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NamGrunt68
07-03-02, 12:25 PM
U.S. Servicemen Busted in Drug Probe








AP
Wednesday, July 03, 2002

RALEIGH, N.C. One of the largest military drug investigations in recent years has led to the conviction of more than 80 Marines and sailors at Camp Lejeune for using and selling Ecstasy, cocaine, LSD and methamphetamine.


The two-year, undercover probe resulted in the seizure of more than $1.4 million worth of narcotics and included 105 separate investigations. An additional 99 civilians were charged by civilian authorities.

Code-named Operation Xterminator, the investigation was conducted by the Naval Criminal Investigative Service office at Camp Lejeune, along with state and local authorities.

More details were to be released Wednesday.



FNC
The investigation began in February 2000 after Camp Lejeune officials were alerted that a large number of service members were frequenting clubs about 40 miles south of the camp in Wilmington, where designer drugs were prevalent, according to a statement released by Camp Lejeune.

Drug charges were brought against 84 active-duty service members. A Marine Corps official said most were convicted under the Uniform Code of Military Justice, and two cases are still pending.

Of the 84 charged, 61 were accused of distributing drugs and 23 were accused of using them. Officials provided no information on the sentences meted out to convicted military members.

Under the Uniform Code of Military Justice, the maximum punishment for wrongful distribution of drugs is confinement for 15 years, dishonorable discharge and forfeiture of all pay and allowances. For wrongful use of drugs, the maximum punishment is confinement for five years, dishonorable discharge and forfeiture of all pay and allowances.



FNC
Although narcotics cases in the military are not rare, they usually involve smaller numbers of people.

Thirty-eight cadets out of 4,300 at the Air Force Academy were implicated in a rash of incidents that began in December 2000 and grew to become the biggest drug scandal in the school's 47-year history.

In 1996, the U.S. Naval Academy in Annapolis, Md., went through problems like the Air Force Academy's: Five midshipmen were court-martialed and jailed on drug charges, and 15 others were expelled.

It was not clear Tuesday whether the Marine Corps was planning additional steps to deter use of illicit drugs. Last December, well after Operation Xterminator was under way, the Marine Corps established a random computerized system to standardize urinalysis throughout the service.

Navy regulations require all Marines and sailors to take a urinalysis examination every year.

Marine Corps officials said that while they are concerned by any illicit drug use, the 84 service members charged in the investigation represent only a small percentage of the 50,000 to 60,000 Marines and sailors who served in the Camp Lejeune area during the time of the investigation.

TeufelHunden
07-03-02, 12:28 PM
...They're no longer brothers of mine. 15 years at Leavenworth ain't long enough iffen you ask me. They oughta publically strip 'em of their EGAs, toss 'em in solitary and throw away the key until there's nuthin' left but the smell.

LongShot
07-03-02, 12:35 PM
Thats 84 service members that should have never been Marines. Bunch of serious losers! Should be shot in public and the bodies left to rot in plain view as an example to others. Hope the got the max!

Midnight
07-03-02, 12:40 PM
Back in the day we'd just give'm some brig time then ship they ass over to the navy or army to finish their hitch.

Ploft
07-03-02, 12:50 PM
I agree with Longshot and Teufelhunden only trouble is we now have to pay to keep them locked up and now-a-days that's a big piece of change. How about we send them to Gitmo and lock them up there can't see wastin a good lock-up.

GunsUp
07-03-02, 06:29 PM
I agree on public humiliation for these sorry excuses for marines (notice I lower cased the M).

Reminds me of a time watching one of my dad's formations.

It was 1978 and my dad, new to conventional units (he spent 15 years in SF units) and a new 1st shirt, had recently (with cooperation with CID) with enough evidence to prosecute, caught one of his platoon sgts dealing heroin in the barracks. You have to remember this was the Army of the '70s where average GT score was sixty, drugs were rampant (This is in Germany)... This was the low point for the US military.

Anyway, he has this formation out in the company area. The Bn SGM, the MP 1stSgt, the CO, and the two CID guys are there. He builds up with this great speech on leadership and one of his famous (or infamous) kill a commie speech. Then he works into a semi-flowery (sarcasm) speech on this individual. This guy is standing out there thinking he's about to be promoted or receive some award... Dad calls him to the front of the formation, pulls out and reads off this list of charges on this SOB. This guy's standing at attention when my dad reaches over and tears his chevrons off of his collar, then knocks his cover to the ground (I still feel he was trying to take off his head!) (meanwhile the MPs are now holding this guy, while he stands there in total shock!), strips the unit patch off his shoulder, and finally tears his US ARMY tape off his chest. Then continues on with a speech how things are going to be run in this company and how their whole mission is to kill as many communists before they were pushed into the sea. He went on to tell them about how it was his mission as the 1stSgt to put as many non-hackers and druggies out of the service because someday some of these privates could be NCOs leading his sons in combat. Meanwhile the Bn SGM is about white as a sheet because here he was thinking it was going to be simple arrest of a SNCO, not a drumming out!

Later on he was told by the Bn SGM that what he did was not appropriate but it was worth it in fear factor!!! Needless to say, his was the most combat effective company with the least amount of problems in the 8th Infantry Div.

I'm sure that me and my brother were there for a reason because we grew up to be on the straight and narrow and both became good NCOs in our respective services (My bro's in the Army).

SF

Guns

Sixguns
07-03-02, 06:42 PM
I agree. If the parties were guilty, they should be punished.

What I am curious to know is how many Marines, what ranks, ages and units were involved. This information can be used to help leaders understand who is most at risk to fall into this type of behavior/activity. Those that engaged in the drug activity are being dealt with. My concern as a leader is to prevent others from traveling down that same path.


Sixguns

Arty101
07-03-02, 08:15 PM
This is a very simple post. Lock 'em up, throw away the key.

C:\My Download Files\Police\Animation\key.gif

USMC0311
07-04-02, 12:06 AM
21st Century Marines..hmmmmm.

"Old breed? New breed? There's not a damn bit of difference so long as it's the Marine breed!"

(Lieutenant General Lewis B. Puller)

NamNuts
07-04-02, 07:54 AM
Originally posted by NamGrunt68
U.S. Servicemen Busted in Drug Probe








AP
Wednesday, July 03, 2002

RALEIGH, N.C. One of the largest military drug investigations in recent years has led to the conviction of more than 80 Marines and sailors at Camp Lejeune for using and selling Ecstasy, cocaine, LSD and methamphetamine.


The two-year, undercover probe resulted in the seizure of more than $1.4 million worth of narcotics and included 105 separate investigations. An additional 99 civilians were charged by civilian authorities.

Code-named Operation Xterminator, the investigation was conducted by the Naval Criminal Investigative Service office at Camp Lejeune, along with state and local authorities.

More details were to be released Wednesday.



FNC
The investigation began in February 2000 after Camp Lejeune officials were alerted that a large number of service members were frequenting clubs about 40 miles south of the camp in Wilmington, where designer drugs were prevalent, according to a statement released by Camp Lejeune.

Drug charges were brought against 84 active-duty service members. A Marine Corps official said most were convicted under the Uniform Code of Military Justice, and two cases are still pending.

Of the 84 charged, 61 were accused of distributing drugs and 23 were accused of using them. Officials provided no information on the sentences meted out to convicted military members.

Under the Uniform Code of Military Justice, the maximum punishment for wrongful distribution of drugs is confinement for 15 years, dishonorable discharge and forfeiture of all pay and allowances. For wrongful use of drugs, the maximum punishment is confinement for five years, dishonorable discharge and forfeiture of all pay and allowances.



FNC
Although narcotics cases in the military are not rare, they usually involve smaller numbers of people.

Thirty-eight cadets out of 4,300 at the Air Force Academy were implicated in a rash of incidents that began in December 2000 and grew to become the biggest drug scandal in the school's 47-year history.

In 1996, the U.S. Naval Academy in Annapolis, Md., went through problems like the Air Force Academy's: Five midshipmen were court-martialed and jailed on drug charges, and 15 others were expelled.

It was not clear Tuesday whether the Marine Corps was planning additional steps to deter use of illicit drugs. Last December, well after Operation Xterminator was under way, the Marine Corps established a random computerized system to standardize urinalysis throughout the service.

Navy regulations require all Marines and sailors to take a urinalysis examination every year.

Marine Corps officials said that while they are concerned by any illicit drug use, the 84 service members charged in the investigation represent only a small percentage of the 50,000 to 60,000 Marines and sailors who served in the Camp Lejeune area during the time of the investigation.




UCMJ gonna be worn out on the 2nd MarDiv...General Lejeune and Chesty be waiting for these Jarheads...Squat thrust forever!

Hey Danez...NamNuts here! Made it under the wire...the MP's doain know me here yet ;)

Wherez the club...found the chow hall..no damn coffee WTF over! Damn i'm back ta FNG..even though my skivvies got more TI than a few in this bunker...yep i r an ash!

NamGrunt68
07-04-02, 08:00 AM
Welcome Home and Semper Fi......enjoy postin here bro......I got a feelin you won't be here too long...............so go ahead and get it over with !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! LMMFAO !!!!!!!!!!!!

arzach
07-04-02, 08:32 AM
boot em out! P.C. azzholes deserve whatever they get! just another by-product of our 'permissive society' bros

USMC0311
07-04-02, 08:41 AM
ROGER the permissive society statement Arzach

think we shouldn't condemn our Brothers on Civilian accusations.

Semper Fi, Marines

gemntx
07-04-02, 09:34 AM
As a side note to this story. Of the 84 military members charged, 2 are still in the judicial process. The other 82 have been found guilty! As the article in Jacksonville (NC) Daily News said, "they have not found anyone innocent." You've got to love the military justice system.

Glenn

USMC0311
07-04-02, 09:39 AM
10-4 Major..UCMJ..all the way..price ya pay 2 play.
Semper Fi, Marine!

Barndog
07-04-02, 12:14 PM
Really makes you wonder what happened where doesn't it. Obviously a serious leadership flaw happened somewhere, cause as YOU know when we was in, that didn't happen. It got taken care of right now. But when we were growing up, if you had a problem with someone, you fought it out, last one standing bought the beer. Now, they shoot ya.
I didn't get no stinkin tennis shoes or a baseball games in boot camp either.
Let's start there.

SEMPER FI

Sixguns
07-04-02, 06:27 PM
It might be good to know how many of these Marines required some type of waiver to get into the Corps. In particular, it would be interesting to see how many had drug use prior to service and the extent of their involvement with drugs.

Some of us remember growing up in the Corps in open squadbays. Those living conditions made it much more difficult to conceal such behavior. The Corps has advanced with the times and tried to give many more personal freedoms to Marines. In doing so, we may have facilitated this type of behavior. I remember living in a squadbay. It was dificult to not know what was happening with the Marines that shared that space. With barracks rooms that allow individuals to close their doors and separate themselves from the group, they can also in a sense shut their doors to conceal their private plans. I'm not saying we need to go back to squadbays, but there was an advantage to having no walls as a barrier to learn of a Marine who may be going astray. As leaders, we need to be cognizant of this situation today and get more involved with how our Marines use their liberty.

Sixguns

LadyLeatherneck
07-05-02, 11:30 AM
I agree with you Six. We had a devil dog in our shop who would
come in the morning so damn hyper and by 1100 he was falling
asleep at his desk. He'd sleep through lunch time on a couch
we had in the shop. We'd tell the Gunny something wasn't
right about him, but the Gunny would say that it was because
he had a newborn at home, but heck, I had a new born at home
and I wasn't sleeping THAT much. Well low and behold 2 months
later he pops positive on the pee pee test.....hello Big Chicken Dinner!
He came back in the shop wearing a very trendy ORANGE suit
and some nice metal things on his wrist...LMAO!!! Working
as an SRB clerk I saw way too many Marines with drug waivers
and many Marines get office hours for using drugs. I was typing
page 12's atleast once every 2 weeks for someone using drugs.

TeufelHunden
07-05-02, 11:46 AM
...So I'm not sure if it's been addressed already. I wonder where the leaders of these Ex-Marines where while they were hitting the rave clubs up in Wilmington? I know Marine NCOs, SNCOs and Officers are not babysitters, and can not be expected to babysit grown men and women 24/7. But, you have to wonder where the breakdown in instilling our Core Values started. I mean, this investigation was going for 2 years! Certainly there were signs/clues that were missed, that shoulda been caught by their leaders.

I was a CG drug waiver myself. The moment I walked into the Recruiters office, I stopped doing what I had been doing that required the waiver. I knew, that if I wanted to accomplish my goal of becoming a Marine, that drugs could never be in the picture.

Have any of you active duty brother or sister Marines seen the statistics of the bust? I wonder how many ex-Marine NCOs were involved?

USMC0311
07-05-02, 12:02 PM
I was lucky Little Brothers... ALL the Marines I knew. never knew what the RUSH drugs were.. We drank and screwed..All American Boys :)... Do Know if it is not eliminated it will destroy Our Corps
"Birds of a Feather Flock together"

Semper Fi, Marines