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yellowwing
02-22-07, 09:16 AM
Harry looks to follow tradition
BBC News UK, 22 February 2007 (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/6384825.stm)

The deployment of Prince Harry's regiment to Iraq has been confirmed by the Ministry of Defence.

The young soldier is not the first member of the current Royal Family to take part in active combat.

Harry's uncle, Prince Andrew, fought in the Falklands War.

Prince Andrew joined the Navy in 1979 and, after gaining his Royal Marines green beret, went on to elementary flying training at RAF Leeming, Yorkshire.

Active service

In April 1982, after being presented with his wings by Prince Philip, he left with the aircraft carrier HMS Invincible on active service during the Falklands War.

In 1997, after receiving various commendations from the forces, Andrew was appointed to join the Ministry of Defence in London as a staff officer in the Directorate of Naval Operations.

His 22-year service in the Armed Forces ended in July 2001.

Indeed, there is a long tradition of embarking on a military career in the Royal Family.

But not all royal military careers have been long and distinguished.

Theatre production

Harry's other uncle, Prince Edward, had only a brief stint in the Armed Forces.

He joined the Royal Marines - the first member of the Royal Family to do so - as a second lieutenant in 1983.

Prince Edward completed a two-week course at Lympstone before going to Jesus College, Cambridge, to read for history on a Marines-sponsored cadetship.

He subsequently spent five weeks a year with the Marines, including a short tour in Belize.

But he failed to adapt to military life and eventually left in 1987 to work in theatre production for Andrew Lloyd-Webber's Really Useful Group.

Harry's father, the Prince of Wales, took up his first service appointment in 1969 as colonel-in-chief of the Royal Regiment of Wales.

He went on to become the colonel of the Welsh Guards in 1975, in succession to the Duke of Edinburgh, and now holds a number of service appointments.

He spent six months at the Royal Air Force College at Cranwell learning to fly jet aircraft in 1971 and obtained his RAF wings.

In the autumn of that year, the prince entered the Royal Navy.

Flying duties

Following service on a guided-missile destroyer and two frigates, he qualified as a helicopter pilot in 1974 at the Royal Naval Air Station at Yeovilton in Somerset.

Later, the prince joined 845 Naval Air Squadron on commando flying duties, operating from the aircraft carrier HMS Hermes.

In early 1976 he took command of the coastal minehunter HMS Bronington. The prince left the Navy the same year.

He currently holds the ceremonial ranks of rear-admiral in the Navy, major-general in the Army and air vice-marshal in the RAF.

Harry's grandfather, the Duke of Edinburgh, had a distinguished military career, serving during World War II.

He joined the Navy as a cadet in 1939 and, after serving on a number of ships, he was promoted to the position of lieutenant in July 1942.

In October of that year he became first lieutenant of the HMS Walllace on which he was serving at the time.

After serving with distinction on several other vessels, Prince Philip's naval career came to an end when the death of his father-in-law, King George VI, was announced in 1952.

Prince Philip remains close to every branch of service life, and is said to have influenced the decision of his children and grandchildren to serve.

In December 2006 Harry's brother, William, graduated from Sandhurst Military Academy in Surrey.

The 24-year-old, who joined the Blues and Royals regiment, began his career as an officer at Combermere Barracks, Windsor in January.

In March he begins a five-month training stint at Bovington Camp, Dorset.

In preparation for his future position as head of the armed forces, William will also spend time with the RAF and Navy.

thedrifter
02-22-07, 09:38 AM
Britain’s Prince Harry to serve in Iraq

By Tariq Panja - The Associated Press
Posted : Thursday Feb 22, 2007 7:37:46 EST

LONDON — Prince Harry, the third in line to the British throne, will be deployed to Iraq, the Ministry of Defence said Thursday.

His regiment, the Blues and Royals, is expected to deploy to Iraq this spring. Harry could become the first royal to see combat since his uncle, Prince Andrew, served in the Falklands war against Argentina in 1982.

Harry, a second lieutenant, has expressed his desire to serve alongside his comrades in Iraq, saying that there was “no way” he was going to undergo rigorous training and then stay away from the battlefield. He graduated last year from Royal Military Academy at Sandhurst.

Britain’s Ministry of Defense has previously said that Harry could be kept out of situations where his presence could jeopardize his comrades.

The 22-year-old prince, known as Troop Commander Wales by his regiment, has trained to command 11 soldiers and four Scimitar tanks.

In joining the military, Harry followed a royal tradition: his father, Prince Charles, was a pilot with the Royal Air Force and Royal Navy, and a ship commander, and Harry’s grandfather, Prince Philip, had a distinguished career in the Royal Navy during World War II.

Prince Andrew was a Royal Navy pilot.

On Wednesday, Prime Minister Tony Blair announced that Britain would be reducing its commitment in Iraq, withdrawing 1,600 soldiers in the next few months.

Ellie

lilspitfire66
02-27-07, 09:55 AM
Harry looks to follow tradition
BBC News UK, 22 February 2007 (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/6384825.stm)

The deployment of Prince Harry's regiment to Iraq has been confirmed by the Ministry of Defence.

The young soldier is not the first member of the current Royal Family to take part in active combat.

Harry's uncle, Prince Andrew, fought in the Falklands War.

Prince Andrew joined the Navy in 1979 and, after gaining his Royal Marines green beret, went on to elementary flying training at RAF Leeming, Yorkshire.

Active service

In April 1982, after being presented with his wings by Prince Philip, he left with the aircraft carrier HMS Invincible on active service during the Falklands War.

In 1997, after receiving various commendations from the forces, Andrew was appointed to join the Ministry of Defence in London as a staff officer in the Directorate of Naval Operations.

His 22-year service in the Armed Forces ended in July 2001.

Indeed, there is a long tradition of embarking on a military career in the Royal Family.

But not all royal military careers have been long and distinguished.

Theatre production

Harry's other uncle, Prince Edward, had only a brief stint in the Armed Forces.

He joined the Royal Marines - the first member of the Royal Family to do so - as a second lieutenant in 1983.

Prince Edward completed a two-week course at Lympstone before going to Jesus College, Cambridge, to read for history on a Marines-sponsored cadetship.

He subsequently spent five weeks a year with the Marines, including a short tour in Belize.

But he failed to adapt to military life and eventually left in 1987 to work in theatre production for Andrew Lloyd-Webber's Really Useful Group.

Harry's father, the Prince of Wales, took up his first service appointment in 1969 as colonel-in-chief of the Royal Regiment of Wales.

He went on to become the colonel of the Welsh Guards in 1975, in succession to the Duke of Edinburgh, and now holds a number of service appointments.

He spent six months at the Royal Air Force College at Cranwell learning to fly jet aircraft in 1971 and obtained his RAF wings.

In the autumn of that year, the prince entered the Royal Navy.

Flying duties

Following service on a guided-missile destroyer and two frigates, he qualified as a helicopter pilot in 1974 at the Royal Naval Air Station at Yeovilton in Somerset.

Later, the prince joined 845 Naval Air Squadron on commando flying duties, operating from the aircraft carrier HMS Hermes.

In early 1976 he took command of the coastal minehunter HMS Bronington. The prince left the Navy the same year.

He currently holds the ceremonial ranks of rear-admiral in the Navy, major-general in the Army and air vice-marshal in the RAF.

Harry's grandfather, the Duke of Edinburgh, had a distinguished military career, serving during World War II.

He joined the Navy as a cadet in 1939 and, after serving on a number of ships, he was promoted to the position of lieutenant in July 1942.

In October of that year he became first lieutenant of the HMS Walllace on which he was serving at the time.

After serving with distinction on several other vessels, Prince Philip's naval career came to an end when the death of his father-in-law, King George VI, was announced in 1952.

Prince Philip remains close to every branch of service life, and is said to have influenced the decision of his children and grandchildren to serve.

In December 2006 Harry's brother, William, graduated from Sandhurst Military Academy in Surrey.

The 24-year-old, who joined the Blues and Royals regiment, began his career as an officer at Combermere Barracks, Windsor in January.

In March he begins a five-month training stint at Bovington Camp, Dorset.

In preparation for his future position as head of the armed forces, William will also spend time with the RAF and Navy.

It's about time too. What's the whole point of doing all the training if he can't go out and fight in Iraq like the men under his command. That's the whole point of the exercise.

Okay so he'll be a target for the insurgents out there. So? Just like anyone else out there in the military. But he's in the British Army now, I'm sure he'll know the situ that he'll be in.

Oh yeah you forgot to mention something else here ~ her Majesty the Queen did her stint too in the armed forces ~ Royal Air Force old bean. She was an MT driver during the Second World War. :thumbup:

ggyoung
02-27-07, 11:14 AM
Now if some of America's top dogs get there sons in the Marines or what ever to serve. I don't think that this will happen to offton.

lilspitfire66
02-27-07, 11:23 AM
Now if some of America's top dogs get there sons in the Marines or what ever to serve. I don't think that this will happen to offton.

But I thought that they did. It's a British tradition handed down from one generation to another.

DWG
02-27-07, 01:04 PM
Now if some of America's top dogs get there sons in the Marines or what ever to serve. I don't think that this will happen to offton.

I believe John McCains' son is in the Marines! But, yes, there should be more. And military service should be a requirement to vote or to run for office!

RLeon
02-27-07, 02:35 PM
I believe John McCains' son is in the Marines! But, yes, there should be more. And military service should be a requirement to vote or to run for office!
Private Jimmy McCain USMC will be serving in the infantry.
:thumbup: :flag:

yellowwing
02-27-07, 02:37 PM
...and his Company Honorman was one of our own Leathereck.com prodigies. :thumbup:

jinelson
02-27-07, 02:45 PM
Thats a fact LCpl Dominic Stam did us proud!

Jim

yellowwing
02-27-07, 02:48 PM
Give'em Hell Jimmie! Give'em Hell Dominic! :evilgrin:

lilspitfire66
02-27-07, 04:53 PM
I believe John McCains' son is in the Marines! But, yes, there should be more. And military service should be a requirement to vote or to run for office!

You are probably right there because at least if you had a leader with some experience and knowledge of the military he or she would know how to better utilise them and also be a better statesperson on the world stage. Well there's one chappie here already that fits the bill to run office and has had experience in the US Navy ~ John McCain. :thumbup:

I don't know about military service being a requirement to vote though. That would go against democracy and freedom of speech etc. And it would certainly get up the noses of the democratic policy makers and the liberally minded American public. Sorry!!

ggyoung
02-27-07, 06:03 PM
There is so much that could be done if the US was to install say 2 year hitch in some kind of work project that would benafit man and the country. Something like the CCCs.

DWG
02-27-07, 06:11 PM
I don't know about military service being a requirement to vote though. That would go against democracy and freedom of speech etc. And it would certainly get up the noses of the democratic policy makers and the liberally minded American public. Sorry!!

How, exactly, would certain requirements for citizenship go against democracy. Surely there should be some requirement, beside being born, for sufferage. If you aren't willing to work on the boat, why should you be given a voice in how to steer it? Any one wanting to be a citizen should be obligated to serve the public good; either through the military or through public service. Say 6 yrs. military or 10 yrs public service. Personally, I think if you don't pay taxes you shouldn't be allowed to vote on how that money is spent! Sure would put a crimp on the democrats scouring the welfare lines to garner votes(or the repubs trying to make illegals "legal"). There is no constitutional gaurantee to the right to vote. It is time to put restrictions on the mob who would vote themselves the contents of the treasury!
:mad: