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wrbones
11-03-02, 11:40 AM
http://www.mcrdpi.usmc.mil/

If you put USMC recruit training on yer google search engine, ya come up with 10,900 references.

Here's another one.

http://www.marinemail.com/training_info.htm


and one more.

http://www.tecom.usmc.mil/gtb/General%20Training%20Directives/MCO%201510_32C%20Recruit%20Training.pdf


More

http://www.lifelines2000.org/communities/extfam/index.asp





Enjoy!

wrbones
11-03-02, 11:41 AM
http://www.mcrdsd.usmc.mil/freqAskQuest.htm



http://www.usmcgradsandiego.org/clothing.shtml

wrbones
11-03-02, 11:46 AM
Core Values of The United States Marine Corps

Date signed: 12/16/96 ALMAR Number: 439/96
R 161100Z DEC 96 ZYB
FM CMC WASHINGTON DC//CMC//
TO ALMAR
BT
UNCLAS //N05000//
ALMAR 439/96
MSGID/GENADMIN/CG MCCDC QUANTICO VA//
SUBJ/IMPLEMENTING INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE MARINE CORPS VALUES PROGRAM//
REF/A/CMC WHITE LTR 16-96/-/-//
REF/B/MCO 1500 OF 13DEC 96/-/-//
RMKS/1. HONOR... COURAGE... COMMITMENT... CORE VALUES INSTILLED IN
EVERY MARINE. INSTILLING VALUES IS AN INTEGRAL PART OF MAKING
MARINES AND, AS A COMPONENT OF READINESS, IS ESSENTIAL TO
WINNING BATTLES. CORE VALUES INCULCATION BEGINS WITH THE FIRST
CONTACT A POTENTIAL MARINE HAS WITH A RECRUITER, IS DRIVEN HOME
FROM THE VERY FIRST EYEBALL-TO-EYEBALL EXPERIENCE WITH A DRILL
INSTRUCTOR AT OFFICER CANDIDATES SCHOOL OR RECRUIT TRAINING, AND
CONTINUES THROUGHOUT THE COURSE OF A MARINE'S CAREER -- BE IT 3
OR 30 YEARS. SEMPER FIDELIS... THE MARINE'S PLEDGE TO REMAIN ALWAYS
FAITHFUL TO THESE VALUES AND TO GOD, FAMILY, COUNTRY, CORPS. OUR
CORE VALUES REMAIN THE VERY SOUL OF OUR INSTITUTION, UNDERLYING ALL
THAT IS BEST IN MARINES, AND MUST CONTINUE TO FRAME THE WAY WE LIVE
AND ACT AS MARINES.


2. TWENTY-FIVE YEARS AGO THE LEADERSHIP OF OUR CORPS REAFFIRMED THE
CORE TENETS THAT HAVE DEFINED WHAT IT HAS MEANT TO BE A MARINE
SINCE 1775. THERE WAS A RECRUITING POSTER THAT SAID, "MARINES MAKE
MEN--BODY, MIND, SPIRIT." TODAY, AS THEN, ONE OF THE TWO MOST
IMPORTANT THINGS WE DO AS A CORPS IS "MAKE MARINES." IN THE 1970'S
WE ENHANCED THE PHYSICAL FITNESS AND PERSONAL APPEARANCE OF MARINES
AND WORKED TO ELIMINATE DRUG ABUSE. THE 1980'S AND 1990'S BROUGHT
REINVIGORATED PROFESSIONAL MILITARY EDUCATION, A FORMAL READING
PROGRAM, AND THE MARINE CORPS UNIVERSITY. TODAY WE WILL DEDICATE
OURSELVES TO IMPROVING AND ENHANCING EVERY MARINE'S DEVOTION TO THE
VALUES OF HONOR, COURAGE, AND COMMITMENT THAT HAVE BEEN THE HALLMARK
OF MARINES SINCE THE FOUNDING OF OUR NATION.


3. SINCE BECOMING THE 31ST COMMANDANT, I HAVE BEEN TALKING AND
WRITING TO MARINES AROUND THE WORLD ABOUT THE IMPORTANCE OF OUR
MARINE CORPS CORE VALUES. TO FORMALIZE THOSE THOUGHTS, I
RECENTLY SIGNED A MARINE CORPS ORDER AND WHITE LETTER FORMALLY
IMPLEMENTING THE MARINE CORPS VALUES PROGRAM. TOGETHER, THESE
DOCUMENTS OUTLINE AN APPROACH FOR STRENGTHENING THE TEACHING AND
INCULCATION OF OUR CORE VALUES OF HONOR, COURAGE, AND COMMITMENT
IN EVERY MARINE. THE MCO OUTLINES THREE PHASES OF VALUES
TRAINING AND EDUCATION THAT ENCOMPASS A MARINE'S ENTIRE CAREER.
PHASE I VALUES TRAINING OCCURS DURING INITIAL ENTRY TRAINING AT
THE RECRUIT DEPOTS, OFFICER CANDIDATES SCHOOL, AND THE BASIC SCHOOL.
PHASE II IS REINFORCEMENT EDUCATION AND HAPPENS AT EVERY SCHOOL A
MARINE ATTENDS FROM MCT/SOI AND MOS PRODUCING SCHOOLS TO THE SNCO
ADVANCED COURSE AND THE MARINE CORPS WAR COLLEGE. PHASE III
SUSTAINMENT EDUCATION TAKES PLACE IN EVERY MARINE UNIT AND IS THE
MOST CRITICAL TO ACHIEVING THE AIMS OF THE VALUES PROGRAM. BOTH THE
MCO AND THE WHITE LETTER STRESS THE RESPONSIBILITIES OF COMMANDERS
IN ENSURING THE SUCCESS OF THE PROGRAM.


4. TO ASSIST COMMANDERS AT ALL LEVELS IN IMPLEMENTING THIS
PROGRAM, SEVERAL TOOLS WILL BE MADE AVAILABLE. A KEY COMPONENT
OF OUR EFFORT TO STRENGTHEN AND SUSTAIN OUR VALUES IS THE MARINE
CORPS VALUES CARD. THE CARD WILL SERVE ALL MARINES AS A
TOUCHSTONE DURING TIMES OF UNCERTAINTY -- A LINK TO OUR PAST AND
A CONSTANT REMINDER OF DEDICATION TO OUR CORE VALUES. DEPICTING
THE MARINE CORPS COLOR ON ONE SIDE AND THE AMERICAN FLAG ON THE
OTHER, THE CARD HIGHLIGHTS OUR CORE VALUES AND DESCRIBES OUR
ETHOS. IT CONTAINS A PLACE FOR EACH MARINE TO SIGN HIS OR HER
NAME AS A VISIBLE DEMONSTRATION OF THEIR INDIVIDUAL COMMITMENT
TO OUR MARINE CORPS VALUES.


5. EVERY MARINE SHOULD HAVE THE MARINE CORPS VALUES CARD IN HIS
OR HER POSSESSION AT ALL TIMES, JUST AS THEY CARRY THEIR
IDENTIFICATION CARDS AND WEAR THEIR IDENTIFICATION TAGS. THE
CARD IS A DAILY REMINDER THAT THEY JOINED A CORPS OF DEDICATED
PROFESSIONALS FOR WHOM HONOR, COURAGE, AND COMMITMENT ARE A WAY
OF LIFE.


6. STARTING IN DECEMBER 1996, WE WILL BEGIN TO PRESENT THE CARD
AT RECRUIT DEPOTS AND OFFICER CANDIDATES SCHOOL. THE
PRESENTATIONS WILL OCCUR FOLLOWING THE "CRUCIBLE" EVENT AT AN
APPROPRIATE CEREMONY IN CONJUNCTION WITH THE COMMANDANT'S VIDEO
AND THE WARRIOR MEAL.


7. DURING THE 1ST QUARTER OF CY 97, WE WILL PROVIDE ALL
COMMANDERS VALUES CARDS FOR EVERY MARINE IN THEIR UNIT.
COMMANDERS WILL RECEIVE AN INITIAL ALLOCATION OF CARDS THAT
EXCEEDS THEIR TABLE OF ORGANIZATION TO COVER LOST CARDS AND
MARINES IN TRANSIT. FOLLOWING THIS INITIAL ALLOCATION,
COMMANDERS MUST REORDER CARDS THROUGH THE SUPPLY SYSTEM.
COMMANDERS WILL PRESENT THE CARDS TO THEIR MARINES AT AN APPROPRIATE
UNIT CEREMONY, E.G. FOLLOWING A SIGNIFICANT UNIT EVENT SUCH AS A
HIKE, FIELD MEET, FIELD TRAINING EXERCISE, OR OTHER SUITABLE
EVENT THAT SERVES TO HIGHLIGHT OUR COMMITMENT AND DEDICATION.
EVERY MARINE MUST UNDERSTAND AND APPRECIATE THEIR COMMITMENT AND
DEDICATION TO OUR CORE VALUES OF HONOR, COURAGE, AND COMMITMENT
WHICH SIGNING THE CARD SIGNIFIES. THE MARINE CORPS VALUES CARD
WILL ENHANCE EVERY MARINE'S UNDERSTANDING OF THE NATURE AND
RESPONSIBILITIES OF OUR PROFESSION AND THE DEPTH OF OBLIGATION
WE EACH ACCEPT AS UNITED STATES MARINES.


8. THE "MARINE CORPS VALUES AND LEADERSHIP USER'S GUIDE FOR
DISCUSSION LEADERS" WILL BE AVAILABLE THROUGHOUT THE CORPS IN
MID DECEMBER 1996. THE 24 CHAPTERS IN THE GUIDE CONTAIN
VALUABLE INFORMATION ABOUT A RANGE OF SUBJECTS THAT DEAL WITH
VALUES, LEADERSHIP, AND RELATED ISSUES. THE GUIDE IS MEANT TO BE
USED AS A POINT OF DEPARTURE FOR PREPARING LESSON PLANS AND
CONDUCTING SMALL UNIT DISCUSSIONS ABOUT VALUES AND LEADERSHIP
TOPICS. MARINES WILL MORE READILY "INTERNALIZE" THESE LESSONS
AFTER DISCUSSIONS WITH THEIR PEERS AND LEADERS WITHIN THEIR
CHAIN OF COMMAND. THE GUIDE WILL BE AVAILABLE IN PAPER COPIES
AT THE COMPANY AND DETACHMENT LEVEL AND BY ELECTRONIC MEANS.
THE ELECTRONIC FILE CAN BE DOWNLOADED AS A SELF-EXTRACTING ZIP
FILE FROM THE MARINE CORPS UNIVERSITY HOME PAGE ON THE INTERNET AT
ADDRESS HTTP:WWW-MCU.MQG.USMC.MIL. THE GUIDE IS IN AMIPRO 3.0
FORMAT. THE GUIDE WILL BECOME A MARINE CORPS REFERENCE PUBLICATION
DURING THE FOURTH QUARTER FY 97 AND WILL BE AVAILABLE FOR REORDER
VIA THE MARINE CORPS PUBLICATIONS DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM (MCPDS).


9. IN ADDITION TO THE COMMANDANT'S WARRIOR VIDEO THAT WILL BE
SHOWN TO ALL RECRUITS AT THE END OF THEIR CRUCIBLE EVENT, ANOTHER
VIDEO WILL BE AVAILABLE FEATURING THE COMMANDANT DISCUSSING THE
MARINE CORPS VALUES PROGRAM. THIS VIDEO WILL BE DISTRIBUTED TO LOCAL
TRAINING AND AUDIO/VISUAL SERVICE CENTERS AND WILL BE AVAILABLE FOR
LOCAL REPRODUCTION DURING THE 3RD QTR OF FY 97.


10. ONE OF THE MOST IMPORTANT THINGS WE CAN DO FOR OUR NATION IS
CONTINUE TO MAKE MARINES OF GOOD CHARACTER WHO RETURN TO THEIR
HOMES AND FAMILIES AS BETTER CITIZENS AND PEOPLE THAN THEY WERE
WHEN THEY LEFT TO JOIN THE CORPS. SEMPER FIDELIS, C.C. KRULAK,
COMMANDANT OF THE MARINE CORPS.//
BT

wrbones
11-03-02, 11:47 AM
USMC Martial Arts Program is more than punching, kicking
PFC Thomas Perry
Boot Staff

The Marine Corps Martial Arts Program combines 10 martial arts into a three-discipline training system designed to sharpen the mind and body.

General James L. Jones, Commandant of the Marine Corps, initiated the program in 1999 because he believed the current program did not meet the need of anticipated 21st century conflicts. He wanted more non-lethal techniques available for humanitarian and peacekeeping missions when deadly force was not authorized.

Two hours of the martial arts training will soon be a mandatory part of active-duty physical training, according GySgt. Joseph Scott, a Marine Corps close combat instructor.

"Marines have three to five mandatory hours of PT a week," said Scott. "Soon two of those hours will be spent on martial arts training."

The program, which is relatively new to the Depot, involves mental, physical and character discipline.

The mental aspect of training is intended to create a smarter Marine capable of decision making under any condition from combat to liberty.

"The mental training includes PMI's (professional military instruction), the commandant's reading list, and the study of past and present warfare techniques," said Scott.

The physical training is composed of both lethal and non-lethal tactics including weapons and unarmed styles.

"The physical training builds combat toughness and physical endurance," said Scott.

The character aspect of training involves core values and leadership training aimed at adding to the mental toughness Marines gain in recruit training.

"The mental aspect builds esprit de Corps and a Warrior Spirit that is needed for success in combat," said Scott.

It will be mandatory, and will benefit even the experienced martial artist.

According to Scott, the program was developed by martial arts subject matter experts. So even Marines with a martial arts background can gain from the training.

If a Marine is lacking in any of the mental, physical or character disciplines, he can have 20 years martial arts training and still have much to learn from this program, said Scott.

For more information on the Marine Corps Martial Arts Program call 228-2826.

wrbones
11-03-02, 11:48 AM
Boot Camp Through the Eyes of a Recruit

Michael's Boot page




From a collection of U.S. Marine Corps articles and stories from Sgt. Grit. If you're a USMC marine, this is the place to be Boot Camp . . . through the eyes of a recruit by Don J. Flickinger Sgt. USMC Recruit Training, United States Marine Corps, officially comprises three definitive phases. First Phase concentrates on orientation, study of military subjects and physical training. Second Phase includes marksmanship training, combat exercises and long hikes. Third Phase is service week, final polishing and, finally, graduation. Three phases also exist in the mind of the recruit. These are not, however, the same three phases measured by exact dates in the drill instructor's schedule. Phase one begins in the small, dark hours of the morning. The former happy civilian steps off the bus into a world of disorientation. His mind is snapped into abject shock. Cardiac arrest is a distinct possibility. The drill instructor is absolutely the most sadistic, maniacal tyrant he has ever encountered. It is beyond comprehension that one human being could treat another in such fashion. In his daily struggle to survive, the recruit becomes psychoneurotic wondering if the psychopath in charge will allow him to live another day. The days pass. The crying in the sack at night subsides as the mind becomes numb and the spent, weary body literally dies. Forgotten are the lofty principles and goals that fired enlistment. Graduation is not a word in the vocabulary. The recruit lives in limbo, a lethean existence. One night after lights out, the recruit lies on his rack contemplating "the worst mistake I ever made in my life." The body and the mind have reached the limits of endurance. Slowly, he begins to make a decision. Initially, his thoughts are that he cannot continue another day. If that is the end of the thinking process, he sinks into despair will soon be released to return home. Continued thinking, however, brings the drill instructor into focus. Anger begins to rage within the recruit. Further thought heightens the wrath within to a frenzy. The irrevocable decision is made, "I will not let that son-of-a ***** defeat me." Second phase begins the next morning at roll call. The recruit responds in a voice that is sharp and quick, loud and distinct, and permeated with a tone of defiance. On the parade deck his movements suddenly become snappy, displaying a newly found arrogance. Despite the aching body, his physical training scores shoot upwardly. The recruit has engaged the drill instructor in a mental duel. He is determined that he will excel and that the drill instructor will never again single him out. Yet, as he struggles it seems that the drill instructor is answering the challenge and singles him out with continuously accelerating the demands ever increasing expectations. With grim determination, the recruit rises to the challenge. One day the recruit is astonished with the sudden realization that he has executed a command, perfectly and with relative ease. His mind engages in further introspection. He notices the transformation of mind and body. Gone is the deep-seated defiance, replaced with absolute confidence. He has achieved the "can do!" attitude, which he will have for the rest of his life. Third Phase has begun. The recruit now struts, proud and tall. Graduation, wearing the Eagle, Globe and Anchor, and being awarded the title "Marine" are realities. He minimizes his own participation. All credit is given to the drill instructor. All earlier attitudes give way to one of genuine deep respect and hero worship. "If I ever go into combat, I want him as the leader." The former civilian will be forever a Marine and the drill instructor will live within his mind. On 16 April 1954, I proudly strutted across the Parade Deck, Marine Corps Recruit Depot, Parris Island, South Carolina, having earned the title, "United States Marine." Again, on 20 May 1994, I strutted, with even greater pride, across the Parade Deck, Marine Corps Recruit Depot, San Diego, California, coming from the reviewing stand, in uniform, after the ceremonies, to welcome my son to the "Band of Brothers." The mental phases of training as perceived in the mind of the recruit are based upon my own impressions and reflections from the time. They were confirmed by my son's Senior Drill Instructor. He further indicated that the phases are imposed by design and that the drill instructor is acutely aware of the current mental phase of each recruit.

wrbones
11-03-02, 11:51 AM
http://usmilitary.about.com/cs/marinejoin/

wrbones
11-03-02, 01:15 PM
Updated: 12 Jan 1999



Rite of Passage: Making Basic Training Tougher


By Jim Garamone

American Forces Press Service


Note to visitors: This is part of a three-story series. Here's the
full Web
version, or visit the DoD home page, www.defenselink.mil.

PARRIS ISLAND, S.C. -- Make basic training tougher. This is the
challenge given to the military services by Defense Secretary
William S. Cohen.

But what does "tough" mean? Is it just physical toughness or does
mental toughness also come into play? What about military skills
and the ability to operate in a tough, unforgiving combat
environment? At what point in basic training do recruits finally
prove they are tough, that they are ready, that they belong?

All the services struggle with these questions. The answers they
have come up with in their basic training programs reflect their
service-unique roles and missions. All, however, agree that basic
training is more than a physical challenge: It is a journey that
young civilian men and women take to become soldiers, sailors,
airmen and Marines. It is a rite of passage.

For the Army and Marines, the essence of this passage from one
world to another comes into razor-sharp focus in a final gut-check
field exercise that each of their recruits must face and overcome.
The Marines call this last challenge the "Crucible; for the Army,
it is "Victory Forge." In military terms, these trials of
toughness are simply referred to as culminating events.

To see these culminating events, the Press Service visited the
Marines at Parris Island and the Army at Fort Jackson, S.C. The
installations are little more than 100 miles apart -- Fort Jackson
in the upcountry scrub pine, Parris Island on the coast -- but
each service brings its distinct mission and ethos to these rites
of passage. These service distinctions are overshadowed, however,
by what the "Crucible" and "Victory Forge" have in common. They
are tough. Real tough.

The Crucible

"We have two missions in the Marine Corps -- to win battles and
make Marines," said Col. Bob Hayes, assistant deputy chief of
staff for operations and training at the recruit depot here. "The
Crucible is one piece of that effort."

The Crucible emphasizes trainee teamwork under stress. "Recruits
get eight hours of sleep during the entire 54-hour exercise," said
Sgt. Roger Summers, a Delta Company drill instructor in the 1st
Recruit Training Battalion at Parris Island. "They get two-and-a-
half MREs and they are responsible for rationing out the food to
themselves. Then we put them through tough physical activities
like road marches and night infiltration courses. They march about
40 miles in those 54 hours."

It isn't long before the recruits are tired and hungry, Summers
said, but as they keep going they realize they can call on
reserves they never knew they had.

"Some of these recruits do things they never thought they could
do," he said. "Some of them come from middle-class homes where
everything has been handed to them. Others come from poorer homes
where nothing was ever expected of them. If they finish the
Crucible, they have accomplished something."

One recruit put it best. "I am going to finish this," he said.
"And when I do, it will be the most positive thing I have done in
my life." Delta Company begins the Crucible at 3 a.m. with a six-
mile road march from their barracks to Page Airfield, the Crucible
site.

Once there, recruits -- and that's the only thing the drill
instructors call the trainees -- place their gear in huts and
prepare for the first of four four-hour events.

Each event has a number of "warrior stations" that the team of
recruits must work together to overcome or solve. Each station is
named for a Marine hero and the drill instructor has a recruit
read a brief explanation of how the hero's actions exemplify the
Corps and its values.

"I choose a different leader for each station. That way, all the
recruits understand what it's like to be the leader and what they
have to do to be a follower," Summers said. "For some of them,
they want to run everything. They can't admit that a recruit who
may not have been the sharpest in previous training has a good
idea. Sometimes it's the quiet one who has the idea and no one
will listen.

"You see the team learn as they go along," he continued. "At the
beginning, they just charge ahead without a plan and without
asking if anyone has an idea. By the end of the Crucible you see
them working together better, getting advice from all team members
and solving more of the problems."

One warrior station, for example, is built around an enemy-mined
rope bridge that the recruits must cross with their gear and
ammunition boxes. They have only a couple of short ropes and their
personal gear to solve the problem. At another event, recruits run
into firing positions and engage pop-up targets with 10 rounds in
two magazines. Recruit teams battle each other with pugil sticks
in yet another event.

The recruits grab food and water when they can. After the first
two events comes a five-mile night march. "The night march was the
toughest thing we've done here," said 18-year-old Pfc. Josh
Lunceford of Charleston, W.Va. "The whole company went on it and
whoever led it set a real fast pace. You couldn't see very well
and people were tripping over stuff, and everyone was tired."

The recruits hit the rack for four hours of sleep, then begin
another day and finish the final two events. "On the second day
they are tired and hungry and it really starts to show," said
Capt. John H. Rochford, Delta Company commander. "They start
getting short with one another, but they realize after the first
day they have to work together to finish. No one gets through the
Crucible alone."

At the end of the second day, the recruits go through a night
infiltration course and then hit the rack for another four hours.
When they get up, they face a nine-mile march and the end of the
Crucible.

wrbones
11-03-02, 01:16 PM
The march begins at 4 a.m. and, at first, is done quietly.
Recruits limp along, because no one wants to drop out this close
to the end, Summers said.

As the sun rises, the recruits cross DI Bridge. Once across, the
drill instructors start Jody calls and the recruits join in. As
they get closer to the main base, the Jody calls get louder until
they reach the Parade Deck. The recruits form up around a half-
size replica of the Marine Corps Memorial -- also known as the Iwo
Jima Memorial. There, a significant transformation takes place.

"We're not just giving them basic training, we're turning them
into Marines," Rochford said. "There's more to being a Marine than
knowing how to fire a weapon. There's a whole tradition behind it,
and we want these recruits to measure up to the men and women who
went before them."

A color guard raises the flag on the memorial. The chaplain reads
a prayer specifically written for the finish of the Crucible, and
the company first sergeant addresses the recruits. Then the drill
instructors present each of their recruits with the Marine Corps
insignia -- the eagle, globe and anchor. He shakes their hands and
calls them "Marine" for the first time. Many accept the honor with
tears streaming down their faces.

Victory Forge

The Army took the Crucible and changed it in ways to suit their
needs. At Fort Jackson, Victory Forge was the result. "All Army
basic training sites have a culminating event like Victory Forge,"
said Army Maj. Gen. John A. Van Alstyne, commander of Fort
Jackson.

Basic at Jackson once climaxed with a classic field training
exercise. "I got here in July 1997 and I took a look at the FTX.
It became clear to me we needed to do a lot of work," he said.
"The recruits were bused out to a point, there was a short road
march and then they went into an area and established positions.
Drill sergeants referred to it as a 'Dig-X.' In other words, they
did more digging than anything else."

Van Alstyne and his planners visited Parris Island's Crucible. He
said they changed it to fit their situation. Victory Forge starts
with a 10-kilometer march out and lasts 72 hours in a tactical
environment. Though Marine recruits carry weapons during the
Crucible, their environment is one of training.

The general gathered his brigade and battalion commanders and
drill sergeants and charged them: Implement Victory Forge and make
it the high point of basic combat training. The result is a
combination of team-building events and tactical lanes. "We wanted
to finish with a night infiltration course and a long road march
on the way home," Van Alstyne said. The final march started at 12
kilometers, but now averages 15.

"Soldiers now feel like they are pushed both physically and
mentally, and they are proud of what they have done," he said.
Training companies, he added, routinely come out of Victory Forge
looking like rifle platoons that just finished two days of combat
operations.

Victory Forge ends at night, and the soldiers gather around a
forge. Flames spew from the top as the battalion commander puts
the soldiers' experiences into perspective. He holds up a rod of
iron and likens it to them when they arrived at Fort Jackson --
metal with a lot of potential but unshaped. But then, he says,
they went through the fires of Victory Forge. And as he speaks, he
reaches into the forge and pulls out a sword.

Then the drill sergeants go down the line and congratulate the
soldiers. "When the drill sergeants walk down the line and tell
[the soldiers] they've 'done good,' many of them break down," Van
Alstyne said. "They are being told this by someone they really
respect. It means a lot to them."


A soldier back-crawls under barbed wire during Victory Forge exercises at Fort Jackson, S.C. Victory Forge is the culminating event of Army basic training at Jackson. Lance Cpl. Michael J. Supples, USMC
A recruit delivers a killing blow while running the bayonet course at Parris Island Marine Corps Recruit Depot, S.C. The recruit was in the middle of the Crucible, the 54-hour-long climax of Marine basic training. Lance Cpl. Michael J. Supples, USMC
Delta Company recruits rumble during pugil stick competitions at Parris Island Marine Recruit Depot, S.C. The competitions are part of the Crucible, the 54-hour-long climax of Marine basic training. Lance Cpl. Michael J. Supples, USMC
Teamwork gets a soldier over the wall during Victory Forge exercises at Fort Jackson, S.C. The 72-hour tactical exercise climaxes Army basic training at Jackson. Lance Cpl. Michael J. Supples, USMC
Recruits drag a "wounded" teammate at the infiltration course at Parris Island Marine Recruit Depot, S.C. Lance Cpl. Michael J. Supples, USMC

wrbones
11-03-02, 01:27 PM
It has been said time and time again by former Marines that Marine Corps Recruit Training was the most difficult thing they ever had to do in their entire lives. In order to train the world's most elite fighting force, it has to be that way.

Upon arrival at Parris Island, a new recruit begins a virtually non-stop journey, the end of which results in the transformation of that recruit into a new Marine.


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Recruit Receiving

The first stop is at Recruit Receiving, where new recruits spend the first few days of their recruit training experience. Here they will receive their first haircut and their initial gear issue, which includes items like uniforms, toiletries and letter writing supplies. During this time recruits will also be given a full medical and dental screening, meet their senior drill instructor, and take the Initial Strength Test. This test consists of a one and a half mile run, sit-ups and pull-ups and tests recruits to see if they're in shape to begin training.


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Forming

Forming is the period when recruits are taken to their training companies and they "meet" their drill instructors for the first time. During Forming's 3-5 days, recruits learn the basics, like how to march, how to wear their uniform, how to secure their weapon, etc. This period of time allows recruits to somewhat adjust to the recruit training way of life before the first actual training day.



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Drill

Drill is the basic way in which platoons march and move from place to place. At first, recruits will practice just staying in step with the rest of the platoon and the drill instructor. However, as training continues, the platoon becomes a well-oiled machine performing synchronous, complex drill movements. During recruit training, platoons will also compete in two drill competitions. Drill is mainly used to instill discipline, team pride and unit cohesion.



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Physical Training

Physical Training or just "PT" as it is often called, comes in many forms on Parris Island. Recruit Training uses a progressive physical training program, which builds up recruits to Marine Corps standards. Recruits will experience Table PT, a period of training in which a drill instructor leads several platoons through a series of demanding exercises while he stands on a padded table. Recruits will also run, either individually or as a platoon or squad. Other PT consists of obstacle courses, circuit courses or 3-, 5- or 10-mile conditioning marches.


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Academic Training

Recruits will also exercise their minds through academics training. Ranging in subjects from Marine Corps history, Marine customs and courtesies and basic lifesaving procedures. Recruits will also take an academic test while in recruit training.


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Core Values

The Corps' Core Values are Honor, Courage and Commitment, and these values make up the bedrock of a Marine's character. During recruit training, recruits are taught these Core Values and the numerous others attached to them, such as integrity, discipline, teamwork, duty and esprit de Corps. Drill instructors, recruit training officers and Navy chaplains teach specific Core Values classes, but drill instructors also talk one-on-one with recruits after other training events to see what values were learned and how they affect the recruits. For example, a drill instructor might talk about overcoming fears after rappelling or not giving up after a long march.


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Close Combat

The Close Combat Training Program consists of fighting techniques recruits may need to use to survive in combat. These include pugil sticks, the practical application of bayonet fighting, and an offensive and defensive skills training program. All close combat instructors are drill instructors and have been certified to teach close combat.



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Confidence Course

The Confidence Course is an 11-station obstacle course that helps recruits build confidence as well as upper-body strength. Recruits will tackle this course twice while on Parris Island.


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Combat Water Survival

Training in Combat Water Survival develops a recruit's confidence in the water. All recruits must pass the minimum requirement level of Combat Water Survival-4, which requires recruits to perform a variety of water survival and swimming techniques. If a recruit meets the CWS-4 requirements, he or she may upgrade to a higher level. All recruits train in the camouflage utility uniform, but those upgrading may be required to train in full combat gear, which includes a rifle, helmet, flak jacket and pack.


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Basic Warrior Training

Basic Warrior Training introduces recruits to field living and conditions. The majority of a Marine's field training is conducted after recruit training. During the 3-day Basic Warrior Training, recruits will learn basic field skills from just setting up a tent to field sanitation and camouflage. It is also during this training that recruits will descend the rappel tower and go through the gas chamber.


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Marksmanship Training

Marksmanship training teaches recruits the fundamentals of marksmanship with their M-16A2 service rifle. This training takes place over two weeks, the first of which is called Snap-In Week. During this week, recruits are introduced to the four shooting positions (standing, kneeling, sitting and prone) and a Primary Marksmanship Instructor shows recruits how to fire, how to adjust their sights, how to take into account the effects of the weather, etc. Recruits also have the opportunity to fire on the Indoor Simulated Marksmanship Training machine. During the second week of marksmanship training, recruits actually fire a known-distance course. With ranges of 200, 300 and 500 yards, recruits prepare for rifle qualification on Friday of that week.


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Field Meet

The field meet is a chance for recruits to have some fun and compete against other platoons in their company in a variety of physical events, such as the tug-of-war and relay races. This event also helps build teamwork and unit cohesion.


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A-line

A-line is a portion of training devoted to firing weapons in a field condition. During marksmanship training, recruits learn how to fire at a single target while in a stationary position. During A-line recruits learn how to fire at moving and multiple targets, while under low-light conditions and wearing their field protective mask (gas mask).


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Transformation Week

Transformation Week is the last week the recruits will be addressed as recruits. By the end of the week they will have claimed the title "Marine." The week builds up to the early Thursday morning start of The Crucible, the final test of recruits.


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The Crucible

The Crucible is Recruit Training's defining moment.


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Transition Week

Transition Week is the last week the brand new Marines spend on Parris Island. During this week, more responsibility is given to the privates and privates first class and the supervision from the drill instructors is decreased. In fact, drill instructors don't wear their duty belts during this time and the new Marines call them by their rank, not as "sir" or "ma'am." This week helps these new Marines adjust from being a recruit to being a Marine.


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Family Day & Graduation

Family Day and Graduation take place on the last two days while on Parris Island. Family Day gives new Marines a chance to see their family and friends for the first time during on-base liberty.Graduation follows the next morning with a formal ceremony and parade on the Peatross Parade Deck.

wrbones
11-03-02, 01:34 PM
There's a boatload more info out there! If yer havin' trouble findin' stuff, don't be afraid to ask, just make sure ya try first! LOL.

All the stuff I've posted on this thread I found in just a few minutes without lookin' hard!

wrbones
11-07-02, 12:13 PM
http://www.lifelines2000.org/services/articles/20020729/100413.asp?RootID=439

wrbones
11-07-02, 12:15 PM
One about DI's.


http://difrompi.freeservers.com/

wrbones
11-07-02, 12:18 PM
http://1stbattalion3rdmarines.com/boot-camp/usmc_recruit_training.htm

wrbones
11-07-02, 12:21 PM
http://usmilitary.about.com/cs/marinejoin/

wrbones
11-07-02, 12:25 PM
http://www.geocities.com/Pentagon/Barracks/1713/family.html


one for the family about graduation from boot

http://www.usmcgradsandiego.org/airlines.shtml

wrbones
11-07-02, 12:30 PM
http://www.militarywoman.org/bootcamp.htm


scroll down the page a bit

wrbones
11-07-02, 12:35 PM
http://www.grunt.com/eyesofrecruit.htm

wrbones
11-07-02, 12:40 PM
http://gunnydi.tripod.com/mcrdparrisisland/id16.html

wrbones
11-07-02, 02:06 PM
http://www.parrisisland.com/the_boot/story1.html

wrbones
11-15-02, 05:25 PM
http://www.dandfoutfitters.com/catalog/items/item347.htm

wrbones
11-17-02, 01:01 PM
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/mymarine/messages/


Interesting what ya find when ya lookin' fer somethin' else, ain't it!

wrbones
12-05-02, 11:34 PM
http://www.marines.com/

AKAMarine23
12-23-02, 06:40 PM
Warren, you should be a Recruiter. You have answered more questions I ve asked then my own recruiter. Thanks for all the help and motivation.

wrbones
12-23-02, 07:45 PM
Thank you, darlin'. I do what I can, but those fellers are more up to date than I am! Hell, it's been twenty-six years since I stood in those yeller footprints! LOL>

Do yer research, ask questions, but always go to yer recruiter fer the latest scoop, would ya! ;)

Good luck!