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thedrifter
01-17-03, 09:46 AM
Gulf War Syndrome or Gulf War Illness has been used to describe a collection of chronic signs and symptoms reported by U.S., British, Canadian, Czech, Danish, Saudi, Egyptian, Australian and other Coalition Armed Forces that were deployed to Operation Desert Storm in 1991. Over 100,000 American veterans of Desert Storm /Desert Shield (approximately 15% of deployed U. S. Armed Forces) returned from the Persian Gulf and slowly (6-24 months or more) and presented with a variety of complex signs and symptoms characterized by disabling fatigue, intermittent fevers, night sweats, arthralgia, myalgia, impairments in short-term memory, headaches, skin rashes, intermittent diarrhea, abdominal bloating, chronic bronchitis, photophobia, confusion, transient visual scotomata, irritability and depression and other signs and symptoms that until recently have defied appropriate diagnoses (see publications). These symptoms are not localized to any one organ, and the signs and symptoms and routine laboratory test results are not consistent with a single, specific disease.

Although there is not yet a case definition for Gulf War Illness, the chronic signs and symptoms loosely fit the clinical criteria for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and/or Fibromyalgia Syndrome. Some patients have additionally what appears to be neurotoxicity and brainstem dysfunction that can result in autonomic, cranial and peripheral nerve demyelination, possibly due to complex chemical exposures. Often these patients have been diagnosed with Multiple Chemical Sensitivity Syndrome (MCS) or Organophosphate-Induced Delayed Neurotoxicity (OPIDN). Chemically exposed patients can be treated by removal of offending chemicals from the patient's environment, depletion of chemicals from the patient's system and treatment of the neurotoxic signs and symptoms caused by chemical exposure(s). A rather large subset (~40%) of GWI patients have transmittible infections, including mycoplasmal and possibly other chronic bacterial infections, that have resulted in the appearance of GWI in immediate family members and civilians in the Gulf region. It is likely that veterans of the Gulf War who are ill with GWI owe their illnesses to a variety of exposures: (a) chemical mixtures, primarily organophosphates, antinerve agents and possibly nerve agents, (b) radiological sources, primarily depleted uranium and possibly fallout from destroyed nuclear reactors, and (c) biological sources, primarily bacteria, viruses and toxins, before, during and after the conflict. Such exposures can result in poorly defined chronic illnesses, but these illnesses can be treated if appropriate diagnoses are forthcoming.


http://www.immed.org/illness/gulfwar_illness_research.html



Sempers,

Roger