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yellowwing
12-30-06, 01:58 PM
The President of the United States
Takes Pleasure in Presenting
The Navy Cross
To
Joseph B. Perez
Lance Corporal, United States Marine Corps

For Services as Set Forth in the Following

Citation:
For extraordinary heroism as Rifleman, Company I, 3d Battalion, 5th Marines, 1st Marine Division, I Marine Expeditionary Force in support of Operation IRAQI FREEDOM on 4 April 2003.

While clearing near Route 6 during the advance into Baghdad, 1st Platoon came under intense enemy fire. As the point man for the lead squad and the most exposed member of the platoon, Lance Corporal Perez came under the majority of these fires. Without hesitation, he continuously employed his M16A4 rifle to destroy the enemy while calmly directing accurate fires for his squad.

He led the charge down a trench destroying the enemy and while closing and under tremendous enemy fire, threw a grenade into a trench that the enemy was occupying. While under a heavy volume of fire. Lance Corporal Perez fired an AT-4 rocket into a machine gun bunker, completely destroying it and killing four enemy personnel.

His actions enabled the squad to maneuver safely to the enemy position and seize it. In an effort to link up with 3d Platoon on his platoon's left flank, Lance Corporal Perez continued to destroy enemy combatants with precision rifle fire.

As he worked his way to the left, he was hit by enemy fire, sustaining gunshot wounds to his torso and shoulder. Despite being seriously injured, Lance Corporal Perez directed the squad to take cover and gave the squad accurate fire direction to the enemy that enabled the squad to reorganize and destroy the enemy.

By his outstanding display of decisive leadership, unlimited courage in the face of heavy enemy fire, and utmost devotion to duty, Lance Corporal Perez reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.


*********

yellowwing
01-02-07, 01:17 PM
A Marine Lt Col analysis of L/Cpl Perez:

By Matthew Dodd
Soldiers for the Truth, 06-17-2004 (http://www.sftt.us/cgi-bin/csNews/csNews.cgi?database=DefenseWatch%202004.db&command=viewone&op=t&id=214&rnd=620.492329887348)

“When you're out there, you don't think about any of this stuff. I was thinking about keeping the boys alive and keeping out of trouble….”

“Mom, this is what Marines do, we take care of our boys.”

Those humble and responsible words were spoken by a twenty-three year-old Marine when asked about his Iraqi battlefield exploits as detailed in his recently awarded Navy Cross. His “stuff” is shared with you below, and “taking care of our boys” is what every American should be thanking him for today.

The Navy Cross is the Nation’s second-highest award for valor, surpassed only by the Medal of Honor. To date, three Marines have received the Navy Cross for their battlefield heroics in Operation Iraqi Freedom, with more on the way, I am sure. The Navy Cross is equivalent to the Army’s Distinguished Service Cross and the Air Force Cross. According to official sources:


“The Navy Cross is awarded to a person who, while serving in any capacity with the Navy or Marine Corps, distinguishes himself by extraordinary heroism not justifying the award of the Medal of Honor—(1) while engaged in an action against an enemy of the United States; (2) while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an opposing foreign force; or (3) while serving with friendly forces engaged in an armed conflict against an opposing force in which the United States is not a belligerent party. To warrant this distinctive decoration, the act or the execution of duty must be performed in the presence of great danger or at great personal risk and must be performed in such a manner as to set the individual apart from his shipmates or fellow Marines. An accumulation of minor acts of heroism does not justify the award. The high standards demanded must be borne in mind when recommending the award.”

The third remarkable Marine to earn the Navy Cross was Lance Corporal Joseph B. Perez, USMC, for service as set forth in the following citation:


“For extraordinary heroism as Rifleman, Company I, 3d Battalion, 5th Marines, 1st Marine Division, I Marine Expeditionary Force in support of Operation IRAQI FREEDOM on 4 April 2003. While clearing near Route 6 during the advance into Baghdad, 1st Platoon came under intense enemy fire. As the point man for the lead squad and the most exposed member of the platoon, Lance Corporal Perez came under the majority of these fires.”

Just being the point man for the lead squad and the most exposed member of his intensely under fire platoon advancing into Baghdad warrants some sort of recognition for “extraordinary heroism” in my book. Add to that mix add the fact that he came under the majority of those fires, and you have the kind of stuff of which heroes are made…


“Without hesitation, he continuously employed his M16A4 rifle to destroy the enemy while calmly directing accurate fires for his squad.”

Obviously, being the most exposed and most vulnerable made him also the most alert and most ready to handle the situation. Others may have been easily overwhelmed by the weight of the danger and the uncertainty of the situation, but Lance Corporal Perez was trained, equipped, and empowered to deal with it. Here was a young man who truly exemplified “grace under fire.” Every Marine is a rifleman, but it takes a special breed of warrior to direct (lead) fellow Marines under fire in destroying the enemy.


“He led the charge down a trench destroying the enemy and while closing and under tremendous enemy fire, threw a grenade into a trench that the enemy was occupying. While under a heavy volume of fire, Lance Corporal Perez fired an AT-4 rocket into a machine gun bunker, completely destroying it and killing four enemy personnel. His actions enabled the squad to maneuver safely to the enemy position and seize it.”

Having risen to the occasion, he continued to lead. The presence of mind – Marine Corps defined as “thinking and acting effectively in an unexpected emergency or under periods of prolonged stress – of Lance Corporal Perez was truly remarkable. He was able to employ three different tools of his trade at different times against different targets under incredible stress and got the same results every time – destroyed enemy positions and many dead enemies.

Perez, as point man, set a great example for any leader or follower to emulate. Boldness, competence, initiative, and relentless determination is a tough combination to beat. A good leader will recognize those qualities in subordinates and set them up for success by putting them in situations where those qualities can be used effectively. Navigating through confusion and formidable obstacles takes courage and confidence, and sometimes all it takes is one brave person to enable many others. Those kind of point men are invaluable force-multipliers when effective organizations have the leadership and resources to readily exploit any opportunities uncovered by their point men’s efforts. Perez’ squad was no doubt a truly effective combat organization. Perez made his squad better, and his squad made him better.


“In an effort to link up with 3d Platoon on his platoon's left flank, Lance Corporal Perez continued to destroy enemy combatants with precision rifle fire. As he worked his way to the left, he was hit by enemy fire, sustaining gunshot wounds to his torso and shoulder. Despite being seriously injured, Lance Corporal Perez directed the squad to take cover and gave the squad accurate fire direction to the enemy that enabled the squad to reorganize and destroy the enemy.”

By this point, whatever was left of the enemy must have been wondering, “What does it take to stop this Marine?” The answer clearly was: “More than you have.”

What an inspirational site Lance Corporal Perez must have been for his fellow Marines. Seriously wounded, continuously under fire since first engaged by the enemy, and still out in front of and leading his fellow Marines, he once again enabled his unit to accomplish its mission.


“By his outstanding display of decisive leadership, unlimited courage in the face of heavy enemy fire, and utmost devotion to duty, Lance Corporal Perez reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.”

At any point in this incredible sequence of action, Lance Corporal Perez could have probably let up a bit and let someone else take the point for a bit. Nobody would have questioned his decision given what he had already been through. Yet, he refused to quit. In the face of seemingly impossible odds, he kept on charging forward, making a difference in his life and in the lives of those around him. He led his fellow Marines in intense combat as a junior rifleman, he was the constant target of intense enemy fire, and he was intensely devoted to his mission and his Marines.

The highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service were clearly upheld by another of America’s newest heroes, Joseph B. Perez.

Lt. Col. Matthew Dodd USMC is a Senior Editor of DefenseWatch. He can be reached at mattdodd1775@hotmail.com. Please send Feedback responses to dwfeedback@yahoo.com

yellowwing
09-08-08, 04:34 PM
A blast from the past for you Motivated Poolees!

avenger08
10-09-08, 05:54 AM
that motivates me and it should motivate any poolee joining the marine corps. yall are in for a expirience of a lifetime joining the marines, but dont forget the people that are here back at home supporting you. i lost sight of that and it cost me alot of things. you will make alot of friends and you will meet alot of people, but dont forget the ones that care the most about you. that is your family and loved ones. i regret the things i did but i still remember them to this day. im still an active duty marine but i will never trade the people i met in the corps or even my family back home for a single day out of my beloved corps. marines like lcpl joseph perez are what keep my corps alive, marines like him dont do the things they do just because they want to, they do it because they have to, to make sure the buddies they have next to them stay alive at least one more day to write to their families and tell them that they love them. SEMPER FI to all of the new poolee's that are joining up, dont let anything get in your way to becoming a UNITED STATES MARINE. because if you lose sight of the big picture then you will never make it through, bootcamp is a hard and arduous expirience, you will wish you had never done it but keep on truckin through it because when you receive your eagle globe and anchor you will cry like a baby, because from that day on you are no longer a civilian, or a recruit. you are officially a UNITED STATES MARINE. SEMPER FI, and RAH.