how difficult a task it is to perform our daily duties;

Now I would like to let everyone else know. Just as the men and women in blue attend roll call before their tour of duty, so do we, but instead of being armed with pistols, we are armed with whistles. Just as the men and women in blue, we too do not know if we will greet our loved ones at the end of the day. It takes a correctional officer to deal with society's undesirables, the overcrowding of prisons, the thanklessness of the public and to efficiently carry out the duties of a job that so many criticize and so little want. During our tour of duty not only are we correctional officers we are also; police officers, fire persons, suicide watch, coroners, nurses, counselors, computer operators, mail persons, newspaper delivery persons, the united parcel service, and more...... And with all of this in mind at the beginning of our tour... We will stand tall beneath our
hats. With pride we wear our shields. And with unity, integrity, and professionalism, Like soldiers we march side by side into our unpredictable institutions both Bonafide and qualified to handle any situation that may erupt. So please, do not call us "prison guards" Acknowledge us as professionals And address us as Correctional Officers.

Latanya Long Philadelphia Prison System, Correctional Officer

thedrifter
07-23-02, 01:44 PM
"The American Policeman"

Every day Policemen go to work, they serve their country and the people in more ways than recognized. By their mere presence, they protect and serve the citizens of every City and State and deter criminal activity.

Their call to duty lies deeper then what the public witnesses. Every day, every shift, and every hour, their lives are put at risk. Inside their hearts, they have Pride, Courage, Honor, and Loyalty. From issuing a citation to a traffic offender, to fighting the most violent criminals, they’re here to make the streets and neighborhoods safe.

Safe, so that Old Glory may fly proudly.

Safe, so that the President and Congress can effectively govern America.

Safe, so that the Soldiers may live in peace to protect our Country from foreign enemies.

Safe, so that citizens may tour the Country, learn the history, and visit monumental sites that gave America freedom.

Safe, so those families can peacefully live.

One day could be quite peaceful, while the next could be time to rock and roll. That is why they must never go against the brotherhood that is formed. City, State, or Federal, all Police, nationwide, has a common bond. A special Comradeship. They are their own family. One must never leave a brother behind, become a quitter, or worse yet, a coward. Lead, follow, or get the hell out of the way.

When their shift is over, they hang up their gun belts, take off their badges, and return home to their families. But, their service never ends. It continues to make it safe, for YOU.

By

JEFFREY E. KLEINSMITH
SERGEANT
U.S. SECRET SERVICE
UNIFORMED DIVISION

Sempers,

Roger

Sparrowhawk
07-23-02, 02:19 PM
Now, why do you think Ladyleatherneck gets all shook up when she sees this badge?

<A href="http://new.wavlist.com/soundfx/032/car-cop3.wav">http://www.irvingpd.com/badge.jpg</a>


<b>CLICK ON IT, To FIND OUT!</B>

ROTFLMAO

LadyLeatherneck
07-23-02, 04:13 PM
Okay Sparrow whatever it is I'll have to wait til
I get home to find out..darn firewalls.

troop901
07-23-02, 09:12 PM
Thanks candy, thought u forgot bout that poem.

troop901
07-23-02, 10:59 PM
I understand where you are coming from rat, I have always said, the only other job I would want less then the one I have now is that of a CO. I deal with em on the street, u deal with them in the house, from me to you, thank you and make sure ya make it home at the end of that shift.