PDA

View Full Version : WW2 Songs 1943



cadetat6
12-31-04, 01:22 PM
SONGS OF 1943
FIRST PLACE SONGS - (TOTAL WEEKS)
BRAZIL
1939 "Aquarella do Brasil", Portuguese words and music by
Ary Barroso; English words by S.K. Russell (1942).
1943 introduced by Eddie Duchin Orch.; hit records by Xavier
Cugat and Jimmy Dorsey bands.


YOU'LL NEVER KNOW (24)
Lyrics: Mack Gordon: Music: Harry Warren
Introduced in the 1943 musical film: Hello, Frisco, Hello


COMIN' IN ON A WING AND A PRAYER (18)
Lyrics: Harold Adamson: Music: Jimmy McHugh


PAPER DOLL (23)
Johnny S. Black
Introduced in the 1942 musical film: Hi Good Lookin'


PEOPLE WILL SAY WE'RE IN LOVE (30)
Lyrics: Oscar Hammerstein II: Music: Richard Rodgers
Introduced in the 1943 Musical Theatre: Oklahoma!


MY HEART TELLS ME (19)
Lyrics: Mack Gordon; Music: Harry Warren
Introduced in the musical film: Sweet Rosie O'Grady


AS TIME GOES BY (21)
Herman Hupfield
Introduced in the Musical Theatre: Everybody's Welcome


SUNDAY, MONDAY, OR ALWAYS (18)
Lyrics: Johnny Burke; Music: James Van Heusen
Introduced in the musical film: Dixie


l'VE HEARD THAT SONG BEFORE (15)
Lyrics: Sammy Cahn; Music: Jule Styne
Introduced in the non-musical film: Youth on Parade


LET'S GET LOST (13)
Lyrics: Frank Loesser; Music: Jimmy McHugh
Introduced in the musical film: Happy Go Lucky


DON'T GET AROUND MUCH ANY MORE (16)
Lyrics: Sidney Keith (Bob) Russell; Music: Duke Ellington


ALL OR NOTHING AT ALL (14)
Arthur Altman and Jack Lawrence


ELMER'S TUNE (15)
Dick Jurgens, Sammy Gallop and Elmer Albrecht
Introduced in the musical film: Strictly in the Groove


MOONLIGHT BECOMES YOU (14)
Lyrics: Johnny Burke; Music: James Van Heusen
Introduced in the musical film: Road to Morocco


SHOO SHOO, BABY (17)
Phil Moore



SECOND PLACE SONGS - (TOTAL WEEKS)
YOU'DE BE SO NICE TO COME HOME TO (16)
Cole Porter
Introduced in the 1942 musical film: Something to Shout About


IN THE BLUE OF EVENING (18)
Lyrics: Thomas Adair; Music: Alfonso D'Artega


THEY'RE EITHER TOO YOUNG OR TOO OLD (12)
Lyrics: Frank Loesser; Music: Arthur Schwartz
Introduced in the musical film: Thank Your Lucky Star


PISTOL PACKIN' MAMA (14)
Al Dexter


OH, WHAT A BEAUTIFUL MORNIN' (13)
Lyrics: Oscar Hammerstein II; Music: Richard Rodgers
Introduced in the Musical Theatre: Oklahoma!


THAT OLD BLACK MAGIC (15)
Lyrics: Johnny Mercer; Music: Harold Arlen
Introduced in the musical film: Star Spangled Rhythm




THIRD PLACE SONGS - (TOTAL WEEKS)
IT CAN'T BE WRONG (20)
Lyrics: Kim Gannon; Music: Max Steiner
Introduced in the non-musical film: Now, Voyager


I HEARD YOU CRIED LAST NIGHT (13)
Lyrics: Jerrie Kruger; Music: Ted Grouya
Introduced in the non-musical film: Cindarella Swings It

John de Leeuw
01-01-05, 10:10 PM
Hey, how about "Sentimental Journey"? We used to sing that song aboard ship, shore or anywhere, anytime! This is the one song that means WW2 to me.....and always will. I believe that Doris Day sang the original., not so sure but music played by Les Brown ?Hands down number one choice in my book. Thanks for the memories Cadet@6, Semper Fi.........the new Semper Fi, certainly not the WW2 version! John de Leeuw

marinemom
01-01-05, 11:17 PM
Doris Day did sing the original - I have the 78rpm on that one - but one of the biggest songs for that period came from Vera Lynn, singing to British and US toops in England -- "There'll Be Bluebirds Over The White Cliffs Of Dover - which got a second life as the closing music for Dr. Strangelove.........

cadetat6
01-02-05, 12:03 PM
Sentimental Journey

This nostalgic tune evokes memories of the 40s, in a way few others can do. It was written by Bud Green, Les Brown and Ben Homer in 1944. The vocal was sensitively done by Doris Day, despite unfounded fears of the extreme vocal ranges required.Some in the band first thought that the song was not going to connect with the kids, but at it's debut in the Hotel Pennsylvania's Cafe Rouge the kids went crazy! It was finally recorded at the Les Brown Band's first session after the infamous recording ban. Even now, nearly 60 years later, the song still pleases... and still calls to mind the names of Les Brown and Doris Day.

Here are the famous lyrics as sung by Doris on the 1944 recording:



Gonna take a Sentimental Journey,
Gonna set my heart at ease.
Gonna make a Sentimental Journey,
to renew old memories.

Got my bags, got my reservations,
Spent each dime I could afford.
Like a child in wild anticipation,
I Long to hear that, "All aboard!"

Seven...that's the time we leave at seven.
I'll be waitin' up at heaven,
Countin' every mile of railroad
track, that takes me back.

Never thought my heart could be so yearny.
Why did I decide to roam?
Gotta take that Sentimental Journey,
Sentimental Journey home.
Sentimental Journey.

cadetat6
01-02-05, 12:09 PM
Born in London in 1917, Vera Lynn started her singing career as a young girl and became one of the most famous voices of World War II. She hosted a BBC radio show called "Sincerely Yours" from 1939, and her morale-boosting songs were a favourite among all British servicemen. Vera's most popular song was "We'll Meet Again", however she also put Dover firmly on the cultural map with her spirit-lifting ballad "There'll be Blue Birds over the White Cliffs of Dover", a song which is known the world over. In 1976, Vera Lynn was made a Dame.

Old Marine
01-17-05, 08:12 AM
All music by Glen Miller.

ese4mc
01-17-05, 09:28 AM
what about the mills brothers---marlene dietrich

cadetat6
01-17-05, 10:11 AM
In 1928, after working in Los Angeles and Chicago, Glenn moved on to New York City where he worked with bands of Ben Pollack, Red Nichols and Paul Ash as a trombonist and arranger. In 1932, Glenn organized the Smith Ballew Band, and worked two years as manager, arranger and trombonist. In 1934, he helped the Dorsey brothers to organize their first full-time Big Band and in 1935, he organized Ray Nobleís American band.

Finally, in 1937, Glenn decided to fulfill his dream and organize his own band. This first band soon ran into financial difficulties and had to disband, but Glenn was not one to give up and he tried again in 1938. This time was different, and in March of 1939, his band was chosen to play the summer season at the prestigious Glen Island Casino, in New Rochelle, New York. This big break led to another important engagement at Meadowbrook, New Jersey in the spring of the same year. Both places offered frequent radio broadcasts, and by mid-summer, the Miller Orchestra had developed a nationwide following. In the fall of 1939, it began a series of radio broadcasts for Chesterfield cigarettes which increased its already great popularity. Thereafter, the band was in constant demand for recording sessions and appeared in two films; Sun Valley Serenade in 1941 and Orchestra Wives in 1942.

In 1942, at the peak of his civilian career, Glenn decided he could better serve those in uniform by putting one on himself. By doing this, the band gave up a $20,000 weekly income. Too old to be drafted at age 38, Glenn first volunteered for the Navy but was told that they didnít need his services. Not giving up, Glenn wrote to the Armyís Brigadier General Charles Young on August 12, 1942. Miller persuaded the Army to accept him so he could in his own words, "put a little more spring into the feet of our marching men and a little more joy into their hearts and to be placed in charge of a modernized army band." After being accepted in the Army, Glennís civilian band played their last concert in Passaic, New Jersey on September 27th, 1942. It was such a sad event that the band couldnít finish playing the closing theme song, Moonlight Serenade.

cadetat6
01-17-05, 12:37 PM
Mills Brothers
The four brothers were all born in Piqua, Ohio -- John, Jr. in 1910, Herbert in 1912, Harry in 1913, and Donald in 1915. Their father owned a barber shop and founded a barbershop quartet as well, called the Four Kings of Harmony. His sons obviously learned their close harmonies first-hand, and began performing around the area. At one show, Harry Mills forgot his kazoo -- the group's usual accompaniment -- and ended up trying to emulate the instrument by cupping his hand over his mouth. The brothers were surprised to hear the sound of a trumpet proceeding from Harry's mouth, so they began to work the novelty into their act -- with John taking tuba, Donald trombone, and Herbert a second trumpet. The act was perfect for vaudeville, and the Mills Brothers also began broadcasting over a Cincinnatti radio station during the late '20s.

After moving to New York, the group became a sensation and hit it big during 1931 and early 1932 with the singles "Tiger Rag" and "Dinah" (the latter a duet with Bing Crosby). Dumb-founded listeners hardly believed the notice accompanying the records: "No musical instruments or mechanical devices used on this recording other than one guitar." Though the rather primitive audio of the time gave them a bit of latitude, the Mills Brothers indeed sounded exactly like they'd been backed by a small studio band. (It was, in essence, the flip side of early Duke Ellington material, on which the plunger mutes of Bubber Miley and Tricky Sam Nanton resulted in horns sounding just like voices.) The exposure continued during 1932, with appearances in the film The Big Broadcast and more hits including "St. Louis Blues" and "Bugle Call Rag." John, Jr.'s sudden death in 1936 was a huge blow to the group, but father John, Sr. took over as bass singer and Bernard Addison became the group's guitarist.

The novelty had appeared to wear off by the late '30s; despite duets with Ella Fitzgerald ("Dedicated to You") and Louis Armstrong ("Darling Nelly Gray"), the Mills Brothers' records weren't performing as well as they had earlier in the decade. All that changed in 1943 with the release of "Paper Doll," a sweet, intimate ballad that became one of the biggest hits of the decade -- twelve weeks on the top of the charts, and six million records sold (plus sheet music). The group made appearances in several movies during the early '40s, and hit number one again in 1944 with "You'll Always Hurt the One You Love." The influence of middle-of-the-road pop had slowly crept into their material from the 1940s; by the end of the decade the Mills Brothers began recording with traditional orchestras (usually conducted by Sy Oliver, Hal McIntyre or Sonny Burke). In 1952, "The Glow Worm" became their last number one hit.

Osotogary
01-17-05, 04:02 PM
The music from "Victory at Sea" I think could be added to this list. One song, I believe titled "No other love have I" or "No other love" was either song by Perry Como or Eddie Fisher did pretty well.

greensideout
01-17-05, 06:29 PM
These songs kept a lot of traction for many more years. I remember them all from radio and a TV show. Does anyone remember the name of that TV show?

Osotogary
01-17-05, 06:37 PM
The Lux Music Hall?

greensideout
01-17-05, 07:28 PM
LOL---No to Osotogary, that's not the name. Think back, waaaay back---lol.

Osotogary
01-17-05, 07:46 PM
I can't think that far back!! At least right now.
Paul Whitman and his Orchestra? He was on the television.
Cavalcade of Stars?

greensideout
01-17-05, 07:57 PM
I won't make you suffer--lol. It was, "The Hit Parade".

Osotogary
01-17-05, 08:16 PM
Brought to you by Lucky Strike? The blasted Hit Parade. I used to watch that program. That was way back when, if you wanted color television you put a colored cellophane sheet over the tube. Also you got darn disappointed if you wanted to look down something...like during a beauty contest. What do kids know? LOL

greensideout
01-17-05, 08:27 PM
LOL---Those were the days. (Did Archie Bunker already say that?)