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Marine1955
02-27-12, 03:38 PM
Hey has anyone heard that soon that everyone has to go Paperless in Hospitals and Doctors offices ???
The other day at my wife's last app. for her chemo treatment they said they were preparing to go paperless cause of a law going into effect soon..
They were going crazy with there lap tops trying to enter everything into them without using paper..
I've heard that said for years that's what they want to do, is go paperless so we would save trees.
Anyone else heard of this yet???

advanced
02-27-12, 03:47 PM
Maybe it's just me, but I can see it causing quite a problem in the shiiters.

Ed Palmer
02-27-12, 03:54 PM
Maybe it's just me, but I can see it causing quite a problem in the shiiters.

beat me to it .

Marine1955
02-27-12, 03:58 PM
Maybe it's just me, but I can see it causing quite a problem in the shiiters.


don't you remember the movie where they used the three shells with Sylvester Stallone and Rob Snider and Sandra Bullock and Wesley.. called Demolition Man

Omegaham
02-28-12, 04:46 AM
It has nothing to do with environmentalism; electronic filing saves a massive amount of money.

If you have a large amount of patients, filing papers is expensive. You need to employ someone to collect the data, someone to check it, someone to organize it, someone to file it, and someone to maintain it for immediate recall. Some of these jobs can be done by the same people; however, if you're a large hospital, you can easily have a library-sized room of records and an entire staff of people responsible for records. Can you imagine the headaches that happen when someone takes the day off? Or he's sick. Or he quits and they have some new guy who doesn't know the system. Ask any doctor - the paperwork is one of the most infuriating aspects of the job.

Meanwhile, if it's all electronically filed, you employ someone to check the data to make sure it's properly filled out and someone to maintain the database. That's it. Not to mention, when a doctor wants to review your file, he can just look your name up. No digging through a filing cabinet, no messing around with some other doctor's terrible handwriting. Just open up the file, type Ctrl-F, and you're good to go.

As a Marine, electronic filing has saved me a MASSIVE amount of headaches. It used to be that all maintenance actions had to be documented in writing. "Okay, I just did preventative maintenance on twenty radios. Their serial numbers are... crap, I gotta look them up. The PM code is... crap, I gotta look that up too." Multiply that by a hundred when you're doing corrective maintenance. With electronic filing, all that is on the page. You have all the serial numbers of your radios by channel and frequency, you have all the PM codes, and you have directions for recording man-hours and who's doing it. Plus you can just duplicate it twenty times and change the serial numbers instead of having to write a whole new form.

I still have to keep paper copies of supply requisitions, and it's a pain. They're starting to let me scan everything in and send it by e-mail instead of keeping it in a binder and faxing stuff, but I still have to keep a massive binder of the whole year's part orders.

Yeah. Make everything electronic. It'd make everyone's life a lot easier. I don't care about the trees.

Zulu 36
02-28-12, 07:53 AM
I spoke with #1 daughter, who is a medical admin type. She said that the Obamacare law has a provision requiring medical providers at all levels to go paperless by 2013. This is a tough requirement, especially for smaller doctor's offices since older paper records have to be digitized too.

She also said, to add to the problem, on 1Oct2013, new medical billing codes are to go into effect. This by itself will be a pain in the butt for everyone in general, but smaller providers in particular.

#1 daughter says no one will go completely paperless in the foreseeable future, particularly the military.

Thanks Obama and Congress.

OLE SARG
02-28-12, 01:30 PM
I am sorry but I cannot thank this pos, apoligizing, two-faced, * for ANYTHING he says he has done!!!!!!!!!!! * him and his circue of clowns

SEMPER FI,

ChuckH
02-28-12, 01:33 PM
My orthopedic surgeon has the paperless system. he enters everything on a ipad type device...and then it all goes up to the front desk when I check out for my next appointment..

ameriken
02-28-12, 01:47 PM
My anti-Obama doctor has been paperless for about 2 years now. Seems like it works great as most everything is automated now. I don't think it has anything to do with saving trees, rather it simplifies everything and is more efficient.

They had a learning curve but everyone has adjusted to the new system. I think it's great, so long as the records are backed up more than once, and the privacy and security issues are protected.

Marine1955
02-28-12, 02:00 PM
I am sorry but I cannot thank this pos, apoligizing, two-faced, muthafvcker for ANYTHING he says he has done!!!!!!!!!!! fvck him and his circue of clowns

SEMPER FI,


Have you had this animosity for O Bummer for a while?? http://i55.tinypic.com/zmmquc.jpg

EGTSpec
02-28-12, 02:07 PM
I spoke with #1 daughter, who is a medical admin type.
She said that the Obamacare law has a provision requiring medical providers at all levels to go paperless by 2013. This is a tough requirement, especially for smaller doctor's offices since older paper records have to be digitized too.
She also said, to add to the problem, on 1Oct2013, new medical billing codes are to go into effect. This by itself will be a pain in the butt for everyone in general, but smaller providers in particular.

#1 daughter says no one will go completely paperless in the foreseeable future, particularly the military.

Thanks Obama and Congress.I see a chance to start a business here, or is it just a pipe dream? Someone has to enter all that info into a data base.

Phantom Blooper
02-28-12, 02:16 PM
Once they get all the records in a database the government will work towards complete INTERNET access and control.......

Marine1955
02-28-12, 02:20 PM
I see a chance to start a business here, or is it just a pipe dream? Someone has to enter all that info into a data base.

If you ever listen to some of the commercials on radio they talk about that it's called home schooling you to learn how to do the report of Doctors. They boost of making big money at home by learning how to trans-scribe the notes to computers.. My Niece started to do it but the cost of learning was $500 dollar a lesson..
needless to say she couldn't afford it,but after 4 session she had to quit. Now she into the school for $2000 dollars..

EGTSpec
02-28-12, 02:22 PM
Once they get all the records in a database the government will work towards complete INTERNET access and control.......Big Brother will be watching your colon.:D

Apache
02-28-12, 04:26 PM
Just today brought Mama-San home from knee surgery.

Between us we filled out a ream of paper.

Interesting note
Several times they verbally verified name and SS #

FoxtrotOscar
02-28-12, 04:52 PM
Just more food for hackers... I particularly don't want my data and personal info all over the void of the internet...

And it will happen...

Omegaham
02-28-12, 05:22 PM
Just more food for hackers... I particularly don't want my data and personal info all over the void of the internet...

And it will happen...

This is a valid concern; greater efficiency for collecting, organizing, and interpreting data also means better efficiency for unscrupulous people to collect data for their own purposes. All you need is to write a Perl script, something like this:

foreach @names
{
print FH join(' ', $_, collectdata($_);
}

sub collectdata($)
{
... (Insert collection method here)
}

and you just copied everyone's name and all the data associated with it into a regular text file. No skill required, just some basic programming knowledge to get the file format down.

You aren't going to get that sort of efficiency with a paper system. What's a guy gonna do, break into a library full of filing cabinets?

However, the paranoid among us can be glad that identity theft is decreasing in both frequency and amounts lost due to the credit card companies wising up to how fraud is committed. I'd much rather have a slightly increased chance of fraud than the increased cost of having a paper filing system. Paperless filing means a lower cost for care.

You can prevent the above stuff by instituting proper security for handling those files. Encryption, strong passwords, and controlled access are very safe when used correctly. I'd never put that sort of information on the Internet; that's just retarded. Keep the system internal, fax or e-mail data to other hospitals if stuff needs to be transferred.

jp2usmc
03-04-12, 01:45 PM
I am sorry but I cannot thank this pos, apoligizing, two-faced, * for ANYTHING he says he has done!!!!!!!!!!! * him and his circue of clowns

SEMPER FI,

Hey Sarg,

New policy - or, maybe rules about enforcing the policy.

You can't be doing that. The boss says these word censors are in place for a reason, not for people to find clever ways around them.

ecom
03-16-12, 05:13 AM
My orthopedic surgeon has the paperless system. he enters everything on a ipad type device...and then it all goes up to the front desk when I check out for my next appointment..

At work, we have about two dozen tablet computers that run Windows 7. The users love them because they are connected to the wireless network. The line workers can enter data into the mainframe/centralized database while away from their desks and make it available for administrative staff immediately.

ecom
03-16-12, 05:28 AM
This is a valid concern; greater efficiency for collecting, organizing, and interpreting data also means better efficiency for unscrupulous people to collect data for their own purposes. All you need is to write a Perl script, something like this:

foreach @names
{
print FH join(' ', $_, collectdata($_);
}

sub collectdata($)
{
... (Insert collection method here)
}

and you just copied everyone's name and all the data associated with it into a regular text file. No skill required, just some basic programming knowledge to get the file format down.

You aren't going to get that sort of efficiency with a paper system. What's a guy gonna do, break into a library full of filing cabinets?

However, the paranoid among us can be glad that identity theft is decreasing in both frequency and amounts lost due to the credit card companies wising up to how fraud is committed. I'd much rather have a slightly increased chance of fraud than the increased cost of having a paper filing system. Paperless filing means a lower cost for care.

You can prevent the above stuff by instituting proper security for handling those files. Encryption, strong passwords, and controlled access are very safe when used correctly. I'd never put that sort of information on the Internet; that's just retarded. Keep the system internal, fax or e-mail data to other hospitals if stuff needs to be transferred.

I have seen the systems of one company that does outsourced IT for medical organizations and all I have to say is that it was a mess. They had their terminal servers exposed directly to the Internet for example. I would have expected a VPN requirement or Citrix instead. I just cringed when I saw they had RDP open to the Internet as well as port 21 and 22. If it were for a honeypot, that's one thing, but it's not.

At work, every laptop we issue is fully encrypted AES256 just in case the laptop is lost and it contains sensitive information. A lot of times they won't contain sensitive information but we cannot take that risk. A great concept if not for the human factor. We require users check in with us once a quarter, and I've seen more than a few laptops with at sticky attached with the user name and password.

The other human factor is that some employees don't want company issued laptops because they don't want to go on record as having lost a company laptop so they ask us to set up their laptops for access. Unfortunately management will happily kowtow to these users and even give them giving them VPN meaning they can copy sensitive data to their non-encrypted machine. Since I am prohibited from encrypting those personal laptops...our info sec just goes out the door.

jp2usmc
03-16-12, 09:24 AM
I have a complete product management system in place that requires each employee to first log in using their company badge before an item can be scanned.

If an item is NOT scanned at a particular location, either a supervisor must provide an override (scanning their badge to authorize it) or the item must go back to that location to be re-tested.

Most of the scanning is done on Windows Terminals (Windows XP like), all data is stored on our internal SQL database, and about 10 Windows Mobile devices are carried around the plant to do spot inspections where a wall outlet is not feasible.

21670

thewookie
03-16-12, 09:54 AM
I like it -- going paperless. As long as they can get the security down. Aah, but they have ;)

---> Pretty soon at the FBI (http://www.nextgov.com/nextgov/ng_20110908_7162.php) academy they will no longer be issuing textbooks to new agents -- they will all get new Ipads issued to them. Same thing for new agents at FLETC. Imagine the cost savings. Any updates to material can be pushed out to the agents electronically, they don't need to lug around (and possibly lose) multiple heavy books. It's a no brainier if you ask me.

The last company that I worked for which does Iris Recognition (http://www.bi2technologies.com/technology) has developed an application for the "FBI Ipad" that takes an iris scan, or requires an iris scan to get access to the Ipad.

The iris is much more unique than a finger print, it's faster, more accurate, non intrusive -- it's the most unique identifier on the outside of the human body. It's really three fold security requiring a positive iris match, a positive fingerprint match and a positive facial recognition. You can't beat that.

They are doing the same thing for the healthcare industry and even though I don't work for that company anymore, I am a small investor in it and I can't wait until it takes off even more.

They have a mobile app for the Iphone called MORIS (http://www.bi2technologies.com/products) that law enforcement uses currently, similar to the BAT (http://www.findbiometrics.com/articles/i/298/) system being used in Iraq and Afghanistan to recognize and identify people based on iris, face, or fingerprint.

Before I left the company they were having high level discussions with lots of people from the Department of Defense to replace the BAT.

http://bostinno.com/2010/11/22/popular-science-names-iphone-crime-fighter-moris-a-best-innovation-of-2010/ (http://bostinno.com/2010/11/22/popular-science-names-iphone-crime-fighter-moris-a-best-innovation-of-2010/)